This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
0answers
8 views

Can I use “usually” to mean “not always”?

I had a conversation earlier and something struck me as not being right. I will denote myself by M and the caller as C. phone rings M:"Hello." C:"Is your grandfather there?" M:"I am not sure to be ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

reassign to or reassign in

I'm not a native English speaker and I'm always confused with the usage of prepositions. Vehicle’s ownership is reassigned to the name of the loan officer or Vehicle’s ownership is reassigned in the ...
-2
votes
2answers
28 views

how to express trials and extenuating life experiences, that led to screw ups in my past [on hold]

how to express trials and extenuating life experiences, that led to screw ups in my past. examples: bad grades in freshman year, laziness, drug use. and how i have rebounded and made myself a ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Do scenarios hover?

I was recently editing a document produced by a consulting firm. I came across the sentence: Under this scenario, Kazakhstan can expect to secure its energy sector. I quickly replaced under with ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

What words are trending?

Google graphs word usage in print by year. It was interesting to see "cardinality" show a sharp upwards trend. What other words have become vastly more popular in recent years? Is there a resource to ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

Which phrase is grammatically correct? [on hold]

Which phrase is grammatically correct: "working under a tight schedule" or "working with a tight schedule"?
4
votes
2answers
60 views

“Queuing twice for a cup of coffee is once too many.” Is this correct?

Or should I say "(...) once too often" or "(...) one time too many" instead? Or perhaps, "queuing twice for a cup of coffee is one queue too many?" My issue with once too many is that it makes once ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Is it common to use 'time slot' to refer to days/weeks?

How would you say to a client that you a have a 'free time slot' (like days or weeks) to take a job? Is it common to refer to 'time slot' even if I'm thinking about days or even weeks?
2
votes
4answers
40 views

'Fine Results' is fine?

I'm currently working in a slogan and my outcome so far is something like Fine Results, Simple Methods However, by googling "fine results", the search results shows me that there is little to ...
4
votes
3answers
63 views

Is it “tomorrow” after midnight? Or is it still “today”?

Let me start with an observation: Let's say it's half past 12 and you're heading off to bed, I personally would say Tomorrow I have to get up early for work And as far as I know all my friends ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Words play - does it have a special name in English? How to do the same with 'security' word for example?

By looking at this picture: Or at the title of this album: You can see that the authors used there something which I call a word game. My question is, does doing so has an official name? How can ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

“confine” versus “boundary” [on hold]

Is anybody aware of the difference between confine and boundary? Both are translated as having the same meaning. Any clear tips?
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Can you use “perhaps” at the beginning of a sentence and omit the verb?

For example: More students are emerging with A grades in A level exams. Perhaps as a result of sheer hard work and competition. More students are emerging with A grades in A level exams. This is ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Is there any specific word to describe this selfish idea?

"I support using cleaner energy source in moral, but if it harm my profit,eg:pay extra fee, I would not support" Is there any specific term to describe such idea?
0
votes
3answers
47 views

What's the function of 'adding to' here [on hold]

As the day drew to a close, Norwegians continued to pay their tribute to the dead, adding to the carpet of flowers outside the cathedral. I just read this and I wondered what adding to means ...
1
vote
2answers
42 views

To prolong vs to protract

What is the difference between the words to prolong and to protract? Can we replace the words with each other without losing their meanings in the following sentences? To protract means: Prolong: ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

The difference between remnant, vestige, remains,ruin and trace [closed]

what are differences between the words remnant, vestige, remains,ruin and trace in a historical sense? A trace or remnant of something that is disappearing or no longer exists ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

to emanate from vs to stem from

Are the words to emanate from and to stem from synonym in the following sense? Do you think I can swap with each other without changing the meaning of the following sentences ? 1 (Of a feeling, ...
2
votes
3answers
178 views

Is there a difference between “dislike” and “don't like”?

A friend of mine for whom English is a second language told me that I am the only person he knows who uses the word "dislike", and asked me what the difference was from saying that I "don't like" ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

I want to know the difference between can I and could i

I am learning grammar and I feel some confusion between the usage of can I and could I. Is there some rule I should use?
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Linking words doubt

Is the following sentence correct? Can I use both linking words separated only with a comma? Additionally, although the quality is...
-1
votes
0answers
40 views

The differences between being crafty, cunning, conman and sly

What are the differences between being crafty, cunning, conman and sly in terms of meaning and usage ?
0
votes
4answers
85 views

A rare currency

For example: When I am writing an article about friendship, and want to say it's difficult to find a good friend, it is possible to say it's like finding a rare currency today?
0
votes
2answers
48 views

does the word PERSONS exist? Should I only use it for singular? PERSON [duplicate]

I need to know the correct use of this word, I am quiet confused about the plural form and singular form due to some people use it as plural persons and I was taught that the plural is people1
16
votes
1answer
2k views

Logically, could the word “University” mean the opposite of “Diversity”?

DI- twice; two-; double. DI-VERSE: showing a great deal of variety; very different. DI-VERS-ITY: the state of being diverse; variety. UNI- one; having or consisting of one. While, by ...
4
votes
5answers
127 views

Can “some” be more than 50%?

The word "some" has often the sense of "few" if given in a bound. Does this mean more than 50%? It would be good if some historical account mentioned, who uses "some" to be more than 50%?
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Can I say a ligament has been ruptured?

In basketball, when you tear your achilles tendon, it can be said that it has been "ruptured." I understand what rupture means, so in the same context, can I say, I ruptured my ACL? In sports, I have ...
-2
votes
0answers
44 views

the word “annoying” in official documents [closed]

how do I call something annoying for user experience for example in official document?
0
votes
3answers
47 views

Is there a list of English words where some of their letters can be replaceed with Greek letters? [closed]

Is there a list of English words where some of their letters can be replaceed with Greek letters? for example the word Archive can be written as arXve, where X is the Greek letter chi.
0
votes
3answers
57 views

Which is most correct: “untransparent”, “un-transparent”, “intransparent”, “in-transparent”, or something else?

I want to say that something is not transparent. Which is most correct: "untransparent", "un-transparent", "intransparent", "in-transparent", or something else?
1
vote
3answers
52 views

Which is correct, “to take refuge in” or “to take refuge with”?

Concerning refuge with a higher existence such as an Omnipotent being, what is more befitting to use, English wise: To take refuge in [Omnipotent being] To take refuge with [Omnipotent being] ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Can I use “more younger” in a sentence? [closed]

For example: Who looks more younger in this image, me or you?
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Long-term v lifelong [closed]

Should I say "It's been a long-term dream of mine to do sth" or "It's been a lifelong dream of mine to do sth"
0
votes
2answers
42 views

How can you use Fuzzily in a sentence? [closed]

I typed fuzzily in a spell-checked field on a website and was surprised to see it said it was correct. I looked it up on Merriam-Webster, and sure enough they list it as a word: fuzz·i·ly ...
0
votes
2answers
43 views

What do you call this fraction?

Is this how you write these fractions in words? 5/21 is five twenty-ones, 1/21 is one twenty-one. Can someone please clear this for me? I know 1/4 is one-quarter or one-fourth and 2/5 is two-fifths ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

Can I use 'measurable' to stress that the concept must have numeric quantity?

I am describing certain self-organization technique, which has the concept of goals (duh). These goals must manifest themselves in certain quantities (e.g. 'go outside for 30 minutes', 'read 10 pages' ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

“They” vs. “he” or “she” [duplicate]

I have noticed that the use of the third person singular "he" or "she" has been replaced with the word "they". Has there been an official acceptance of the odd sounding usage?
0
votes
0answers
37 views

About Verbs that can be followed by object + infinitive

For instance, "The concepts in the next chapter should help persuade them." And then, englishgrammer.org explain this, "Some verbs are followed by object + infinitive without to. Examples are: let, ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

“Could you please, let us know when this issue is fixed?” correct usage

Is this correct usage? I would like to ask someone to let me know when issue is fixed thanks
2
votes
1answer
37 views

Is it common to say X color filled Y shape?

I ask this because I couldn't find any instance on Google. Here's an example to illustrate the usage: The logo featured a cartoon whale drawn as a lower half-circle. Blue filled the shape, with ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Word choice: When to use “of” vs. “about”?

Word choice question: Is it OK to say "We want to update our approach to engaging and informing the public "of" the program and services,"? Seems to me we inform "about" a topic.
2
votes
1answer
45 views

Phrase about purity of a solid substance

Most high-purity deposits occur within the Carboniferous Limestone of the Peak District, the Mendips. Large areas of the Chalk outcrop also contain high-purity resources. Is it possible to ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

In English, why is the “Heart” analogy always used to describe the core or central theme?

There are commonly used phrases like "heart of the city" and "heart of the matter". Even to describe the nature of people, we use words like "kind hearted" and "evil hearted". My question is, why is ...
0
votes
2answers
82 views

How to use the sound “ei” or “ey” in English conversation, which is quite popular in Australia?

I lived in Australia for 13 years and many times when speaking to local Aussie people, I often hear they use "ei" or "ey" (I do not know how to write that word, and that is why I am asking you) like ...
3
votes
3answers
61 views

Is it common to use the word “throbbings” (plural of throbbing) as a noun?

I ask because my word processor highlighted it as a wrong word. And I couldn't find any instances of my desired usage on Google. Here's an example sentence: I have migraines. I'm not talking ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Can “memorable” and “easy to remember” be interchanged?

This is the definition of memorable in the dictionary https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=define%3Amemorable memorable: worth remembering or ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

How can we describe a broad sense of taste?

How can we describe a broad sense of taste? Can we say that we have a versatile taste? Or is it more correct to say that we have a diverse taste? Taste here is with reference to food.
0
votes
1answer
76 views

To prove some property “to stretch to some class of objects”

While collaborating in the writing of a scientific paper, one of the co-authors wrote ".../... and we will prove it to stretch to some class", is it usual ? The context is the following. "Then, ...
1
vote
3answers
54 views

Is “Chemistry” used for any relationship or just for romantic relationship?

In dictionary, Chemistry means the complex emotional or psychological interaction between people (http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/chemistry) Seem the definition does not say that ...
0
votes
2answers
51 views

usage of refrain and abstain

I am frequently confused regarding two words : refrain and abstain. I understand that abstain has negative connotations as it conveys that something must be stopped. On the other hand, refrain carries ...