This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

1
vote
2answers
42 views

What word sounds similar to “magnanimous” but means “impressively large”?

A friend of mine often uses the word "magnanimous" to mean "large and impressive in a positive way". Examples: "Look at this magnanimous snow!" "He had a magnanimous, bushy eyebrows." I understand ...
3
votes
4answers
78 views

Polite or unrectified placement of the word please

I would please prefer to take both parts of the test on Monday. Is the placement of the word please in this sentence grammatically correct?
-2
votes
0answers
34 views

What does “but” mean in a English sentence?

The annual summit last four days and all expenses but your flight and transportation on the first and last day are covered. What does this statement mean ? Does it mean that The flight and ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Usage of would have

While reading a document I came across the following sentence: "After 9 months’ time data base administrator will run a job which will copy record from operational to archival data base and as soon as ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Correct usage of the term 'gravity'

If I want to make clear that one object is being affected by the gravity of another object, for example the Earth and the moon. Would I say: The moon has a gravity, just as all mass does. or, ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

What is the scope of the word 'Augment'?

The dictionary meaning of the word Augment is to make (something) greater by adding to it. Is the scope of the word restricted to just quantity or does it extend to quality as well? For example: 'Her ...
2
votes
0answers
39 views

“Lasting” or “with a duration of”? [on hold]

I'm editing a very bureaucratic document and I'm trying to make it less bureaucratic. There's a passage that refers to "a session with a duration of 1-2 hours." I want to change it to "a session ...
3
votes
2answers
72 views

Politically zealous usage [on hold]

Is "politically zealous" an appropriate phrase to negatively describe someone who is obsessed by political ideologies, and who is ideologically crazy such as being a Nazi believer? If not, how to ...
0
votes
4answers
48 views

Using 'rather' before or after a verb

Out of the two sentences : I should've written rather a diary. I should've rather written a diary. Which one's correct if I want to convey the meaning that I wrote something else earlier and ...
0
votes
4answers
74 views

“Continuously” vs “continually”: What's the difference? [closed]

What's the difference in the usage of these two adverbs continuously and continually? Here are some examples: a) She was told off for continually being late. b) It rained continuously for ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

Usage of the word' physical agility' [on hold]

Does agility always mean only physical or while writing a sentence we need to mention 'physical agility'?
0
votes
2answers
51 views

Non-repudiable vs non-refutable vs non-reputable in computer security

In computer security there is a concept known as: non-repudiation "Non-repudiation refers to a state of affairs where the purported maker of a statement will not be able to successfully challenge the ...
0
votes
2answers
23 views

Media Resources or Media and Resources [closed]

I want to name the section that has downloadable PDFs, Press Releases, Annual Reports, Latest News and Newsletters. Which one is more appropriate? Media Resources or Media & Resources?
0
votes
2answers
34 views

Is “as to” used correctly in this context?

Is "as to" used correctly in this context? "John suggests they go see Billy while they make the decision as to whether or not they should agree to the operation." Thanks!
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Is the use of the word “metrics” correct in this quote? [closed]

Is the use of the word "metrics" correct in this quote? "The problem with identity lies in the arbitrary metrics we attempt to use when defining it." - T. Cowan Thanks for your time.
8
votes
3answers
1k views

What does “sunset” mean when used as a verb? [duplicate]

There was the following quote from Adam B. Schiff, Democrat Representative on President Obama’s request for a formal authorization of Congress to fight the Islamic State in New York Times article ...
0
votes
2answers
32 views

Describing a product in an ad [closed]

We are preparing an ad for pictures, and we would like to write that we have certificates of authenticity for the pictures. What would be the best way to write it? My suggestion is to use passive ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

'Say what you want' in one word or meaning? [closed]

How can you say.. 'Say what you want' in either one word or meaning? Thank you very much
0
votes
1answer
43 views

How to word a sentence better [closed]

Please help with wording of this sentence. Thanks Kudos to those teachers when guidance sends for a student, letting us know if the student is taking a quiz or are involved in something they ...
4
votes
1answer
84 views

Why Literacy “Rate”?

I recently had a discussion with a friend, and he was using a phrase repeatedly which said "Conversion Rate vs Time". I pointed out to him that Rate already has the time factor, so you don't have to ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

Is there a (possible archaic) definition of “permitted” that does not imply “permission”?

I recently came across this question, about an oddity from Lord of the Rings. The question is asking about this passage: “I would ask one thing before we go,” said Frodo, “a thing which I often ...
0
votes
2answers
53 views

Using “Oldtimer” for items?

Can I use oldtimer for a place or an item that people get used to using during certain times? For example: That photo booth has become an oldtimer for the fair goers.
0
votes
1answer
37 views

How is “distinctively visual” being used in this sentence? [closed]

I found this sentence: Discuss how the distinctively visual have created distinctive experiences Is "distinctively visual" being used as a noun or a verb here?
0
votes
2answers
86 views

How to refer to people you recently met

How to refer to people you recently met (names have been introduced and a short discussion made). We can't possibly call them friends, can we? He raises his eyes to look at his (friends?)
0
votes
2answers
82 views

A house “made of ” or “made from” mud bricks? [duplicate]

I know the difference between "made of" and "made from", but could you help me choose which one I should use in the following sentence? This house is made of (or) from mud bricks
0
votes
2answers
45 views

Is “those information” valid, or is it “this information”?

I know information does not have a plural form (syntaxically talking), which leads me to the following problem: The username and password are missing. I need [this/those] information. I feel ...
2
votes
2answers
116 views

Could `impliant` be a proper word, meaning opposite of `pliant`?

We have the word impliable meaning the opposite of pliable, but there is no dictionary opposite of pliant. (Shorter OED, Apple Dictionary on Mac, dictionary.reference.com, ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

On the origin and usage of 'mainstream'!

Mainstream is a very common expression mainly used, both as an adjective and a noun, in its figurative sense to refer to: the prevalent attitudes, values, and practices of a society or group ...
1
vote
1answer
104 views

Why is “decimate” still linked to its number-specific definition when other similar words are not? [closed]

As any pedant will tell you, decimate means “to destroy a tenth of something.” Of course, its modern usage has been expanded to this: to destroy a large number of (plants, animals, people, ...
0
votes
0answers
48 views

“Cretin” and “imbecile” in US English

How common is the insult "cretin" in US English? What minimum age and level of education do users of the word typically have? Would you say that "cretin" is much less common than "imbecile" in US ...
2
votes
3answers
99 views

“Kindergarten” old fashioned?

Is "kindergarten" an old fashioned word nowadays? I see it used in many kindergartens' websites, how (un)popular is it?
2
votes
2answers
132 views

How exactly is “to checkmate” used as a verb?

Merriam-Webster has this definition of checkmate: checkmate transitive verb 1: to arrest, thwart, or counter completely 2: to check (a chess opponent's king) so that escape is impossible ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

“Details on” or “Details about”? Use in technical writing

I'm writing a technical text about the information in a report, dealing with telecommunication procedures. I want to highlight that the information field I'm referring to doesn't provide any ...
7
votes
6answers
1k views

Can the word “capsize” be used for cars? [closed]

Is it possible to use the word capsize for cars? As an example, The car has been capsized and hit the wall.
0
votes
2answers
75 views

Difference between a “crowned jewel”, “crown jewel”, and “jeweled crown”?

I was grading a student's paper and found their use of the term crowned jewel confusing. They used the term in this way: The article was the crowned jewel of their evidence.. It sounded wrong at ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

Usage of the word “probably”

Consider the following sentences: She will probably come to the party. He may probably forget his umbrella. In the second sentence, isn't the word probably redundant? The uncertainty is ...
1
vote
2answers
39 views

Does “cease” express a temporary interruption or a permanent termination of an action?

In this blog there is a sentence: The failure of the "I Surrender" leaflets led the American PSYOP specialists to carefully construct a leaflet with the words "I Cease Resistance." Does "cease" ...
0
votes
2answers
67 views

Can we say “He drunk water?” [closed]

I know about the comparatives - drink,drank,drunk. But when I just used it in the sentence "He drunk water!", Someone pointed that it was wrong and that the verb "DRUNK" must be used only when someone ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Import and export preposition usage

Consider the following phrases: The car was imported from Detroit. The car was exported from Detroit. The car was imported to Detroit. The car was exported to Detroit. Are these all semantically ...
0
votes
2answers
63 views

Can things make smells?

I have read that things "produce" smells. Something creates a certain smell, is OK, I believe. I could not find "something makes a smell" during my online search, however. I wanted to say, "The milk ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

“X style,” vs “X-style.”

Example: He rose from the dead Jesus style. He rose from the dead Jesus-style. Similarly: This was my first time digging goat excrement. Not an item in my list of things to do before ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

Couple, few and several [duplicate]

During typical conversation, how would one define couple, few and several? I have read the actual definitions; however, they appear to be a bit vague. My thoughts are: A couple is two. A few is ...
0
votes
2answers
65 views

Is “terribly beautiful” a common use of the word terribly? [closed]

My brother mentioned the phrase terrible in French is used for both good and bad sometimes. Is this true for English? I have heard people use the phrase "terribly beautiful" in a context of ...
0
votes
3answers
72 views

How Do You Use The Word 'Abode'? [closed]

How do you use the word 'abode' when you are talking about someone's home, not the past tense of 'abide'. Is this sentence grammatically correct? "Everyone remains in their abode."
1
vote
2answers
68 views

Especially or specially [closed]

Please explain the difference between especially and specially ? Especially: ADVERB 1 Used to single out one person or thing over all others: 2 To a great extent; very much: ...
6
votes
6answers
172 views

Shift to “must” for negation of “have to”?

According to englishpage.com, if have to or must expresses certainty, the negative form uses must not. Example: That has to be Jerry. They said he was tall with bright red hair. => That must not ...
-1
votes
1answer
110 views

Is there a way to specify a person just by hair color? [closed]

You can say: "Look, there is a blonde woman." or "Look, there is a gray woman." If I am talking about hair color. But at the moment I say brown or black it is about skin color. And red just ...
-2
votes
1answer
47 views

Indorse or Endorse? [closed]

When I was still working in the office, my Boss usually asks me to make an Indorsement/Endorsement. I used, the ENDORSEMENT, but I come to read my Professor's endorsement which is spelled as ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

“Financier” in British and American English

I am teaching English to a group of university students whose major is Finance, and whose native language is not English. I have no background in economics in general or finance in particular. I am ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

Usage of “which” or “that” [duplicate]

I'm a bit confused with the correct answer in this phrase: In Florida, you can explore the Everglades or the beaches, _______ are relaxing places. Is it "which are relaxing places" or "that ...