This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
1answer
11 views

Use of “percentage”

I have a question about "percentage". Can I use "percentage of google users in Internet users"? Is this a valid use of word "percentage"? Thank you!
2
votes
2answers
200 views

Is it permissible to omit “is” in the following case?

Denial. One of the strongest, most stubborn human feelings. It has nothing to do with logic; its function (is) to prevent us from completely falling apart, going insane. Can I omit is in the ...
0
votes
2answers
15 views

Usage of spending time

Which one is correct? a)Thank you for the time you spent on reading this letter. b)Thank you for taking the time on reading this letter.
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Effect of English Language & Usage Stack? [migrated]

Not sure if this is the appropriate forum, but: Is there a way to measure the effect of stack exchange on correct usage of the English language?
1
vote
0answers
32 views

What is the spatial difference between in and on [migrated]

.....that I received in my email or .....that I received on my email What is the correct preposition in the example above? What is the "spatial" difference between these two prepositions when apply ...
30
votes
6answers
5k views

What is the American word for 'tea-towel'?

On a tour from Australia to the states my wife asked me to stop at the gift store and buy memorable fridge-magnets and tea-towels. Everywhere I went, none of the store attendants seemed to know what ...
-1
votes
0answers
50 views

Correct term for niece's daughter

Would my niece's daughter be my "great" niece or my "grand" niece?
1
vote
1answer
84 views

“Don't fall in anger”, I heard you say

If the phrase rang a bell, it's because the actual Oasis song lyric is "Don't look back in anger", I heard you say. But did my question title sound very strange or only slightly off? I might argue ...
-1
votes
1answer
37 views

Is it clear what “it” is referring to in the following sentence?

It'd been so long since I last saw his smile it came like a sun. I'm not sure whether it's clear what the bolded it is referring to. If so, can I write it like that? Is it grammatical?
1
vote
2answers
133 views

“I was used”, is it correct?

I want to use the term used, like I was used. I mean when someone used my name or some of my property for his own advantage. Is it OK to say in this context: I was used ?
0
votes
2answers
38 views

How to use “come true” in a such sentence

I am wondering to use a sentence like: I am about to make one of my childhood dream come true. Is it a best practice?
2
votes
3answers
277 views

“There were lots of other things on the menu he could’ve deterred me to.”

I asked a food truck operator if a certain menu item was spicy. He told me that no, it was not. It turns out it was. When speaking with my friends, I said that "there were lots of other things on the ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Can “one” be omitted if another one immediately follows? [duplicate]

Example: Not all experiences have to be earth-shaking. Sometimes the simplest (ones) are the most valuable ones." In the above example, the first one has been omitted. Is the sentence still ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Usage of 'indeed', specifically in terms of position in a sentence

I'm wondering if there's any rule or consensus on how one should use the word 'indeed' when trying to convey actuality. The context is that I'm writing an email to someone about a job, but I'm not ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

Word or phrase describing on/off state

English is not my primary language so I have hard time with this problem. I am currently writing comments to computer code. There is setting that enable/disable some functionality. What would be ...
1
vote
3answers
85 views

“Is that good?” vs “Is that any good?”

Is there any difference between the meaning implied by: Is that good? and Is that any good? I would appreciate if you give examples to show the differences, if there is any. ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

Do you sit “against” a tree or “by” a tree? [closed]

I sometimes place myself against a tree and read a book. However, is the word "against" correct in this context? Or do I sit by a tree?
2
votes
3answers
80 views

Catholic with a small c

When Conservative is spelled with a capital C it usually refers to the Conservative and Unionist Party of Great Britain. Spelled with a small c, it becomes the adjective conservative meaning *averse ...
1
vote
3answers
514 views

New (slang?) meaning of bass?

I have come across the song "About that bass" by Meghan Trainor, and was wondering what "bass" and "treble" mean in the chorus, which goes: Because you know I'm all about that bass, 'Bout that ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

How to ask “why would I have regretted it”?

If someone asked me if I regretted something, how can I express if even his/her assumption that I regretted something surprises me? In my mother tongue I would answer with a question like "why would I ...
-2
votes
1answer
55 views

how to use “click” for the “lines” of a text box [closed]

In the following sentence I have some problem using prepositions related to click, empty. Please click an empty line in the textbox From the sentence above I want to say the user to ...
7
votes
2answers
870 views

Are we using the term 'apocalypse' in wrong way? [closed]

What I read about the term apocalypse on Wikipedia was In the Book of Revelation, the last book of the New Testament, the revelation which John receives is that of the ultimate victory of good ...
2
votes
1answer
76 views

What does the word, “rascally charm” mean? Can “Rascally” be used as a complimentary modifier?

There was the following comversation in the Vanity Fair’s (November 14 issue) article that came under the title, “Imagined Celebrity Connections: How Beyoncé Responded to Kim Kardashian’s Paper ...
2
votes
3answers
181 views

A word for breathable in the spirit of potable and edible

What would be the appropriate choice to use instead of breathable in line of edible and potable?
1
vote
2answers
69 views

Is there a difference between “scaffold” and “scaffolding”?

Apparently scaffolding is always a substantive while scaffold can be used both as substantive and as verb (to scaffold). I'm interested in the substantive meaning of both words. Google image ...
1
vote
2answers
61 views

“List of Xs” vs “X list”

Is there a difference in meaning between "List of Xs" and "X list"? For example, does "task list" means the same thing as "list of tasks"? What about grammar? Can they be used interchangeably in a ...
-2
votes
2answers
39 views

“Research” vs “research paper.”

Tommy was sitting on his desk, flipping through Mrs. Johnson's last research (paper). Can I omit paper in cases like this? Is it more common to say research paper than just research? (The ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

What is the difference between gibbet and gallows?

I was just reading this communique: We got to the moat - crowds were huge. Went up to the Merchant Marine Memorial on Tower Hill. On the site of the gibbet. I initially thought of giblet ...
1
vote
3answers
65 views

Was I wrong when I used the word “invite” in this context? [closed]

A friend lives in Saudi. I asked her "won't you invite me to your country". She got this question wrong and thought I wanted to be with her in Saudi while visiting places. I just wanted to know ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

What tenses should be used after “in case of”?

What tense should be used after "in case" or "in case of"? For instance, is the following sentence correct? "Just imagine that in case of a dispute with her husband she leaves home."
-2
votes
3answers
87 views

Which is the most formal way to address a man, “Dear Sir” or “Dear Michael”?

I'd like to know which form is more formal and respectful. Can I mention the person's first name instead of writing "Sir" e.g., Dear Michael, or do I only write Dear Sir? I am writing a formal ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

“the following photo is the photo of” or “the following is the photo of…”

Is it common in English to use one word twice, for instance, is it true to say: "the following photo is the photo of our previous home" or is it better to use the sentence below : "the following is ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

Is this the right use of “laid”? [duplicate]

The campfire crackled. Hunter laid in his sleeping bag and gazed up at the stars.
2
votes
3answers
81 views

Could 'traceless' mean 'nowhere to be found'?

In Arabic we say something like 'there is no trace to him' which I presume is equal to the common English idiom or phrase 'nowhere to be found'. However, I was just wondering if the word 'traceless' ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

Use of the Phrase 'Home Tuition' [closed]

Are the following sentences correct: I am an English home tutor. I give home tuition for English to students of classes up to 12th. I offer English home tuition to housewives. I provide home tuition ...
1
vote
2answers
75 views

Do any people distinguish between “analog” and “analogue”?

In my personal usage, the words "analog" and "analogue" are allocated to two different meanings of the word. One refers specifically to non-digital signals, for example: The analog clock reads ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

Can “nepotist” mean the recipient of nepotism? [closed]

I'm looking for a word that describe someone who benefits from nepotism. My initial thought was "nepotist," but I've only ever seen that word used to refer to the giver of benefits, not the ...
6
votes
1answer
378 views

Is there a word for days of mental clarity?

You hear about these a lot in people with Alzheimers. This can also happen to normal people when they eat right and get a good night's sleep and feel very clear headed. I am looking for a more formal ...
4
votes
2answers
62 views

Fin vs flipper?

What is the difference between fins and flippers? While my own intuition says that a fin would be fixed (like, a shark's dorsal fin), and a flipper could be moved about way more (like a turtle's ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

speech balloon vs speech bubble usage and meaning

I am from the UK, and am not familiar with the term "speech balloon". I have always used and heard "speech bubble" instead. Are the 2 meanings the same? Is there some kind of difference in ...
0
votes
2answers
28 views

Is the below usage of “alone” correct?

A friend of mine came to me while I was drinking tea with another person. So two of us were drinking tea and a third person approaching us. The third person said: "You people came alone". His point ...
0
votes
1answer
77 views

Very great or great? [duplicate]

Is it correct to say 'a very great refrigerator'. Isn't just 'a great refrigerator' enough? Should we use 'very' before 'great' as in a very great man, or is it 'a great man'. Why? Thanks. sundaresh
0
votes
1answer
17 views

Use of That-clause with Certain Nouns

Can 'rule' be followed by a that-clause like 'possibility'? Are both of the following sentences correct: There is a possibility that life exists on other planets. There is a rule that people take ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

like + gerund is these sentences are correct [closed]

I studied that I can use like in two ways which is : like + gerund or like + to-infinitive .... I understand this grammar. my question is when I use like in a sentence and there are not just 1 verb ...
10
votes
5answers
1k views

Provide proof or provide a proof (mathematics)

what I want to express is that I want to prove Theorem A. My supervisor told me that I could use the formulation: We provide a proof of Theorem A. A friend of mine, who is a Bachelor of Education ...
-1
votes
1answer
35 views

Use of “one of” with “and” and “or.”

Is either of the following is proper? Are you related to one of George or Mike? Are you related to one of George and Mike? I'd like to ask a yes-or-no question to determine whether you are related ...
6
votes
3answers
513 views

Rose “to a crescendo” or “in a crescendo”?

What is the correct way of saying that the song grew louder gradually? His song rose in a crescendo His song rose to a crescendo.
1
vote
3answers
52 views

Use amount and quantity to replace number?

When we want to express the quantity of something (countable), we may say "The number of something is + number", like "The number of books is 3." Can I say “The quantity of books is 3”? I mean "The ...
3
votes
2answers
76 views

Geographical Usage of “Mate”

I was wondering where the term, "mate," is most popular? When I think of the term, "mate," I think of Australia and England, but I was wondering if anyone else has some input on this. Mate here is ...
3
votes
2answers
113 views

What may be…is

Taken from the Barron's SAT prep book: What may be the world's largest rodent is the capybara, a water loving mammal found throughout much of South America. According to the answers this is a ...