This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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0
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0answers
18 views

Correct use of “immaculate” in a compliment [on hold]

I saw a lady today who just dazzled me, she was so beautiful and pure. She was so divine and flawless. So if I say her beauty was immaculate Will it be appropriate or appreciated for this ...
0
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0answers
11 views

Usage of word for smooth communication [on hold]

Should I use difficult words in speaking or writing.? Or should I use commonly used words?
0
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1answer
37 views

What does 'IN' mean: 'IN your own person or IN the person of any other'?

Source: Prof Michael Sandel, Justice: ..., Episode 06: "MIND YOUR MOTIVE" 47:30 and here Kant distinguishes between persons on the one hand, and things on the other. 47:38: Rational beings are ...
-3
votes
1answer
29 views

Interrogative implicit within a sentence

What is the grammatical term for sentences like: "DO you know where he lives?" "I cant imagine how he did it." In the above sentences, we use what is essentially an interrogative sentence ...
1
vote
2answers
132 views

Meaning of the Black Bile

In following sentence of Mario Puzo's novel "Godfather", there is a reference of word "black bile". "The black bile, sourly bitter, rose in Bonasera's thought, overflowed through tightly clenched ...
-2
votes
1answer
64 views

Why is “crowdness” not a proper English word? [on hold]

Crowdedness is the state of being crowded. So why is "sadness" correct but "sadedness" not correct?
0
votes
1answer
21 views

Can “woodboard” be used as an adjective? [on hold]

Can "woodboard"be used as an adjective? as in woodboard regulator
1
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0answers
54 views

From patriotic chauvinism to male chauvinism

Chauvinism is a term of French origin that: in its original meaning, refers to an exaggerated patriotism and a belligerent belief in national superiority and glory. a contemporary use of ...
1
vote
4answers
275 views

How high is “probability” in terms of likelihood as compared with “possibility”?

There is the following famous line in the book, “Life Lessons” co-authored by Elisabeth Kuble-Ross, an expert on death and dying and her colleague, David Kessler, “We all live with the possibility ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

“hospitality”: does it refer to the guest or the host? [on hold]

Is hospitality about being a good guest, or a good host? Or is it a little bit of both? Would it be the act of being a good host or is it different?
-2
votes
3answers
38 views

Participants' vs Participantses [on hold]

So I know an apostrophe is used to show possession. E.g The participant's book. However, what if I wanted to show possession with several participants? If I was referring to the scores of each ...
2
votes
2answers
160 views

Is “offloading a passenger” idiomatic?

Merriam-Webster and Oxford seem to suggest that we can offload things, not people, yet "offloading a passenger" is quite prevalent in Philippine English. Is it a phrase that somebody from the inner ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Can “replete” be used as verb?

I thought that replete could be used as a verb meaning something like "refill" because of the other verbs sharing the same root plere, such as complete or deplete, which are used as verbs without ...
1
vote
2answers
119 views

Does the word “vain” necessarily have a negative denotation or connotation?

I don't really know how to answer my Brazilian students when they ask me how to say "vaidoso/a" in English. The Portuguese word does not convey a bad idea but "vain" does. Or does it?
4
votes
1answer
67 views

Big man? “Thank you, my big man.”

Once heard someone saying "Thank you, my big man." For whom is to use "big man?" For someone friendly, someone like big brothers, or someone like a guardian? I want to know how that word sounds to you ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Use of the word MUDITA as business name [closed]

Can the use of the word MUDITA as business name create sensitivity/ misunderstanding amongst certain religious/cultural groups?
5
votes
2answers
56 views

Difference between defray, sponsor, and fund?

What is the difference between defray, sponsor, and fund (all verbs)? For me, they are interchangeable: Oxford Dictionary: Defray: Provide money to pay (a cost or expense) The proceeds ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Does the spelling of “brainy” change when suffix is added? [closed]

Which is the correct form, "brainyency" or "brainiency" - when the suffix "ency", which describes the condition of being "brainy" is added? Thanks!
1
vote
4answers
118 views

Single word meaning “containers used to transfer”?

I have a sentence of the form: "Y can be viewed as containers used to transfer X", where X in my case is genetic information. It feels like this sentence could be simplified to something like "Y can ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Is “indifferent of” correct in this sentence? Is it ever correct? Should I replace it with something?

Is "indifferent of" correct in this sentence? Is it ever correct? Should I replace "of" with something? "In regards to hacking, do you approve, disapprove, or are you indifferent of the practice?" ...
1
vote
0answers
83 views

Is there anything awkward in saying “ Prince Charles is now a husband”?

In my English class today my prof gave us a sentence: Prince Charles is now a husband. He then told us to find out if there is anything wrong with this sentence as our homework. Undoubtedly, ...
2
votes
3answers
81 views

Is “Thrashing Win” an oxymoron?

According to me, a "crushing defeat" and a "thrashing win" are opposites. I have always seen the usage of these two terms in sports. But I have seldom seen the usage of "thrashing defeat". Is ...
2
votes
1answer
33 views

“Do not rely” on something, does rely focus on never using “something”?

So, I was talking with a friend of mine a little while back about what "relying" on something means. His take was that to "rely" on something was to completely depend on the "something", as in only ...
0
votes
3answers
43 views

Trustable or trustworthy?

For a long time I have been using trustworthy as the adjective for of trust. However, I recently heard someone say trustable, and it piqued my interest. Apparently it is a word on Merriam-Webster as ...
4
votes
8answers
1k views

Usage and meaning of the word “Ragging” in India

This is my first post here on an unwelcome situation in India, described by a word, "Ragging". Wikipedia article states that: "Ragging is a practice similar to hazing in educational institutions. ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Paternity vs. Paternal vs. Parental Leave [closed]

Which one is the most commonly used to describe a leave taken by a father in the United States?
-1
votes
1answer
36 views

The correct use of I or me [duplicate]

What is the correct way to say?: Her mother, her family and I or I, her mother and her family
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Plaintext vs plain text

I'm trying to figure out how to use the word plaintext when it comes to cryptography. I see different variants of it. Some people use the single-word variant: plaintext. Others type it as plain ...
1
vote
3answers
70 views

“Autistic thinking”

I'm currently editing a transcribed lecture and came across the phrase "autistic thinking". The lecture is about education, and the phrase was used outside the context of psychiatry. I think what the ...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

What is meant by “..waxing literary..”? [closed]

An excerpt: "Here you will find the truly erudite waxing literary on a recently published novel or book." 'erudite' means learned, pedantic, bookish. The meaning of the sentence is clear in ...
2
votes
2answers
84 views

Can “pragmatic” be used as a noun, e.g. “He was a pragmatic”?

Like "He was a romantic." I'm aware of the word pragmatist, but the word pragmatic sounds better in my application.
12
votes
2answers
1k views

What is it called when someone hates disabled people?

I’m having an argument with someone else who keeps telling me that racism is hating any kind of person. He keeps telling me that racism is sexism, etc. I just want to know what the term for a person ...
2
votes
1answer
121 views

Why do we “extend” condolences? [closed]

A relative of mine died and someone used the phrase extend condolences. I know this is a common phrase but it seems very weird. Condolences are something one gives or sends but "extending" something ...
2
votes
1answer
106 views

What is the history of “partner” being used to refer to boyfriend–girlfriend relationships?

In North America (especially Canada and the United States), the word partner is more and more commonly used to describe someone who would otherwise traditionally have been called a boyfriend or a ...
3
votes
5answers
88 views

Use of expression “out of”

Which expression is correct: "he ran out the house" or "he ran out of the house"?
1
vote
2answers
41 views

correct use of yours, possive [closed]

Is this sentence correct; "Thank you for your letter about the missing items in both yours’ and your mother’s homes"?
1
vote
0answers
54 views

Do we use 'competent' to indicate the person or body responsible for something?

EU texts often refer to the 'competent body', 'competent department or 'competent official', meaning the body, department or official that is responsible for the activity in question. For example: ...
1
vote
2answers
76 views

'Ass' (“fool”): vulgar?

My kid heard the word ass somewhere and asked what it meant. My wife said not to use it as it's not a nice word. (She meant that it's vulgar or obscene.) Later (when the kid wasn't around), I objected ...
6
votes
3answers
421 views

Explanation of a sentence in “Adam lay ybounden”

In the carol "Adam lay ybounden", there's a line that goes: As clerkes finden, written in their book Is "finden" the infinitive form of "find"? I thought it should be "found" or maybe "would ...
-1
votes
1answer
25 views

'That' in defining clauses [duplicate]

when should that be used in defining clauses. Is it only used to give more information about a person or something or can it also be used to give more information about a place. Is it informal or ...
1
vote
2answers
67 views

Loquacious vs talkative

What is the different between loquacious and talkative? I don't see much different in their definition: Loquacious: tending to talk a great deal; talkative. Talkative: fond of or given to ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

Informal Version of 'Respectively' [duplicate]

When I say: The board and council meetings will be held on the 5th and the 6th of this month, respectively. it seems to be the proper way to say it and it sounds correct . But when I say: ...
3
votes
1answer
89 views

Does 'extraordinary', 'exceptional', 'outstanding' always carry positive connotations nowadays?

When I take the word 'extraordinary', 'exceptional' and 'outstanding' literally, it simply means something 'out of the ordinary', 'rare and/or unusual', or something which 'stands out from the rest', ...
-1
votes
2answers
29 views

“Imagination is a force that manifests reality” [closed]

Is this a metaphor? Just making sure. I am certain it can be interpreted as one.
3
votes
2answers
215 views

What word sounds similar to “magnanimous” but means “impressively large”?

A friend of mine often uses the word "magnanimous" to mean "large and impressive in a positive way". Examples: "Look at this magnanimous snow!" "He had a magnanimous, bushy eyebrows." I understand ...
3
votes
4answers
109 views

Polite or unrectified placement of the word please

I would please prefer to take both parts of the test on Monday. Is the placement of the word please in this sentence grammatically correct?
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Usage of would have

While reading a document I came across the following sentence: "After 9 months’ time data base administrator will run a job which will copy record from operational to archival data base and as soon as ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Correct usage of the term 'gravity'

If I want to make clear that one object is being affected by the gravity of another object, for example the Earth and the moon. Would I say: The moon has a gravity, just as all mass does. or, ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

What is the scope of the word 'Augment'?

The dictionary meaning of the word Augment is to make (something) greater by adding to it. Is the scope of the word restricted to just quantity or does it extend to quality as well? For example: 'Her ...
2
votes
0answers
48 views

“Lasting” or “with a duration of”? [closed]

I'm editing a very bureaucratic document and I'm trying to make it less bureaucratic. There's a passage that refers to "a session with a duration of 1-2 hours." I want to change it to "a session ...