This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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0
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1answer
22 views

what's the difference between overrun and infest

( Our kitchen is overrun with cockroaches - The barn was infested with rat ) what's the difference between overrun and infest in those examples and if they mean the same which one is more used in ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

How can a person chime? [on hold]

I'd be glad if anyone can explain to me the usage of "chime" in the context of a person saying something. How does that come out if chiming means the sound of a bell? For instance: 'Well' Lisa ...
0
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0answers
25 views

The difference between Related and Relating [on hold]

I would be very happy if you can explain me the difference between related and relating?
0
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0answers
37 views

Weekend/Weekends [migrated]

I would be very happy if you help me to make clear some difficulties in using 'weekend'! What is the difference between a weekend, the weekend, weekends (can we say the weekends?)
0
votes
3answers
21 views

Same day vs Same date

Which is correct. same day last year or same day last year. can we use same day/date instead? eg:we went to the place the same day last year
0
votes
2answers
70 views

If I was or If I were - what to use

I am a student who is studying software engineering and I have a big dream to become a world class developer in upcoming few years. I am planning to start a blog related to software engineering and I ...
1
vote
1answer
23 views

Does 'to prove' necessitate truth?

If I prove something, does it have to be true? I can structure the question more convolutedly: Does successfully proving something depend on the credulity of the audience, or the truth of the ...
0
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0answers
42 views

what are the alternative phrases to express “My leg muscles are mildly sore after jogging”? [on hold]

"sore" is a kind of pain related. Other related words, achy or aching may also similarly mean a pain. After jogging or long hiking, however, many people have an experience in feeling discomfort in ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

What's a word for someone being a tease or playful? [on hold]

Is there a "clean" (non-sexual) word for someone who acts all playful and provocative just so they can get your attention and your compliments? I guess coquettish comes close, but its meaning seems ...
5
votes
1answer
61 views

'Prevaricate' as a synonym for 'vacillate'

There's a lot of motivation here. It boils down to a two-part question: is the usage of 'prevarication' as a synonym for 'vacillation' common, acceptable, and/or preferable; and is there any reason ...
0
votes
2answers
40 views

Is there a rule that backs up the different uses of prepositions “in” vs “at”? [on hold]

Can someone tell me how to differentiate the use of prepositions "in" and "at". So far I can only say there are no rules for this matter...
2
votes
1answer
66 views

Looking for a word describing the act of a person passing an access machine that does not imply if it is an entry or exit

I am translating a computer program interface that deals with granting access to places and records entries and exits of employees. I need to find a word that describes the act of an employee using an ...
0
votes
3answers
60 views

Correct use of the word “legible”

I am of the understanding the term applies only to physical text (print or handwriting). Or at the very least applies only to that which you can see. Not what you can hear. Is this the correct use of ...
1
vote
2answers
71 views

Dove down vs Dove

He laid down four sticks beside this hole, and dove down into the river with one stick. From "Folk-tales of Salishan and Sahaptin tribes" by F. Boas Is second "down" redundant here? From Google ...
0
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0answers
19 views

When to use close vs closest? [closed]

The sentence would read "Select a center close to the user..." or "Select a center closest to the user..." I prefer the first because it reads better to me but I would like to see what others think.
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Which one is more accurate to kindly not taking the offer to take the money? [closed]

What is the difference between decline and refuse ?
4
votes
2answers
218 views

Is having sex a hobby? [on hold]

Wiktionary defines a hobby as An activity that one enjoys doing in one's spare time. Other dictionaries tend to have similar definitions. Viewpoint 1 Some people believe that the word hobby ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

Difference between undoubtably and undoubtedly? [closed]

These two words are often used interchangeably, but I don't believe their meaning is identical. I think I generally know how to use them in context, but could someone explain what he difference is ...
0
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0answers
17 views

Is it correct to say 'have a plan' in the following context? [closed]

Is the following question sounds correct to native English speakers? What did you do for Father's Day last year? Do you have a special plan for your father this year?
1
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2answers
53 views

Using the word "hypothetical' conditionally

Allow me to explain my question. So 'hypothetical', according to Merriam-Webster, is defined as follows: : involving or based on a suggested idea or theory : involving or based on a hypothesis :...
0
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0answers
30 views

Words describing ways in which words are used

What umbrella term can be used to describe the collection of writing techniques encompassing "irony, sarcasm, satire, simily, allegory, etc.", indicating the way in which words are used within a text, ...
1
vote
2answers
110 views

Meaning of “available soon” (from a test item)

stackexchange! I've been referring to this site for a while now and have finally decided to join you all. This is a semantics and use question about the phrase "available soon" that appeared as part ...
0
votes
3answers
90 views

“Cowardly” as an adverb [closed]

Is "cowardly" both an adjective and an adverb? Question inspired by this awkward error message from Homebrew. Error: Cowardly refusing to 'sudo brew install' Surely there is another way to ...
1
vote
1answer
90 views

What does “drop and give me zen” mean? [closed]

What does "drop and give me zen" mean? Maybe it's some kind of idiom. Can you explain it to me?
-1
votes
1answer
30 views

Usage of need, for mandatory situation [closed]

I am not native english speaker. I had a sentence to translate into english. The sentence was about renting. The person the mail is sent to didn't pay his rent and he must pay it until 27/06/2016. The ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

The usage of “Imagine”

Normally we say "imagine that you are doing st..." Right? So I wrote in my paper "Imagine that you were living when Edison invented the light bulb..." But my teacher crossed it out and instead she ...
5
votes
2answers
74 views

What is a word for something that you desperately want and/or craved for, but NEVER GOT?

Take this situation; Everyone was given ice cream at the birthday party, except for Todd. After Todd got home, he felt very disheartened that he never got the chance to taste the ice-cream there. He ...
0
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0answers
38 views

Do you say 'decide a judgement'? [migrated]

We can make, determeine, inform, confirm, etc... a judgement. Can we 'decide a judgement?' I wonder if native speakers say 'decide a judgement'.
3
votes
1answer
36 views

Origin of “even you” without connotations of surprise/insult/praise? (Indian English)

I live in southern India, and I've noticed that in a Indian English, the word "even" can be used without indicating surprise, as it does elsewhere. Some examples: Even you should be able to ...
9
votes
1answer
94 views

What is the origin and extent of the Indian English usage of “only” to emphasize something?

I live in southern India, and for a long time I've been curious about this phenomena that I've observed. Indian English uses the word "only" in a special way. They use it to emphasize things. Sort ...
0
votes
2answers
66 views

What too-most means in “It was, too-most of his friends” [closed]

In a book(The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by: Douglas Adams) I am reading the following is said about a person: "The thing that used to worry him most was the fact that people always ...
1
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0answers
35 views

Is “of all” an adverb in “She behaved the worst of all” & “She is the worst of all”?

"the worst" in "She is the worst of all" is superlative adjective. "the worst" in "She behaved the worst of all" is superlative adverb. My question is: What is the function the "of all"? Is it an ...
2
votes
2answers
83 views

Distinguish twins vs distinguish between twins

I'm confused about the use of the word "Distinguish". The link shows an example sentence where the verb is used as an intransitive verb: Can the child distinguish between right and wrong? But I ...
2
votes
1answer
71 views

What is the meaning of “being on birth control”?

I read about it all over the place and they say it is a way of preventing pregnancy using contraceptives like condoms, pills, etc. However, in a YouTube video, I heard someone recommending condom use ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Word-usage: Could the word “multiple stars” include binary stars?

This question might be off-topic here, but concerning English usage. We are translating some illustrated book for kids about astronomy, and then have a question as in the title. Referring to ...
1
vote
5answers
91 views

What makes an estimate “conservative?”

When estimating (time, for example), it's common to either ask for or offer a "conservative" estimate. Irrespective of political connotations, how does "conservative" describe a given estimate? Is a ...
10
votes
1answer
243 views

From the Spanish “xaquima” to the AmE “hackamore”

A hackamore: is a type of animal headgear which does not have a bit. Instead, it has a special type of noseband that works on pressure points on the face, nose, and chin. It is most commonly ...
-2
votes
1answer
42 views

Ask about passive voice [closed]

Which is correct? John F.Kennedy became the 35th president of the USA in 1960-the youngest man ever was elected. or the youngest man ever to be elected
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Use of “only” and “alone”

How would you use "only" or "alone" to denote whether something happened exclusively in one place? For example "It happened only in the United States" or "It happened in the United States alone". The ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

To use “Commit Suicide” [closed]

Does "commit suicide" necessarily mean that the person referred to actually died? Or, does it only mean that she tries to kill herself?
0
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0answers
25 views

Is it normal to use the word “rivalize” for describing, e.g., competing activity?

I would like to edit a phrase in an article describing some mathematical simulation of concurrent struggle on markets. It would be something like: ...if metallurgical enterprises would adhere ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

So, only “Gone” adds an extra meaning when talking about the movement; but “go”, “went”, “going”,etc don't have that extra meaning? Is that right?

Ok, the verb "to go" can be used in many tenses: She goes to the supermarket. She is going to the supermarket. She went to the supermarket. She will go to the supermarket. She is going to go to ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Does anyone use “misconstruct” (instead of “misconstrue”) anymore?

Is it ever correct to say: I misconstruct the truth That is, to use misconstruct as a synonym for misconstrue? My research indicates that misconstruct was once used, i.e. is now archaic: ...
0
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0answers
17 views

User's Guide vs. User's Manual vs. Manual [duplicate]

I am discussing with my colleagues whether a 300+ page book that describes how to use a product we manufacture should be called a User's Manual, Manual or User's Guide, and how it should be referred ...
0
votes
2answers
52 views

Meaning of “if not” in a sentence

I don't understand the meaning of "if not" and grammar of the sentence in bold: As early as the 14th century, the organ supplied polyphony, in which case the odd-numbered verses of text were ...
-1
votes
0answers
34 views

Is this a solecism, an auto-correct failure, or something else?

I'm just looking for a word to describe the type of error in the quote below. Solecism is the closest I can find/think of. Relax and watch alcoholic repressed insurance cops harassing tragically ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Adjective for describing a forehand shot in tennis that requires a lot of effort

I'm looking for an adjective to describe a forehand shot in tennis that requires a lot of effort (from hard hitter, baseliner, e.g. Thiem, Del Potro...) as opposing to an effortless, elegant forehand ...
1
vote
2answers
75 views

What are the best words to describe subjects being compared?

I tried to Google this but no luck so far. I was wondering if there was proper words to describe the comparison of 2 subjects? The first subject would be the object being compared in relation to the ...
3
votes
2answers
56 views

Noun meaning “something destructive”?

I am trying to think of a noun that describes things that are destructive. More specifically, a noun describing all devices and chemicals that cause destruction, encompassing explosives and chemicals ...
0
votes
0answers
55 views

Does “For/With me, I think …” at the beginning of a sentence make any sense?

I hear a lot of Vietnamese students say: "For me, I think ..." or "With me, I think ..." when they are practicing English. Example: "For/With me, I think smoking is bad." I think they ...