This tag is for questions about correctly using a word.

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1
vote
1answer
15 views

Using only a direct object with the verb “give”

Is it possible to use the verb give with only a direct object? For example, Could you give the definition? Or need I to add an indirect object, so the sentence becomes Could you give me the ...
-1
votes
0answers
37 views

Pseudo-subject verb agreement [duplicate]

Please, I want to know the meaning of pseudo-subject and its agreement with verbs. Please, show me the rules even without examples.
1
vote
1answer
49 views

Is it correct to use multiple adjectives that mean the same thing as one adjective?

I came across this quote from some popular guy who likes to use big words and I was wondering if it's correct. Their vacuous posturing, pharissaical sanctimonies and sadducceical homilies now ...
1
vote
2answers
39 views

-er for two, -est for three or more?

I believe that if, for instance, you have two kids, you have an older and a younger - if you have three or more, you have an oldest, you have a youngest (and whatever is in between). I hear people ...
0
votes
2answers
67 views

How is that correct: “speed is faster” or “prices are cheaper”

Read in a somewhat reliable source - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clearing_(finance): speed of trades is much faster... Also heard once or twice: prices in this store are cheaper Does it sound ...
1
vote
2answers
54 views

How far out does “in-law” go? [on hold]

The sister to a husband becomes the wife's sister-in-law. If the sister in-law was to marry a woman, would she also become the wife's sister-in-law? If so can you keep calling the family of your ...
0
votes
2answers
63 views

Pardon my ignorance, but how would the word 'ignore' convert to a noun in this context? [duplicate]

I was talking to a co-worker about the fact that he ignored certain guidelines when writing his code. He is fairly aware of the established guidelines and a well-defined copy of the same is present ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Correct use(s) of “Name, Founder” [on hold]

When listing a name and title on for example a business card, does "Name, Founder" mean: "the founder" "a founder" Both
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Is there a difference between “note-taking” & “notation”?

Is there a difference between "note-taking" & "notation" when referring to the process of writing notes? I've read the dictionary definitions and I'm still not clear on it.
2
votes
1answer
81 views

How is 'Tacenda' used in a sentence?

I am confused about the usage of this word. I know the meaning it conveys. Help?
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Questions about Grammar (Application Letter) [closed]

I have a question about some sentences that I wrote in an application letter, but my teacher said they were wrong, and I don't undestand why. (I am not a native English speaker) Thank you! 1.I am ...
1
vote
3answers
88 views

Is there a word for “not cremated”?

I am trying to come up with a term to represent human remains that have not been cremated; they will be buried in a casket. I tried casketed, but that's not actually word although it sounds good. ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

What is the difference between interaction, communication, conversation, and discussion? [closed]

I think all of these are kinds of communication. But can't think the difference between the other terms
1
vote
2answers
43 views

Formal/informal word for “something which is hard to deal with”?

Is there any formal/informal word which possibly reflects the meaning of "something which is hard to deal with"?
-2
votes
0answers
66 views

The use of a word “après” in writing [closed]

I met a couple of times that french words are borrowed and used in English. I wonder if it is ok to use the word après. I know that I can go without it, but I am writing an essay and just feel that it ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Adding an 's' to day [duplicate]

Should it be 30 day free trial or 30 days free trial? I believe it should be 30 day free trial but I can't find the grammar rule to back this up. I am trying to explain it to someone who is not a ...
12
votes
13answers
4k views

Word for “sitting down heavily?”

Example: Mom came over and [...] on the bed, making my head bounce on the pillow.
2
votes
1answer
51 views

Me, myself, or I?

a) I am surprised that someone other than I had a cat named Hamlet. or b) I am surprised that someone other than myself had a cat named Hamlet. or c) I am surprised that someone ...
0
votes
3answers
70 views

Can I say “pretty readable”? [closed]

I'd like to use the word "readable" with another one, can it be "pretty"? If not, what other adjectives can be used with "readable"? Thanks guys!
0
votes
2answers
26 views

“She allowed her life to be a circumstance of her illness”

I never witnessed where she allowed her life to be a circumstance of her illness Is circumstance used in the correct manner? I want to say she didn't use her illness as an excuse to be sick... ...
1
vote
1answer
112 views

“Poorer” vs. “more poor”

As a non-native speaker I am curious about the everyday usage of more poor in contrast to poorer. The dictionary dictates poorer as the correct form, with some allowing both forms. According to ...
17
votes
6answers
1k views

Is a “Tale” less factual than a “Story”?

I am preparing a press release, and so far the headline of the press release is: A SOVIET LABOR CAMP SURVIVOR’S TALE A colleague called the word "tale" into question, since this is a book about a ...
9
votes
4answers
2k views

A cell phone company talking about the dangers of texting — irony or not? [duplicate]

There was a presentation at our school about texting and driving. It was held by AT&T, a cell phone company. Would it be considered ironic that a cell phone company is talking about the dangers of ...
3
votes
4answers
47 views

Is this correct use of 'respectively'?

I am accustomed to using the word 'respectively' as follows: Jack and Jill went to the hill and the pharmacy, respectively. and this is the way I've always seen it being used. Is it correct to ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

So, why is “so” being used like this? [duplicate]

I first noticed it during an interview a journalist was doing with a presidential candidate. The journalist asked questions. Each time the candidate started his answer with the word "so". Now I am ...
0
votes
3answers
46 views

Mental lapse preferred to Synapse lapse? [closed]

My friend used the term 'synapse lapse' the other day to describe what would be usually called a 'mental lapse'. Is this an acceptable term? I found no results in the Ngram viewer. It doesn't seem to ...
3
votes
2answers
97 views

What is the etymological justification for taking the grammatical term “pluperfect” and turning it into an adjective meaning 'more than perfect"? [duplicate]

I'm interested in the usage of the word pluperfect in the following passage from Thomas Harris’s crime thriller, The Silence of the Lambs. Jerry Burroughs of the National Crime Information Center ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Which is right: “3-peak” or “3-peaks”? [duplicate]

If I want to express something has 3 peaks, I should say "3-peak something" or "3-peaks something"?
-1
votes
1answer
42 views

Is it correct to say “an auspicious situation”?

Auspicious, as defined by Merriam-Webster means - showing or suggesting that future success is likely. I was learning about the correct usage of the word and found the following usages to be correct : ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

“And” vs “as well as”

Although the words and and as well as seems similar but I make mistake on using them as synonym. What is the difference in the usage of and and as well as?
0
votes
2answers
52 views

Usage of the word “introspect”

I am trying to write a sentence to mean that something made me think deeply about myself and I would really like to use the word introspect. I came up with: During several instances of reading ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

What is “lay governance” in the context of higher education?

I am looking for a basic definition to understand it. I see it used in texts mainly about US higher education systems and governance.
0
votes
1answer
47 views

What's the difference between patent and obvious?

Patent is used a lot more in "serious" matters, like legal breaches, such as a "patent breach of law," but does that really mean anything? Does "patent" just sound more refined?
1
vote
2answers
47 views

Usage of the word “not”?

I want to know how can I put the word "not" in these sentences : Would you open the door? ** I know that I can say:"Would you close the door?" but I want to use the word "not". I wonder if you ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Difference between audience and audiences? [closed]

I've heard some people say the word audiences in conversation. How does audiences differ from audience and when do you use it?
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Whom did you meet? [duplicate]

I am confused to use the word "whom" in a sentence.Is the above sentence correct? Give me a bit of your mind at what contexts we generally use whom with proper examples.
0
votes
1answer
53 views

How would you say e.g. creativity isn't something that only belongs to graphic designers?

Can't think of the word or phrase to use, can anyone help me? Creativity isn't solely the domain of graphic designers? Something to do with prerogative?
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Does a phrase “I'm gonna raise a whim flag on this one” make any sense? [closed]

Does the phrase “I’m gonna raise a whim flag on this one” make any sense? Put simply, I want a phrase to have the same meaning as “I’m going to resign from further engagement in this matter”.
0
votes
2answers
49 views

What's the difference between the verbs “recruit” and “employ”? [closed]

What's the difference between the verbs "recruit" and "employ? Why is it used so in sentences "Our company is flourishing and we recruit more than a handred workers. Every year we employ 10 more."
2
votes
2answers
80 views

What is the word for “technical usurpation of an old word”?

Is there a word for "usurpation, rather than merely borrowing, of an old word by later, technical usage"? If so, what is it? For example, of old, the English word summer meant "that season of the ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Is oaken really a word? [closed]

I read a lot. I occasionally see "oaken" used to describe something made out of oak. It's used more frequently in historical or romantic fiction. Does common usage make it right?
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Why not “virtual estate” instead of “screen real estate”?

In English usage in many disciplines, like articles on Web designing, people frequently use the word "screen real estate" or "viewport (browser window size) real estate" or even "mobile or browser ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

Is knowledge of the meaning of the word “ubiquity” ubiquitously considered to be ubiquitous? [closed]

Please pardon the pun. I was in a conversation on a game’s online chat, talking about how common an item was, and used the word “ubiquitous” to describe it. But, much to my surprise, the point of ...
0
votes
2answers
58 views

What does this usage of “with” mean? [closed]

I'm sorry for asking what will be such a simple question but I'm not sure exactly how With is used in sentences where that's the first word. Is that what it took to fall in love with someone? ...
-1
votes
0answers
20 views

Having said that, consequently vs conversely

Should "having said that" always be used in place of "conversely" or can it also be used in place of "consequently"? Meaning, in the structure: X. Having said that, Y. Does Y have to somehow ...
3
votes
2answers
55 views

Use of the word conciliated in Call of the wild

"as he looked at each brutal performance, the lesson was driven home to Buck: a man with a club was a lawgiver, a master to be obeyed, though not necessarily conciliated" from Call of the Wild. I do ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

What is the origin of “Why don't you…” as a suggestion or command?

Frequently, in spoken dialogue one hears the above phrase used as a suggestion to the listener (or sometimes more strongly, as a command): Why don't you give me that book? Why don't you go to the ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Participation/participating and a couple more questions

I'm helping my sister to prepare a cover letter for her job application and I have problems with a couple of sentences: 1) Something seems wrong in the sentence and I don't know what exactly: The ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

What is a word for doing something that you don't want to do?

I am reading Of Mice and Men, and I am trying to come up with a word that describes how George manages to shoot Lennie at the end of the book. I have come up with Self Discipline, and Overcoming ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

How do you use the word “arguably”? [duplicate]

Does arguably mean "something could be argued", or "could be arguable, is debatable or questionable"? But more often it seems to emphasize an adjective, for example: It is arguably the best, the ...