This tag is for questions about the correct order of words in a phrase, or a sentence.

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3
votes
3answers
207 views

Object pronoun: me and John, or John and me?

When using ourselves and another person as the subject of a sentence, we use their name first (like "John and I"); but when the same two people become the object of a sentence, which order should the ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Use of “as well” in the middle of the sentence

I was wondering if the use of "as well" in the middle of the sentence is correct in formal English. Here is the particular sentence I am writing: I got ample opportunities to communicate with a ...
2
votes
2answers
21 views

Is it ok to use one of either?

Is it ok to use "one of either"? The reason I am asking is because it always seems like there are always some subjects before the word "either" in that case like this: You may use one of either ...
1
vote
2answers
87 views

“I never was” vs. “I was never”

What is the difference between "I never was" and "I was never"? It seems that there is a subtle difference, but I can't quite grasp it. Is one of them informal? For example: I never was a good ...
0
votes
2answers
89 views

Order of noun + modifying noun

Which one is correct or preferred? The command /reload is... < some description > The /reload command is... < some description >
-1
votes
2answers
165 views

Placing “first” in a sentence; would it change the meaning?

How does the meaning of the following two sentences differ? I first wanted to tell you about it. I wanted to tell you about it first.
1
vote
1answer
69 views

“The problem is who can we get to replace her” vs. “The problem is who we can get to replace her”

"The problem is who can we get to replace her" vs. "The problem is who we can get to replace her" Which one is correct and why?
1
vote
1answer
81 views

order or adjuncts and adjectives

The more thought I give about the order of adjuncts and adjectives before a noun, the less sense it all makes. Not a native speaker, but using English on a daily basis. For instance, in "Relational ...
0
votes
1answer
14 views

I was there by your side vs I was by your side there

She was by my side in the building. She was in the building by my side. The first sentence says that she was in the building, and she was staying beside me. The second sentence says ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Is there a difference in meaning between “dedicated solely” and “solely dedicated”?

Rock Creek Conservancy is the only organization solely dedicated to Rock Creek Park. Rock Creek Conservancy is the only organization dedicated solely to Rock Creek Park. Do these statements mean the ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Putting descriptive words in reverse order

There are sentences like this. He was a calm and nice person. He talked with vaguely old and British expression. I always thought that since "calm and nice" is not a phrase, it came ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

“Within this question I am asking about word order” or “I am asking about word order within this question”?

Are any of these formats regarding the word ordering within the sentence generally preferred to the other in general writing? Are there any special considerations if a more formal style is preferred ...
-1
votes
1answer
30 views

It's an expected label or It's an label expected. what's the difference?

Can anyone help me analyze the difference between the following two sentences? It's an expected label. It's a label expected.
-1
votes
1answer
3k views

“They had already decided what to do” vs. “they had decided what to do already”

I was surprised that they had already decided what to do. I was surprised that they had decided what to do already. Which sentence is correct?
-1
votes
1answer
5k views

“for which” usage

I am writing comments to my algorithm and I used this sentence to describe one variable. But I am not entirely sure if it makes sense and if I used commas right. id of node, for which, program is ...
-2
votes
1answer
34 views

Help! So as not to vs. so (adjective) not to

I have seen the following phrases "so as not to" and "so (adjective) as not to" in articles before, but I don't know how to use these two phrase correctly. Any advice or insight would be very helpful. ...
-2
votes
1answer
44 views

How to interpret and adjective followed by two nouns

Given the following sentence: Please input the path to the main plugin file How should it be read? I can think of two possible ways to interpret main plugin file: The most important file of ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Intricate example of usage of word “respectively”

I am uncertain about the most appropriate location of the word "respectively" in the following example. Please note that models M2 and M3 are referring to the two models in which condition A was ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

Modifying noun after noun?

At first I wrote When executing a read(v) operation, the state machines exchange optimistic state. I know that is correct, but I wonder if the following would also be acceptable in a technical ...
0
votes
0answers
71 views

Position of subordinate clause in a sentence

Which sentences are correct and according to what grammar rule? Throughout this text, we will use an example of sustainability management at a large university. We will use throughout this ...
0
votes
0answers
58 views

Where does the verb go?

Where does the verb go in the sentence below to make it grammatically correct? Please let me know what are the differences. Please let me know what the differences are.
-2
votes
0answers
28 views

Two flights delay? or two flight delays?

If I would like to say that one airline stated that there were two flights delay due to an engine failure, should it be “two flight delays”? or “two flights delay”?