This tag is for questions about the correct order of words in a phrase, or a sentence.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

2
votes
2answers
105 views

Where should “a lot” be placed in a sentence?

Which of these is right? I like to play with my dog a lot. I like a lot to play with my dog. I like to play a lot with my dog. Any of the above. I mean, where does a lot go in there? I searched ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

However in the middle of a sentence

I wonder if I can use however like in this sentence: The lecture however does cover a lot of information, still doesn't explain the main subject. Sounds a bit awkward to me, but it still seems ...
1
vote
2answers
69 views

In what order should you say people's names?

I know that when you include someone, you say their name first. For example: "John and I went to the beach" How do you order the names when there are more than one additional people? For example: ...
-1
votes
1answer
38 views

I care not (for these things) vs. I don't care

Is the expression "I care not" grammatically correct? Do I care not and I don't care have the same meaning?
2
votes
3answers
45 views

Is it wrong to use 'not" in sentences that have an “all…not” form

All of the women in the district did not vote for the lone female candidate. What, if any, is the semantic problem in the above sentence. I was suggested the below sentence by my senior peers. ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

Placement of adjective “only”

I have the following sentence and three versions to write it: Ensure string only contains printable ASCII characters. Ensure string contains only printable ASCII characters. Ensure string ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Delayed relative clause

Consider the following phrase taken from a draft of my master's thesis: In this chapter, the fundamental physiological principles will be presented that underlie the mathematical models and ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Order of “noun + describing noun”

Which one is correct or preferred? The command /reload is... < some description > The /reload command is... < some description >
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Position of always/continuously in these sentences

I have two sentences: 1.- On and beneath the earth's surface, new rock is made and old rock is destroyed ______________. 2.- The rock cycle occurs ______________________, over millions of years. ...
4
votes
3answers
700 views

“to not get” vs “not to get”

I came across this sentence in an article, "As she speaks of her family, friends and life, it's difficult to not get that 'feel good' mood." I'm wondering if the following sentence could also mean ...
1
vote
2answers
49 views

Word order in question with very long subject

The normal word order for a wh- question in English is: wh- + auxiliary + subject + verb. Hence the sentence below should be correct: What might the consequences of the loss of diversity of plant ...
0
votes
1answer
134 views

looking for appositive that-which phrases

I asked sentences having an appositive that-which phrase like the following sentence in English Language Learners. The insect propagates best near "disturbed land," that which is being cultivated ...
0
votes
1answer
77 views

“been often” vs “often been” [closed]

Which of these is the correct form: techniques have been often used for post-processing or techniques have often been used for post-processing
0
votes
2answers
56 views

“Is it for when?” vs. “When is it for?”

I always get confused which of the following is correct: Is it for when? When is it for? Or are there further ways to ask for when something is needed. The it in question is an ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

How to properly write sentence with double words

I commonly come across sentences where I have to write the same word twice such as, This is what I've been looking for for a long time. and in these cases I just try to rewrite the sentence to ...
2
votes
3answers
85 views

order of adjectives - deleted recent questions vs recent deleted questions

From what is introduced here, "recent" is a kind of age and "deleted" seems to be a kind of specific opinion, so this structure seems to be correct: "deleted recent questions". Actually I was ...
1
vote
0answers
25 views

“Above thing” or “thing above” [duplicate]

I don't know which is correct, it seems both can be used? "The above gun shows..." or "the gun above shows.." Also the below gun or the gun below, which is correct?
5
votes
3answers
212 views

should be always or should always be? [duplicate]

I am not a native speaker, I do not know how to say this properly: "It should be always on", or "It should always be on"? Is there any difference?
14
votes
4answers
15k views

“Can easily be” vs. “can be easily” — what's the difference?

I'm wondering what the difference is between: It can easily be obtained. It can be easily obtained. Also, what's the preferred way to write it? If there is any... I googled for both ...
2
votes
2answers
168 views

Why is “till” used in this expression: “If we don't leave till after lunch…”?

If we don't leave till after lunch we'll be cutting it very fine. I understand it to mean: "If we don't leave after lunch, we'll be cutting it very fine." (In the event of our not leaving ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

order or adjuncts and adjectives

The more thought I give about the order of adjuncts and adjectives before a noun, the less sense it all makes. Not a native speaker, but using English on a daily basis. For instance, in "Relational ...
1
vote
2answers
135 views

What is differences between “level” and “degree”?

When we can use degree? And also when we can use level? Are they similar or not? For example in this sentence The way to tell a true unit from a degree of something is to look at the zero ...
12
votes
6answers
6k views

“All is not lost” vs “Not all is lost”

I guess I've been in mathematics for far too long, and I tend to use the phrase "Not all is lost" as the negative of "All is lost". To me the phrase "All is not lost" suggests that nothing is lost. ...
1
vote
2answers
37 views

where to place *further* , *considering further*

As the closing sentence of a cover letter for an application I would like to write the sentence I would appreciate your further considering my application and remain... but is this correct, or ...
2
votes
1answer
130 views

A correct way to place a verb in a “double” question

I'm not sure what the correct way for placing a verb in such cases is: "May I ask what Australia’s policy is regarding this scheme?" or should it be "May I ask what is Australia’s policy regarding ...
7
votes
4answers
6k views

Is it incorrect to say, 'Give me it'?

Is it incorrect to say, 'Give me it' ? I am told that it is and one should always say, 'Give it me'?
1
vote
1answer
25k views

Is it correct to start a sentence with “with” in English?

Is it correct to use with at the beginning of a sentence? Here's an example sentence: With the development of the economy, living standards improved. To my eyes this looks unnatural; I would ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Wedge between the related verbs?

At the beginning of 1807, based on information gathered from Burr’s correspondence allegedly showing that he had begun preparations for a large-scale military expedition, the former vice ...
0
votes
1answer
102 views

Confusion with alphabetical order [closed]

Assuming an alphabetical list is shown as: Lee, Suhyun to Li, Yibo Li, Yige to Mace, Jamie If my last name was Lin, where would I fit?
0
votes
2answers
1k views

“Could you please repeat?” or “Could you repeat please?”

While teaching my students in a elementary school, I asked them to use the question Could you repeat (that), please? However, the next day I received a letter from a mother saying the correct ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Verb + not = do not verb ? What is the gramatical explanation?

I have long been puzzled by the usage of 'verb + not'. For example, Kennedy said, "... my fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country." The Bible ...
6
votes
5answers
731 views

Why is this sentence: “Additional nine features were added…” incorrect?

I am trying to explain to a colleague why the sentence: Additional nine features were added to the dig is incorrect. I have said you can say "An additional nine features...", "Nine additional ...
1
vote
5answers
4k views

“Introduce person to object” or “introduce object to person”?

I'd like to introduce you to this technology. I'd like to introduce this tech to you. Which one is right and what are appropriate uses?
3
votes
2answers
129 views

The Order of Modification in English Nouns, Preceding or Succeeding? [closed]

As I don't know the exact linguistic terms, what I mean my "preceding" and "succeeding" in modifying nouns is as follows. Preceding : delicious food, long way, kind person, et cetera Succeeding : ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Are “prop the door open” and “prop open the door” both correct?

So I feel like "prop open the door" is correct over "prop the door open" because the former splits the verbs, but the latter sounds better to me, for reasons I don't know. Is either correct over the ...
4
votes
4answers
21k views

How does one write the name of a married female and spouse in a list of classmates?

In a list of classmates, how is the name of a married female and spouse listed? Is the female given name or her husband's given name written first? How is the maiden name shown?
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Ordering prepositional phrases

I have rewritten a sentence like the one below several times, and I could not seem to put the prepositional phrases in an order that sounded correct to me. Is there a better way to construct this ...
3
votes
1answer
749 views

Inversion with “many times” at the beginning of a sentence

I am having a discussion with my friend. I said, "Many times I have seen him washing his car." He says it should be, "Many times have I seen him washing his car. Much like "Often do I see him", and ...
1
vote
1answer
108 views

“You still have got …” vs “You've still got”

In a discussion on Hacker News, titled: Not on a Social Network? You’ve Still Got a Privacy Problem somebody commented that it should say: Not on a Social Network? You Still Have Got a ...
5
votes
5answers
990 views

3 meter square area vs 3 square meter area

A. 3 meter square area B. 3 square meter area I’m wondering what the easiest way is to clearly express the difference between A and B above. In A, one side is 3 (meters). In B, one side is ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Punctuation around the word “namely”

It seems somehow tricky to apply the right punctuation when it comes to the word namely. I got the following advice: Search globally for "namely", and add a comma after it, as well as a comma, a ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

“I actually might have to X” vs. “I might actually have to X” vs. “I might have to actually X”

Even if there are four fan headers on the motherboard my computer case accommodates six fans (3x140mm, 3x120mm) so I actually might have to purchase an external fan hub. Where should I put the ...
3
votes
2answers
214 views

Can I use the adjective as the first word?

Is it okay if I rearrange the sentence The apple on the table was green or The green apple was on the table to put the adjective in front, as the first word, like Green, was the apple on ...
4
votes
4answers
789 views

Why do some questions not start with an auxiliary verb?

When I learned English, my teachers told me that all questions must have an auxiliary verb at the beginning, just like Are you mad? or Is she playing? do. But when watching some movies or talking ...
1
vote
0answers
55 views

word order of here + adverb + noun, e.g. here used method

I have been encountering several examples (in scientific papers), where people used constructions like "the here used method", "the here investigated case", etc.. I have been thinking that it is ...
2
votes
4answers
572 views

Does adverb placement affect meaning?

He swam slowly to the island. He slowly swam to the island. Some experts say that there is a “slight difference” in meaning. Would you please tell me that difference?
3
votes
2answers
663 views

position of “only”

Which sentence is correct? (A) Mosquito larvae can only be seen through a microscope. (B) Mosquito larvae can be only seen through a microscope. (C) Mosquito larvae can be seen only through ...
2
votes
3answers
407 views

“put your coat on” and “put on your coat” but not “depend on someone” and “depend someone on*”

Why can you say "put on your coat" and "put your coat on" but not "depend on someone" and "depend someone on*"? Why are adverbs ("on" in the first sentence) mobile, whereas prepositions ("on" in the ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

“opted not to” vs “opted to not” [closed]

Is there a difference between "opted not to" and "opted to not"? Which is correct to use in this example: "I opted to not|opted not to receive messages from this mailing list".
0
votes
2answers
130 views

I will learn better English — should it be “I will learn English better.”

Somehow, I think "better English" is incorrect, because I think there isn't better English; English is English. But I hear this phrase from other ESL students a lot. Is this correct way of saying it? ...