This tag is for questions about the correct order of words in a phrase, or a sentence.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
5answers
4k views

“Introduce person to object” or “introduce object to person”?

I'd like to introduce you to this technology. I'd like to introduce this tech to you. Which one is right and what are appropriate uses?
4
votes
5answers
126 views

Can you use the word 'additional' to start a sentence without an article?

I am trying to explain to a colleague why the sentence: Additional nine features were added to the dig is incorrect. I have said you can say "An additional nine features...", "Nine additional ...
3
votes
2answers
76 views

The Order of Modification in English Nouns, Preceding or Succeeding? [on hold]

As I don't know the exact linguistic terms, what I mean my "preceding" and "succeeding" in modifying nouns is as follows. Preceding : delicious food, long way, kind person, et cetera Succeeding : ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

Are “prop the door open” and “prop open the door” both correct?

So I feel like "prop open the door" is correct over "prop the door open" because the former splits the verbs, but the latter sounds better to me, for reasons I don't know. Is either correct over the ...
4
votes
4answers
20k views

How does one write the name of a married female and spouse in a list of classmates?

In a list of classmates, how is the name of a married female and spouse listed? Is the female given name or her husband's given name written first? How is the maiden name shown?
1
vote
1answer
47 views

Ordering prepositional phrases

I have rewritten a sentence like the one below several times, and I could not seem to put the prepositional phrases in an order that sounded correct to me. Is there a better way to construct this ...
3
votes
1answer
681 views

Inversion with “many times” at the beginning of a sentence

I am having a discussion with my friend. I said, "Many times I have seen him washing his car." He says it should be, "Many times have I seen him washing his car. Much like "Often do I see him", and ...
1
vote
1answer
96 views

“You still have got …” vs “You've still got”

In a discussion on Hacker News, titled: Not on a Social Network? You’ve Still Got a Privacy Problem somebody commented that it should say: Not on a Social Network? You Still Have Got a ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Verb + not = do not verb ? What is the gramatical explanation?

I have long been puzzled by the usage of 'verb + not'. For example, Kennedy said, "... my fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country." The Bible ...
5
votes
5answers
783 views

3 meter square area vs 3 square meter area

A. 3 meter square area B. 3 square meter area I’m wondering what the easiest way is to clearly express the difference between A and B above. In A, one side is 3 (meters). In B, one side is ...
1
vote
1answer
34 views

order or adjuncts and adjectives

The more thought I give about the order of adjuncts and adjectives before a noun, the less sense it all makes. Not a native speaker, but using English on a daily basis. For instance, in "Relational ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Punctuation around the word “namely”

It seems somehow tricky to apply the right punctuation when it comes to the word namely. I got the following advice: Search globally for "namely", and add a comma after it, as well as a comma, a ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

“I actually might have to X” vs. “I might actually have to X” vs. “I might have to actually X”

Even if there are four fan headers on the motherboard my computer case accommodates six fans (3x140mm, 3x120mm) so I actually might have to purchase an external fan hub. Where should I put the ...
2
votes
1answer
91 views

A correct way to place a verb in a “double” question

I'm not sure what the correct way for placing a verb in such cases is: "May I ask what Australia’s policy is regarding this scheme?" or should it be "May I ask what is Australia’s policy regarding ...
3
votes
2answers
177 views

Can I use the adjective as the first word?

Is it okay if I rearrange the sentence The apple on the table was green or The green apple was on the table to put the adjective in front, as the first word, like Green, was the apple on ...
4
votes
4answers
688 views

Why do some questions not start with an auxiliary verb?

When I learned English, my teachers told me that all questions must have an auxiliary verb at the beginning, just like Are you mad? or Is she playing? do. But when watching some movies or talking ...
1
vote
0answers
41 views

word order of here + adverb + noun, e.g. here used method

I have been encountering several examples (in scientific papers), where people used constructions like "the here used method", "the here investigated case", etc.. I have been thinking that it is ...
2
votes
4answers
541 views

Does adverb placement affect meaning?

He swam slowly to the island. He slowly swam to the island. Some experts say that there is a “slight difference” in meaning. Would you please tell me that difference?
3
votes
2answers
591 views

position of “only”

Which sentence is correct? (A) Mosquito larvae can only be seen through a microscope. (B) Mosquito larvae can be only seen through a microscope. (C) Mosquito larvae can be seen only through ...
2
votes
3answers
291 views

“put your coat on” and “put on your coat” but not “depend on someone” and “depend someone on*”

Why can you say "put on your coat" and "put your coat on" but not "depend on someone" and "depend someone on*"? Why are adverbs ("on" in the first sentence) mobile, whereas prepositions ("on" in the ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

“opted not to” vs “opted to not” [closed]

Is there a difference between "opted not to" and "opted to not"? Which is correct to use in this example: "I opted to not|opted not to receive messages from this mailing list".
0
votes
2answers
117 views

I will learn better English — should it be “I will learn English better.”

Somehow, I think "better English" is incorrect, because I think there isn't better English; English is English. But I hear this phrase from other ESL students a lot. Is this correct way of saying it? ...
0
votes
4answers
70 views

Order of words and punctuation in a sentence [closed]

I am writing a sentence whose word order and punctuation has put me in a fix. Can I get some opinions on whether the construction is correct, grammatically? Ask him what becomes of the dogs he ...
2
votes
2answers
89 views

“I'm no more hungry” or “I'm no longer hungry” or “I'm hungry no more.” [closed]

I'm no more hungry I don't think I've heard the first one very often, but wasn't sure about the last two. I'm no longer hungry and I'm hungry no more Which of these three sentences ...
10
votes
6answers
1k views

Does order matter when writing a sentence including aunt and uncle?

While I was translating the sentence "Mi tío y mi tía estaban caminando en esa calle cuando vieron tu coche," on DuoLingo, I got dinged for translating the sentence to "My aunt and uncle were walking ...
4
votes
6answers
7k views

“I kindly ask to” vs “I ask to kindly”

Let's take the following two sentences as examples: I kindly ask you to send the letter to your boss. I ask you to kindly send the letter to your boss. It would be kind of you to send the letter to ...
1
vote
2answers
86 views

Customer Technical Support or Technical Customer Support?

I am part of a customer support team. When answering a new email request from a customer I start my reply with an introduction: Hi, John Doe here from the [What-goes-here?] team at ...
5
votes
4answers
4k views

Why does “Why doesn't it work?” become “Why does it not work?”

When you uncontract doesn't in "Why doesn't it work?" the not moves to "Why does it not work?" This confuses me even more when I use a longer phrase instead of the pronoun it like below: Why ...
2
votes
2answers
62 views

Where should “a lot” be placed in a sentence?

Which of these is right? I like to play with my dog a lot. I like a lot to play with my dog. I like to play a lot with my dog. Any of the above. I mean, where does a lot go in there? I searched ...
3
votes
1answer
112 views

Word ordering for sequels of works whose titles start with 'The'

Hopefully a simple one, but my Google-fu is letting me down. Typically, when alpabetising titles, I would move the 'The' to the end of the title but, in the case of a sequel, should that be moved to ...
0
votes
2answers
117 views

Adverb order: 'has largely been' or 'has been largely' [duplicate]

Does the placement of an adverb affect its meaning or application? Does each paired sentence here mean the same as the other? 1.1 Mobile technology progress has largely been consumer-driven ...
0
votes
2answers
89 views

Is it possible to say so very and very so?

I know that it is correct to use: Thank you so very much. As much as I know an adverb can be theoretically used to modify another adverb, so my question is: Is it possible to say very so ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Does the order matter in being “okay with”

Are the following two sentences interchangeable? "Are you okay with that?" "Is that okay with you?"
1
vote
1answer
106 views

Word order in salutations

Can we use a reverse order in salutations? For example, Tom, hello/hi instead of Hello/hi, Tom
-1
votes
1answer
75 views

just/only usage

Isn't there a difference (or aren't there differences) with the following? I only drive to work on Fridays I drive only to work on Fridays I drive to work only on Fridays I drive to work on Fridays ...
1
vote
3answers
566 views

“If only I” or “If I only” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” Should I use only before or after the pronoun? If only I had a chance If I only had a chance Both sentences bring a lot ...
22
votes
4answers
8k views

Correct position of “only”

Which is grammatically correct? I can only do so much in this time. or I can do only so much in this time.
3
votes
1answer
540 views

Where do you place the word 'only' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” Use of “only” and word-order Should one say The bidders shall not be permitted to bid for one or two tenders ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Use of “only” and word-order

I'm writing an automobile website and some of my paragraphs contain the word "only". I understand the following. As far as I'm aware, this is right: Only the Volkswagen Polo, Golf, Passat, Passat ...
1
vote
7answers
3k views

Past participle after noun: “proposed cost” vs. “cost proposed”

I have the following two examples: Our proposed cost is expensive. Our cost proposed is expensive. Is there any difference between them? Or is the second sentence wrong?
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Verb to be before pronoun in declarative sentences [duplicate]

I saw this sentence in a newspaper cartoon: Not only are you dysfunctional — you appear to be completely spineless as well. Is the verb are in the right position?
0
votes
0answers
38 views

Order of “noun + describing noun”

Which one is correct or preferred? The command /reload is... < some description > The /reload command is... < some description >
0
votes
1answer
86 views

The word order and prepositions in an example

Background to the sentence: a system activates itself after temperature has been deviated for [X] seconds. Now I want to describe what X does and I just cannot figure it out. My best attempts are: ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Order of words in sentence

I am asked the following the question: Question: Why are your results important? Answer: For segmenting and classifying a stream of documents dynamically without a fixed training ...
3
votes
1answer
59 views

Fronted adjuncts

Is it correct to begin sentences with adjuncts? To which degree are the sentences below acceptable? Do you need a special context to license this word order, or can you start a text with these ...
-1
votes
1answer
48 views

«Said I» vs «I said»

Are «said I» and «I said» interchangeable? «Said I» is pretty uncommon, or so I thought. The sentence in question looks like so: «"It's not going to be your way," — said I.» Or it could be «"It's not ...
0
votes
2answers
78 views

A simple question about syntax [closed]

I guess this would be a pretty simple question to answer. Is this sentence correct: The player appears to have not connected. I am having my doubts about the appears to have not part. P.S.: Not ...
1
vote
3answers
114 views

'Which were a size too small.' or 'which size were too small.' Which one is correct?

The whole sentence is Mr Boxell had deliberately sold the man a pair of shoes which were a size too small, knowing he would return them next day! I'm so confused about which were a size too ...
0
votes
2answers
62 views

“the below-identified person”: Term for this style and any style guides regarding

Are there any technical terms to specifically describe the two styles (A and B) below? Also, are there any prescriptive style guides that say which is preferable? My own preference is for style B ...
3
votes
2answers
251 views

“The more…, the less…” sentence with the same verb

I'm kinda ok with basic "The more..., the less..." type of sentences, like The more you think about it, the less likely you are to take action, but what if I want to say next: The more ...