This tag is for questions about the correct order of words in a phrase, or a sentence.

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-1
votes
2answers
60 views

Word order: “Tell me what is your opinion on this matter” or “Tell me what your opinion on this matter is” [duplicate]

Tell me what is your opinion on this matter. Tell me what your opinion on this matter is. Which one is correct? I understand the word order in the sentence like I want to know where she is. But ...
185
votes
4answers
66k views

What is the rule for adjective order?

I remember being taught that the correct order of adjectives in English was something along the lines of "Opinion-Size-Age-Color-Material-Purpose." However, it's been a long time and I'm pretty sure ...
4
votes
3answers
425 views

Titles of British Lords [closed]

In an old episode of The West Wing, a British Ambassador is referred to as "Lord John Marbury". Ignoring that once he became Ambassador he'd be Mr Ambassador, what are the possible correct addresses? ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Order of “noun + describing noun”

Which one is correct or preferred? The command /reload is... < some description > The /reload command is... < some description >
11
votes
2answers
766 views

Why is it “grand theft auto”?

I'm not a native speaker so it might just be me finding this strange, but why is the auto in grand theft auto at the end? Shouldn't it be grand auto theft or something like this? I thought the ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

Can the non-restrictive clause NOT be next to the noun it modifies?

The idea was borrowed from finance companies' high-efficiency routine of aligning business processes to achieve optimal growth, which abused the local laws to limit competition. The idea was ...
0
votes
1answer
158 views

looking for appositive that-which phrases

I asked sentences having an appositive that-which phrase like the following sentence in English Language Learners. The insect propagates best near "disturbed land," that which is being cultivated ...
6
votes
3answers
4k views

“Now I am” vs. “I am now”

Which is more correct? Now I am the main stakeholder... or I am now the main stakeholder... Do the intonations imply different meanings?
1
vote
3answers
228 views

“When we X, we can then” vs. “we then can”

Consider these two sentences: When we go home, we can then watch a DVD When we go home, then we can watch a DVD Both mean the exact same thing, but do they differ in linguistic terms?
-1
votes
2answers
38 views

Word usage of “not to fly” vs “to not fly ” [duplicate]

I often read the phrase "not to" preceding an action, as in "not to run" or "not to swim". It seems awkward. Please explain explain the usage.
3
votes
0answers
45 views

The same big old black bear. Why not 'the same black big old bear'? [duplicate]

I was reading this book- Every Boys Dream- and I am curious to understand, if there's something more than what meets the eye in the above usage. The same big old black bear.. The same ...
4
votes
2answers
429 views

When alphabetizing, which goes first?

When ordering these two names of places, which is first? Why? Newark, New York
3
votes
1answer
122 views

Word ordering for sequels of works whose titles start with 'The'

Hopefully a simple one, but my Google-fu is letting me down. Typically, when alpabetising titles, I would move the 'The' to the end of the title but, in the case of a sequel, should that be moved to ...
1
vote
3answers
227 views

Preferred list ordering [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What are the principles that make certain lists sound euphonious? Name for a type of idiom with two things joined (like “raining cats and dogs”, “bread and ...
13
votes
7answers
7k views

“All is not lost” vs “Not all is lost”

I guess I've been in mathematics for far too long, and I tend to use the phrase "Not all is lost" as the negative of "All is lost". To me the phrase "All is not lost" suggests that nothing is lost. ...
0
votes
3answers
128 views
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Where to put “too” when using fronting?

Where to put words like either or too when we are using fronting in a sentence? Take for example the sentence: She is a nice rhinoceros, too. Will too remain at the end if we put the object ...
1
vote
2answers
528 views

Statements beginning with subject+wonder

I'm wondering about the sentence structure when you use wonder. Take for instance: I wonder when will my money be refunded. I wonder when my money will be refunded. I wonder when is my ...
1
vote
2answers
37 views

What are the effects of word order in cause and effect sentences?

What are the differences between cause-and-effect sentences in which the causal agent precedes or follows its result? Both forms can be syntactically correct, but this question is concerned with their ...
0
votes
4answers
4k views

Is “forth and back” more proper than “back and forth”?

I think the term "back and forth" gets thrown around a lot without much thought. From Dictionary.com: forth    [fawrth, fohrth] adverb 1. onward or outward in place or space; forward: to ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Turned the television on or turned on the television? [duplicate]

I think turned the television on sounds better. I usually hear 'turned the television on' but I see 'turned on the television' in other references. Which is correct?
22
votes
7answers
5k views

Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?

Question: Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word "Than"? If no, what other English words share this property? Background: Trevor claimed that it is ...
1
vote
2answers
36 views

Statement where the words are in question order

I am watching a video series to prepare for CCNA certification tests. The instructor has this horrible habit of making a statement with words that sound like he's asking a question, e.g. … it’s ...
0
votes
2answers
106 views

Could “The flesh of the god” be an ambiguous title? Why?

Is the phrase "Flesh of the god" grammatically and semantically acceptable, or should it be "Flesh of the gods"? I am writing an article and I'd like to use it for the title. I am from Finland, so I ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

order or adjuncts and adjectives

The more thought I give about the order of adjuncts and adjectives before a noun, the less sense it all makes. Not a native speaker, but using English on a daily basis. For instance, in "Relational ...
-3
votes
1answer
33 views

“with use of” vs “using” [closed]

I am not sure how I should write following sentence and the more I think about it the more confused I am: "Development of ('a' - should be here an article?) BI application with use of (/using) OLAP ...
11
votes
2answers
437 views

“A place nearby” but not “A place good”

I can ask any of: Do you know a breakfast place nearby? Do you know a nearby breakfast place? Do you know a good breakfast place? but I really can't ask: Do you know a breakfast place ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Use of “respectively” in “both these localities are on the banks, respectively, at 12 km and 20 km upstream”

Both these source localities are on the banks of the Rhine, respectively, at 12 km and 20 km upstream from Bonn. In the above sentence, is respectively needed, and if so, is it properly used?
2
votes
2answers
139 views

Where should “a lot” be placed in a sentence?

Which of these is right? I like to play with my dog a lot. I like a lot to play with my dog. I like to play a lot with my dog. Any of the above. I mean, where does a lot go in there? I searched ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

However in the middle of a sentence

I wonder if I can use however like in this sentence: The lecture however does cover a lot of information, still doesn't explain the main subject. Sounds a bit awkward to me, but it still seems ...
1
vote
2answers
84 views

In what order should you say people's names?

I know that when you include someone, you say their name first. For example: "John and I went to the beach" How do you order the names when there are more than one additional people? For example: ...
-1
votes
1answer
51 views

I care not (for these things) vs. I don't care

Is the expression "I care not" grammatically correct? Do I care not and I don't care have the same meaning?
2
votes
3answers
54 views

Is it wrong to use 'not" in sentences that have an “all…not” form

All of the women in the district did not vote for the lone female candidate. What, if any, is the semantic problem in the above sentence. I was suggested the below sentence by my senior peers. ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

Placement of adjective “only”

I have the following sentence and three versions to write it: Ensure string only contains printable ASCII characters. Ensure string contains only printable ASCII characters. Ensure string ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

Delayed relative clause

Consider the following phrase taken from a draft of my master's thesis: In this chapter, the fundamental physiological principles will be presented that underlie the mathematical models and ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Position of always/continuously in these sentences

I have two sentences: 1.- On and beneath the earth's surface, new rock is made and old rock is destroyed ______________. 2.- The rock cycle occurs ______________________, over millions of years. ...
4
votes
3answers
732 views

“to not get” vs “not to get”

I came across this sentence in an article, "As she speaks of her family, friends and life, it's difficult to not get that 'feel good' mood." I'm wondering if the following sentence could also mean ...
2
votes
2answers
61 views

Word order in question with very long subject

The normal word order for a wh- question in English is: wh- + auxiliary + subject + verb. Hence the sentence below should be correct: What might the consequences of the loss of diversity of plant ...
0
votes
1answer
101 views

“been often” vs “often been” [closed]

Which of these is the correct form: techniques have been often used for post-processing or techniques have often been used for post-processing
0
votes
2answers
67 views

“Is it for when?” vs. “When is it for?”

I always get confused which of the following is correct: Is it for when? When is it for? Or are there further ways to ask for when something is needed. The it in question is an ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

How to properly write sentence with double words

I commonly come across sentences where I have to write the same word twice such as, This is what I've been looking for for a long time. and in these cases I just try to rewrite the sentence to ...
2
votes
3answers
91 views

order of adjectives - deleted recent questions vs recent deleted questions

From what is introduced here, "recent" is a kind of age and "deleted" seems to be a kind of specific opinion, so this structure seems to be correct: "deleted recent questions". Actually I was ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

“Above thing” or “thing above” [duplicate]

I don't know which is correct, it seems both can be used? "The above gun shows..." or "the gun above shows.." Also the below gun or the gun below, which is correct?
5
votes
3answers
298 views

should be always or should always be? [duplicate]

I am not a native speaker, I do not know how to say this properly: "It should be always on", or "It should always be on"? Is there any difference?
14
votes
4answers
15k views

“Can easily be” vs. “can be easily” — what's the difference?

I'm wondering what the difference is between: It can easily be obtained. It can be easily obtained. Also, what's the preferred way to write it? If there is any... I googled for both ...
2
votes
2answers
182 views

Why is “till” used in this expression: “If we don't leave till after lunch…”?

If we don't leave till after lunch we'll be cutting it very fine. I understand it to mean: "If we don't leave after lunch, we'll be cutting it very fine." (In the event of our not leaving ...
1
vote
2answers
144 views

What is differences between “level” and “degree”?

When we can use degree? And also when we can use level? Are they similar or not? For example in this sentence The way to tell a true unit from a degree of something is to look at the zero ...
1
vote
2answers
44 views

where to place *further* , *considering further*

As the closing sentence of a cover letter for an application I would like to write the sentence I would appreciate your further considering my application and remain... but is this correct, or ...
2
votes
1answer
140 views

A correct way to place a verb in a “double” question

I'm not sure what the correct way for placing a verb in such cases is: "May I ask what Australia’s policy is regarding this scheme?" or should it be "May I ask what is Australia’s policy regarding ...
7
votes
4answers
6k views

Is it incorrect to say, 'Give me it'?

Is it incorrect to say, 'Give me it' ? I am told that it is and one should always say, 'Give it me'?