This tag is for questions about the correct order of words in a phrase, or a sentence.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

2
votes
2answers
75 views

Preposing construction: “This I know” [on hold]

"This I know today, but back then..." What does this word order show? What's the rule?
0
votes
2answers
141 views

Being Madrid my hometown / Being my hometown Madrid

Being Madrid my hometown, I'm used to living surrounded by tourists. Being my hometown Madrid, I'm used to living surrounded by tourists. Which of the sentences, if either, sounds more natural?
3
votes
3answers
144 views

Object pronoun: me and John, or John and me?

When using ourselves and another person as the subject of a sentence, we use their name first (like "John and I"); but when the same two people become the object of a sentence, which order should the ...
4
votes
2answers
218 views

The use of "were- should- had” at the beginning of sentences instead of “if”

Conditionals in English are usually formed by using if with normal word order; but for the three past (subjunctive) forms were, should, and had, it is also possible to express the conditional through ...
1
vote
2answers
716 views

Use of “as well” in the middle of the sentence

I was wondering if the use of "as well" in the middle of the sentence is correct in formal English. Here is the particular sentence I am writing: I got ample opportunities to communicate with a ...
5
votes
1answer
79 views

It really bugs me if

Suppose I have gone to the movies(cinema). There is a man behind me that cracks sun-flower seeds open, talks with the next person, and also talks on his cell phone. I want to say that these behaviors ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

How to interpret this sentence? Also, a “Which vs. That” question

I was perusing the Wikipedia article about the Transformers film series and there is a section that describes a fifth movie in the franchise. Specifically, the section begins with this sentence: ...
2
votes
2answers
62 views

Word order for subordinate questions

I know subordinate questions have no inversion. Should this sentence: "Do you know what are the good things to do around here?" be "Do you know what the good things are to do around ...
2
votes
2answers
48 views

Taiwanese Chicken vs Chicken in a Taiwanese Style

I have a friend translating a menu and she would like to know how best to translate dishes that are from a certain region vs dishes where the main ingredient comes from a particular place. Names like ...
4
votes
4answers
114 views

Meaning of “And the day came when … ”

I saw some sentences that start with this phrase: "And the day came when ... " For example, the following sentence form The Garden Party and Other Stories by Katherine Mansfield At last the day ...
0
votes
1answer
76 views

Order of noun + modifying noun

Which one is correct or preferred? The command /reload is... < some description > The /reload command is... < some description >
1
vote
0answers
46 views

“The problem is who can we get to replace her” vs. “The problem is who we can get to replace her”

"The problem is who can we get to replace her" vs. "The problem is who we can get to replace her" Which one is correct and why?
3
votes
2answers
62 views

“The Grimm brothers” or “The brothers Grimm”? “The sisters Brontë” or “The Brontë sisters”?

Why the "brothers Grimm" but the "Brontë sisters"? Is there any order to follow? I’ve heard and read both “The brothers Wright” and “The Wright brothers”; “the brothers Wesley” and “the Wesley ...
5
votes
5answers
6k views

Why does “Why doesn't it work?” become “Why does it not work?”

When you uncontract doesn't in "Why doesn't it work?" the not moves to "Why does it not work?" This confuses me even more when I use a longer phrase instead of the pronoun it like below: Why ...
8
votes
2answers
32k views

“unless stated otherwise” or “unless otherwise stated”?

Convention: R^n is always assumed to carry the Euclidean topology, unless stated otherwise. Convention: R^n is always assumed to carry the Euclidean topology, unless otherwise stated. Which ...
27
votes
7answers
26k views

Order of “not” with infinitive

This is one thing that keeps bugging me, and maybe there's a direct answer. Grammatically, which one is more correct of these two? Does it make a difference? I tried not to do that. I tried ...
-1
votes
2answers
73 views

“If you want, I can do this ”vs “I can do this, if you want” which one is correct? [closed]

I am not sure which one of the two forms is correct: "If you want, I can do this" vs "I can do this, if you want" Do the above sentences have different meaning? even slightly? Other example: "I am ...
2
votes
1answer
92 views

Not really sure vs. really not sure

Is there any difference between saying "I am not really sure where the noise is from" and "I am really not sure where the noise is from"? are they interchangeable?
1
vote
2answers
49 views

Alphabetizing an index

What is the proper way to alphabetize acronyms in an index. The particular words in question are: "U.S. Constitutional Law" and "urbanization." Which should be listed first?
1
vote
2answers
22 views

“Range of operation” vs “operation range”

"Range of operation" vs "operation range" "The range of operation for the compressor (...)" or "The operating range of the compressor"? Do they have the same interpretation? Can they substitute one ...
2
votes
3answers
281 views

Why is “till” used in this expression: “If we don't leave till after lunch…”?

If we don't leave till after lunch we'll be cutting it very fine. I understand it to mean: "If we don't leave after lunch, we'll be cutting it very fine." (In the event of our not leaving ...
-1
votes
1answer
45 views

“Solutions offered” or “offered solutions”? [closed]

Which of these two is more grammatically correct? Defining customer needs and advising on solutions offered. Defining customer needs and advising on offered solutions.
2
votes
1answer
59 views

When would you use “said he”?

From Lord of the Rings: ‘You be careful of yourself, Maggot!’ she called. ‘Don’t go arguing with any foreigners, and come straight back!’ ‘I will!’ said he, and drove out of the gate. Normally ...
4
votes
3answers
13k views

Adverbs position in English: “place–manner–time” or “manner–place–time”?

Wikipedia tells us that the order should be place–manner–time. However, this webpage tells that it should be manner–Place–Time. Which one is correct? I have one sentence in two different orders: ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Modifying noun after noun?

At first I wrote When executing a read(v) operation, the state machines exchange optimistic state. I know that is correct, but I wonder if the following would also be acceptable in a technical ...
-1
votes
1answer
26 views

It's an expected label or It's an label expected. what's the difference?

Can anyone help me analyze the difference between the following two sentences? It's an expected label. It's a label expected.
0
votes
1answer
208 views

“Without whom…” or “whom … without”? [closed]

Is it more grammatically correct to move the preposition without to the end of its clause, or use without whom? Does the "in no particular order" change matters? I wish to express my sincere ...
3
votes
2answers
88 views

Position of interrogative auxiliary verbs as replies to statements [closed]

Imagine someone states the following to you: I think you're mistaken. We've never traveled to Italy together. What's the difference between the following two responses, if any? Haven't we? ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

Use of the adverb first in conjunction with then

Are the use and the positions of the adverbs first and then correct in the following two sentences? We prove, first, two preliminary properties, and, then, the whole theorem. We first show ...
-1
votes
1answer
62 views

Why does “chain and whips” sound 'wrong' in a Rihanna song? [closed]

I was asked recently about word order in the Rihanna song "S&M". There is a line in the chorus that uses the word order of "chains and whips": Sticks and stones may break my bones, but chains ...
-3
votes
1answer
60 views

Am I able to finish a sentence with 'for'? [closed]

Am I able to finish a sentence with 'for'? eg. "...age that had long since disappeared but the return of which they desperately yearned for."
5
votes
2answers
518 views

Why “inspector general”, and not “general inspector”, like German “Generalinspektor”? [duplicate]

I would expect the term "inspector general" to be "general inspector" instead. In part, that may be because I know the German variant as "Generalinspekteur" of "Generalinspektor". But I'm pretty ...
0
votes
1answer
187 views

Experience/Experienced: “With” or “In”?

Very simple question this time around, folks! (Have) experience or (be) experienced both generally create a connotation of living through something and/or learning about it. The big question is which ...
1
vote
1answer
80 views

send something to someone|somewhere

Background: I am writing a computer application which can understand English sentence. For that purpose, I was preparing frames of each word. For example: send something to recipient|place ...
2
votes
2answers
63 views

Problems with the meaning of the word 'even'

I understand the meaning of this word in general, but there's just one question. Here are two examples: We painted even the floor. AND We even painted the floor. Are they correct and if ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

About using “only” with present perfect

I have seen this sentence in a status from one of my facebook friends. It doesn't sound right to me. We have only left the city for the day. I think that it should be something like: We have ...
9
votes
4answers
9k views

Differences between “just might” and “might just?”

Can someone help me understand more precisely the connotative differences between "just might" and "might just I came upon this dilemma while working on a short comic strip. In the first panel, a ...
15
votes
5answers
70k views

Should an adverb go before or after a verb?

For example: The word rarely turns up outside of those contexts. The word turns up rarely outside of those contexts. Which one is correct and why?
1
vote
3answers
53 views

Usage of the phrase “type of”

I'm creating a worksheet for my students, and one of the questions asks them to identify which expression from three given expressions is correct. I am not sure how to pose the question, but I think ...
3
votes
5answers
1k views

“Please explain” or “explain please”

Which one is correct in this context? Person A: I think Apple will displace Google. Person B: Please explain. Should he say/write "Explain please"?
0
votes
1answer
29 views

“Even to” or “To even”?

I am not sure which one is grammatically correct. It could be both or none. Could you select which sentence would be grammatically correct? The only difference between the sentences is even to vs. to ...
1
vote
3answers
612 views

How should this sentence be structured?

I want to know which one of these two sentence structures is correct grammatically: This book is, despite being dense, a good read. This book, despite being dense, is a good read.
0
votes
1answer
118 views

Are there exceptions to the “place yourself last” rule for listing people? [closed]

Forgive me if this has already been asked. I understand that some aspects of this lovely language have dependencies on where and when things are used so I'm not quite sure if this question can be ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

Position of subordinate clause in a sentence

Which sentences are correct and according to what grammar rule? Throughout this text, we will use an example of sustainability management at a large university. We will use throughout this ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

“Why can I not” vs. “Why can not I” [closed]

Consider the following two sentences: Why can I not open the door? and Why can not I open the door? Which is more common? What's the subtle difference between them?
-1
votes
1answer
72 views

Disclaimer that covers everything in condensed wording

Let’s say I wanted to set up a comedy show using a particularly vulgar comedian. The comedian in this show would primarily use comedy insulting or degrading to individuals or organisations. I would ...
5
votes
2answers
295 views

Is this correct: “Aloof the hallow things shall always be”?

I'm writing a poem, and I wondered if, to a native speaker, this would sound awkward (or grammatically incorrect): Aloof the hallow things shall always be. As a variant of The hallow things ...
2
votes
1answer
123 views

Is there anything awkward in saying “ Prince Charles is now a husband”?

In my English class today my prof gave us a sentence: Prince Charles is now a husband. He then told us to find out if there is anything wrong with this sentence as our homework. Undoubtedly, ...
19
votes
6answers
39k views

Which is correct: “the below information” or “the information below”?

I frequently see statements that refer to something later in the text that use a phrase such as "the below information". Is it more correct instead to say "the information below" (or "the following ...
2
votes
3answers
109 views

Is it wrong to use 'not" in sentences that have an “all…not” form

All of the women in the district did not vote for the lone female candidate. What, if any, is the semantic problem in the above sentence? I was suggested the following sentence by my senior ...