This tag is for questions about the correct order of words in a phrase, or a sentence.

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6
votes
4answers
2k views

When to put “River” before or after its name and why?

Unlike mountain names, where "Mount" always precedes its name, e.g. Mount Everest, I've noticed that some rivers have "River" before its name, e.g. the River Nile but others have it after, e.g. the ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Which is the proper way of writing this :“Linda and yourself” or “you and Linda”

Would the proper way of writing "you and Linda" be "Linda and yourself"? (same concept as "Me and Linda" which should be written "Linda and I")
0
votes
2answers
32 views

Where to put “either”

I'm writing a short story for my own when I came across this dilemma: "And the question was immediate to a point of self-acknowledgement of either one’s inability to formulate abstraction into ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Word order: phrasal verb plus adverb

I'm dubious about word order in a situation of adverb plus phrasal verb. My specific question is the following. I want to refer to an article that deals with a certain topic. That topic is not the ...
1
vote
8answers
589 views

“Almost until 1900” or “until almost 1900”: which one is correct?

Although various eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American poets had professed an interest in Native American poetry and had pretended to imitate Native American forms in their own works, it was ...
0
votes
2answers
47 views

“Therefore I” or “I therefore” [duplicate]

I would like to understand the nuances. What is the correct way to use: "Therefore, I …" or "I, therefore …"
3
votes
1answer
56 views

When is it correct to postpone an attributive clause?

Normally, the attributive clause precedes the predicative phrase: The bag that he bought cost forty dollars. Those verbal valency complementations that are referentially identical with some ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Order of “noun + describing noun”

Which one is correct or preferred? The command /reload is... < some description > The /reload command is... < some description >
0
votes
2answers
29 views

Can the non-restrictive clause NOT be next to the noun it modifies?

The idea was borrowed from finance companies' high-efficiency routine of aligning business processes to achieve optimal growth, which abused the local laws to limit competition. The idea was ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Delayed relative clause

Consider the following phrase taken from a draft of my master's thesis: In this chapter, the fundamental physiological principles will be presented that underlie the mathematical models and ...
0
votes
1answer
78 views

Use of “as well” in a sentence

I was wondering if the use of "as well" in the middle of the sentence is right in formal English. The particaular sentence I am writing is: "I got ample opportunities to communicate with a large ...
3
votes
1answer
86 views

Use of “did” in an affirmative sentence before subject [duplicate]

I wrote the following sentence in an article: Only in June it created repositories. The editor corrected me: Only in June did it create repositories. What's the explanation for "did" in ...
2
votes
5answers
559 views

What is the correct way to phrase this?

I asked this question on meta.stackoverflow.com, but I need some help. What would be the correct way to phrase "...diverse topics from software programming to cooking to photography and gaming." Or if ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

Where to put “too” when using fronting?

Where to put words like either or too when we are using fronting in a sentence? Take for example the sentence: She is a nice rhinoceros, too. Will too remain at the end if we put the object ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

singular plural and word order [duplicate]

Good morning! "The main cause appears to be the gases we are releasing." I have two questions: - Shouldn't it be "appear to be" since we are talking about the gases (plural). - Is the word order ...
0
votes
2answers
66 views

Unusual usage of the phrase “leave me alone” [closed]

Is the following phrase incorrect or awkward somehow: I've been trying to make the ghost of you leave me alone.
1
vote
3answers
580 views

Subject-verb inversion / verb-subject-object — is this correct?

I recently read the following in a schoolbook: Wrote the researchers, "[...]" I wonder if this is correct English. I have seen it a couple of more times. Is this just a matter of preference? ...
2
votes
2answers
54 views

Statement where the words are in question order

I am watching a video series to prepare for CCNA certification tests. The instructor has this horrible habit of making a statement with words that sound like he's asking a question, e.g. … it’s ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

order or adjuncts and adjectives

The more thought I give about the order of adjuncts and adjectives before a noun, the less sense it all makes. Not a native speaker, but using English on a daily basis. For instance, in "Relational ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

The order of noun-modification patterns in IT

For example: The field Media/Media field contains all necessary information about the content. The Address section/section Address is located in the lower section of the window. Does the right ...
5
votes
3answers
5k views

Why do some adjectives follow the nouns they modify?

Right now I can only think of one instance in which this regularly occurs. The adjective proper is sometimes placed after the noun it modifies, e.g: Reptilia: A class of cold-blooded oviparous or ...
-1
votes
2answers
183 views

Word order: “Tell me what is your opinion on this matter” or “Tell me what your opinion on this matter is” [duplicate]

Tell me what is your opinion on this matter. Tell me what your opinion on this matter is. Which one is correct? I understand the word order in the sentence like I want to know where she is. But ...
189
votes
4answers
68k views

What is the rule for adjective order?

I remember being taught that the correct order of adjectives in English was something along the lines of "Opinion-Size-Age-Color-Material-Purpose." However, it's been a long time and I'm pretty sure ...
4
votes
3answers
437 views

Titles of British Lords [closed]

In an old episode of The West Wing, a British Ambassador is referred to as "Lord John Marbury". Ignoring that once he became Ambassador he'd be Mr Ambassador, what are the possible correct addresses? ...
11
votes
2answers
816 views

Why is it “grand theft auto”?

I'm not a native speaker so it might just be me finding this strange, but why is the auto in grand theft auto at the end? Shouldn't it be grand auto theft or something like this? I thought the ...
0
votes
1answer
180 views

looking for appositive that-which phrases

I asked sentences having an appositive that-which phrase like the following sentence in English Language Learners. The insect propagates best near "disturbed land," that which is being cultivated ...
6
votes
3answers
4k views

“Now I am” vs. “I am now”

Which is more correct? Now I am the main stakeholder... or I am now the main stakeholder... Do the intonations imply different meanings?
1
vote
3answers
231 views

“When we X, we can then” vs. “we then can”

Consider these two sentences: When we go home, we can then watch a DVD When we go home, then we can watch a DVD Both mean the exact same thing, but do they differ in linguistic terms?
-1
votes
2answers
45 views

Word usage of “not to fly” vs “to not fly ” [duplicate]

I often read the phrase "not to" preceding an action, as in "not to run" or "not to swim". It seems awkward. Please explain explain the usage.
3
votes
0answers
45 views

The same big old black bear. Why not 'the same black big old bear'? [duplicate]

I was reading this book- Every Boys Dream- and I am curious to understand, if there's something more than what meets the eye in the above usage. The same big old black bear.. The same ...
4
votes
2answers
434 views

When alphabetizing, which goes first?

When ordering these two names of places, which is first? Why? Newark, New York
3
votes
1answer
128 views

Word ordering for sequels of works whose titles start with 'The'

Hopefully a simple one, but my Google-fu is letting me down. Typically, when alpabetising titles, I would move the 'The' to the end of the title but, in the case of a sequel, should that be moved to ...
1
vote
3answers
229 views

Preferred list ordering [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What are the principles that make certain lists sound euphonious? Name for a type of idiom with two things joined (like “raining cats and dogs”, “bread and ...
13
votes
7answers
7k views

“All is not lost” vs “Not all is lost”

I guess I've been in mathematics for far too long, and I tend to use the phrase "Not all is lost" as the negative of "All is lost". To me the phrase "All is not lost" suggests that nothing is lost. ...
0
votes
3answers
134 views
1
vote
2answers
568 views

Statements beginning with subject+wonder

I'm wondering about the sentence structure when you use wonder. Take for instance: I wonder when will my money be refunded. I wonder when my money will be refunded. I wonder when is my ...
1
vote
2answers
48 views

What are the effects of word order in cause and effect sentences?

What are the differences between cause-and-effect sentences in which the causal agent precedes or follows its result? Both forms can be syntactically correct, but this question is concerned with their ...
0
votes
4answers
5k views

Is “forth and back” more proper than “back and forth”?

I think the term "back and forth" gets thrown around a lot without much thought. From Dictionary.com: forth    [fawrth, fohrth] adverb 1. onward or outward in place or space; forward: to ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Turned the television on or turned on the television? [duplicate]

I think turned the television on sounds better. I usually hear 'turned the television on' but I see 'turned on the television' in other references. Which is correct?
22
votes
7answers
5k views

Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?

Question: Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word "Than"? If no, what other English words share this property? Background: Trevor claimed that it is ...
0
votes
2answers
111 views

Could “The flesh of the god” be an ambiguous title? Why?

Is the phrase "Flesh of the god" grammatically and semantically acceptable, or should it be "Flesh of the gods"? I am writing an article and I'd like to use it for the title. I am from Finland, so I ...
-3
votes
1answer
39 views

“with use of” vs “using” [closed]

I am not sure how I should write following sentence and the more I think about it the more confused I am: "Development of ('a' - should be here an article?) BI application with use of (/using) OLAP ...
11
votes
2answers
450 views

“A place nearby” but not “A place good”

I can ask any of: Do you know a breakfast place nearby? Do you know a nearby breakfast place? Do you know a good breakfast place? but I really can't ask: Do you know a breakfast place ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

Use of “respectively” in “both these localities are on the banks, respectively, at 12 km and 20 km upstream”

Both these source localities are on the banks of the Rhine, respectively, at 12 km and 20 km upstream from Bonn. In the above sentence, is respectively needed, and if so, is it properly used?
2
votes
2answers
216 views

Where should “a lot” be placed in a sentence?

Which of these is right? I like to play with my dog a lot. I like a lot to play with my dog. I like to play a lot with my dog. Any of the above. I mean, where does a lot go in there? I searched ...
0
votes
1answer
97 views

However in the middle of a sentence

I wonder if I can use however like in this sentence: The lecture however does cover a lot of information, still doesn't explain the main subject. Sounds a bit awkward to me, but it still seems ...
1
vote
2answers
99 views

In what order should you say people's names?

I know that when you include someone, you say their name first. For example: "John and I went to the beach" How do you order the names when there are more than one additional people? For example: ...
-1
votes
1answer
72 views

I care not (for these things) vs. I don't care

Is the expression "I care not" grammatically correct? Do I care not and I don't care have the same meaning?
2
votes
3answers
61 views

Is it wrong to use 'not" in sentences that have an “all…not” form

All of the women in the district did not vote for the lone female candidate. What, if any, is the semantic problem in the above sentence. I was suggested the below sentence by my senior peers. ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

Placement of adjective “only”

I have the following sentence and three versions to write it: Ensure string only contains printable ASCII characters. Ensure string contains only printable ASCII characters. Ensure string ...