This tag is for questions about the correct order of words in a phrase, or a sentence.

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0
votes
2answers
90 views

Could the order of words in the common question be changed? [closed]

Examples (somebody is thinking about some thoughts, said by the devil): Maybe he is right... Or isn't he? Maybe he is right... Or he isn't? Maybe he is right... Or even to doubt in his falsehood ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

“Seems to be not X” vs. “seems to not be X”

Which one of these two sentences is written correctly? This test data seems to be not good. This test data seems to not be good. Better yet if you could explain as to why the correct ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Does appending a question mark to a declarative sentence result in a valid sentence?

Suppose I have the sentence: "All apples are green." Although it is not a true statement, clearly it is a declarative sentence. Can any declarative sentence like this be made into an ...
0
votes
1answer
484 views

“have basically been doing something” or “have been basically doing something” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Position of the adverb “of course” Should an adverb go before or after a verb? I was wondering what position of an adverb relative to more than one ...
4
votes
5answers
852 views

Long subjects in indirect questions

I know that to indirectly ask: What is your name? I should say something like: I don't know what your name is. But what if the subject of question is longer than "your name"? Something ...
5
votes
2answers
167 views

Difference between “to do as much for you as” and “to do for you as much as”

In Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary 3rd ed., one of the usage examples given for the entry much is: One day I hope I'll be able to do as much for you as you've done for me. Is the ...
3
votes
3answers
854 views

About using “only” with present perfect

I have seen this sentence in a status from one of my facebook friends. It doesn't sound right to me. We have only left the city for the day. I think that it should be something like: We have ...
1
vote
3answers
5k views

Put your shoes on and Take your coat off [closed]

I have often heard the following statements when someone talks about shoes, cloths, etc. I don't know which one is more appropriate or grammatically correct. Hey, put your shoes on. Hey, put ...
1
vote
2answers
203 views

Linguistic differences between these two sentences

Consider these two sentences: When we go home, we can then watch a DVD or When we go home, then we can watch a DVD Both mean the exact same thing but do they differ in linguistic terms?
2
votes
3answers
254 views

Question regarding sentence structure in a NY Times article about Michelle Obama

In a NY Times article titled "Michelle Obama and the Evolution of a First Lady", there is this sentence: Rahm Emanuel, then chief of staff, repeated the first lady’s criticisms to colleagues with ...
3
votes
1answer
428 views

The position of “strong enough” in “there is no headache strong enough” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: There is no headache strong enough, that a good coffee won't relieve There is no headache strong enough, that a good coffee won't relieve. I know that this ...
1
vote
6answers
256 views

“Plan not to retire” or “Plan to not retire”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Order of “not” with infinitive Someone edited my post on another StackExchange.com site to change the former to the latter. Which is better? I wrote the ...
2
votes
2answers
8k views

“But (something) instead” versus “but instead (something)”

Please consider the sentences: They do not overpower the city, but empower it instead. They do not overpower the city, but instead empower it. I'm doubting the use of but + instead. Is ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Proper usage/origin of the generic phrase “[action phrase] does not a [noun] make” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is “xxxx doth not a yyyy make” considered valid English? I occasionally come across a sentence formulated in a manner similar to the following: ...
1
vote
0answers
532 views

What's a very long prosodic stress example? [closed]

I found this example in Wikipedia, but it's only 6 words long: I didn't take the test yesterday. (Somebody else did.) I didn't take the test yesterday. (I did not take it.) I didn't take the test ...
-2
votes
1answer
498 views

Which is the correct wording when describing a question? [closed]

Which of the following is correct: People ask me, what google.com is? or People ask me, what is google.com?
13
votes
9answers
1k views

“Assign a variable to a value” or the other way round?

I was wondering which of these phrases is/are correct: assign a variable to a value assign a value to a variable I'd say the second is correct, but I'm not a native speaker. A quick Google search ...
5
votes
3answers
414 views

Passive clauses without auxiliaries

Sentences such as I came across a letter that was typed by her secretary, can be "reduced" by removing that and the auxiliary verb, yielding I came across a letter typed by her secretary. In this ...
2
votes
5answers
790 views

“Rather quite” or “quite rather”?

I'm a bit confused about this. They both sound correct to me. Quite rather weird Rather quite weird Which of the two is correct?
0
votes
2answers
978 views

When to use inverted word-order like “great an option”? [closed]

I heard this in a movie yesterday: That is great an option! Why didn't he say: That is a great option! How does grammar desribe such inverted phrases? Where should I use this inverted ...
4
votes
3answers
381 views

Is there a difference between “Joe said” and “said Joe”?

Does the subject/verb order make a difference when writing a dialog tag? "The sky is blue," Joe said. "The sky is blue," said Joe. Is one preferable over the other? Does one emphasize the ...
4
votes
4answers
946 views

“The world is not dangerous because of those who do harm but because of those who look at it without doing anything”

Yes, this is the original quote from Albert Einstein. I tend to put it this way: The world is dangerous not because of those who do harm but because of those who look at it without doing ...
2
votes
2answers
246 views

Is this correct grammar — “which feature in C/C++ don't you like?”

The question in question is this: Which feature in C/C++ don't you like? Just wanted to know if that is proper way of asking. Not sure if "don't you like" is the right way there.
9
votes
3answers
4k views

Differences between “just might” and “might just?”

Can someone help me understand more precisely the connotative differences between "just might" and "might just I came upon this dilemma while working on a short comic strip. In the first panel, a ...
10
votes
1answer
520 views

Why is it “grand theft auto”?

I'm not a native speaker so it might just be me finding this strange, but why is the auto in grand theft auto at the end? Shouldn't it be grand auto theft or something like this? I thought the ...
-3
votes
4answers
417 views

“Free bacteria!” on mineral water bottles [closed]

When I was traveling in Vietnam 15 years ago, I had great fun discovering on mineral water bottles the proud advertisement Free bacteria!. Is it common in English that the position of the adjective ...
-1
votes
1answer
217 views

How to properly use “reference database”?

Does it make more sense to say a reference database of [somethings] or a [something] reference database For example, by replacing [something] with "library" we get: a reference ...
7
votes
3answers
344 views

Word order, e.g. in “Hotel California”, “Brothers Quay”

This is a question about the order of words when a common name is associated to a proper name. Does it matter to say "California Hotel" rather than "Hotel California"? Similarly, there are two ...
5
votes
1answer
330 views

Do you find somebody something?

You do 'find something for somebody', but is 'find somebody something' equally correct English?
5
votes
1answer
101 views

How to use “social disparity”

How should the phrase social disparity be used in a sentence? There was great social disparity between A and B. The social disparity was great between A and B.
3
votes
3answers
117 views

Difference between “advantages of a car lease” and “car lease advantages”

It is hard for foreigners to understand the meaning of different English sentence constructions. Do the phrases below mean the same? advantages of a car lease car lease advantages When do ...
5
votes
3answers
844 views

Word order in imperative sentence

What are the correct possibilities for word order in the following sentence? Is there any general rule for imperative sentences? (Like SVOMPT?) Please, check regularly the updated information about ...
0
votes
2answers
236 views

Words order in a question

Which is better (and why)? Which feature should I attach this task to? or To which feature should I attach this task?
0
votes
3answers
289 views

Order of words and using of “of” [closed]

Which phrase is better: "software developer life" or "life of software developer"? First one sounds better but I would like to get why in a rather formalised way.
12
votes
5answers
4k views

Can “already” be used after a simple past verb in American English?

A British colleague asked if these two sentences are grammatically acceptable in American English: They found already high recognition in Europe and we wish to carry that further. ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

“always be” vs “is/are always”

Are the following sentences grammatically correct? I think #2 is correct, but I'm not sure. My room always be clean My room is always clean
2
votes
1answer
334 views

What's it called when you make an adjective post-positive? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why do some adjectives follow the nouns they modify? In English, adjectives usually precede the nouns they describe, as in "organic carrots". However, in some cases ...
4
votes
3answers
290 views

“Today is Joe's birthday” or “Joe's birthday is today”

Perhaps some of you have already observed that Facebook reminds one of friends' birthdays using [xyz]'s birthday is today. To my ears, Today is [xyz]'s birthday sounds better. I guess both ...
1
vote
1answer
647 views

How do you format a sentence to avoid or use “to to” correctly? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Rules about prepositions and duplicating 'to' Where did you travel to to get that? Using to, to has always looked/seemed awkward to me. What is the proper ...
7
votes
4answers
299 views

“The ^ character indicates… ” or “The character ^ indicates… ”

Which one is correct? The ^ character indicates the beginning of the string. or The character ^ indicates the beginning of the string. Or both? I ask because in my native language ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Why do some adjectives follow the nouns they modify?

Right now I can only think of one instance in which this regularly occurs. The adjective proper is sometimes placed after the noun it modifies, e.g: Reptilia: A class of cold-blooded oviparous or ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Starting a sentence with “In Winter 2010,”

Would that be permissible? It just sounds awkward. Use Cases: In winter 2010, two penguins, named Jony and Rony, were born. In winter 2010, five ice-skaters , each in the 130 lb category, ...
8
votes
4answers
591 views

“Back up data” or “back data up”?

Which is correct? To back up data. To back data up. The context is the following: He was careful enough to perform tests and [back up data | back data up] to avoid any problems.
2
votes
1answer
768 views

Phrase and word-order meaning

I know that "only" and "just" and word-order are oft-mentioned topics on here, but word-order for phrases and meanings - don't both of these mean different things? Here is an example of how word ...
1
vote
1answer
392 views

Why do we write the name of Judges in a strange way?

I did a bit of law when I was in school, and recently, I recalled a unique feature of the law system regarding the way the names of judges were written, especially those with the title of Justice. ...
3
votes
1answer
434 views

Adverb placement in “Let's simply share”

To me the expression Let's simply share seems wrong. I've always thought the adverb should come after the verb. Is that correct?
0
votes
2answers
170 views

What does “From Twitter came” mean? [closed]

Is this sentence in italics correct grammatically? Is it written in inverted order? If we rewrite this sentence, is it Came from Twitter? From Twitter came, "@dannyhakim Pictures of flooded ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Usage of “just”, “only” and word-order [intended meaning]

I've got these sentences, which meanings are correct (my interpretations are in brackets): Use of only: (1) Only in 1996, Ford sold a rebadged Mazda 626 GV over here as its rebranded Japanese ...
0
votes
3answers
307 views

Why are some adjectives placed after a noun?

How would you explain these words: Corporate America, Revenue Canada, ServiceOntario, etc.? Edit: To clarify my question, why is corporate America more popular than American corporate or American ...
2
votes
2answers
300 views

Correct order of multiple possessive words

Which is correct: Myrtle’s party took place in her and Tom’s apartment Or Myrtle’s party took place in Tom's and her apartment Or neither?