This tag is for questions about the correct order of words in a phrase, or a sentence.

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2
votes
3answers
2k views

“…and me” or “me and…” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Me and my wife” or “my wife and me” I keep seeing that it's just courtesy to put yourself last in a list of nouns. eg. "They went to the game ...
15
votes
3answers
746 views

“You just can't” vs. “you can't just ”

I'm a bit confused about this. Which expression is correct? You can't just do that. or You just can't do that. I'm trying to say: You can't just bash an ideology because of what ...
2
votes
1answer
881 views

Word order in defining and non-defining relative clauses

With defining relative clauses, there is a different word order according to the status of the relative pronoun in the sentence (that is, it can be either the subject or the object of the relative ...
0
votes
4answers
3k views

Is “forth and back” more proper than “back and forth”?

I think the term "back and forth" gets thrown around a lot without much thought. From Dictionary.com: forth    [fawrth, fohrth] adverb 1. onward or outward in place or space; forward: to ...
5
votes
3answers
405 views

“An abandoned cute little kitten” or “a cute abandoned little kitten” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the rule for adjective order? I saw an abandoned cute little kitten. I saw a cute abandoned little kitten. Which sentence is correct? What is the ...
11
votes
2answers
381 views

“A place nearby” but not “A place good”

I can ask any of: Do you know a breakfast place nearby? Do you know a nearby breakfast place? Do you know a good breakfast place? but I really can't ask: Do you know a breakfast place ...
7
votes
2answers
400 views

“put X down to” vs. “put down X to”: subjects of verbs with two particles

I expect I would have to put down many coats to do the job. (SOURCE) One factor to distinguish phrasal verbs from prepositional verbs is particle movement. Phrasal verbs can place the particle ...
2
votes
2answers
333 views

Not always + inversion? [closed]

My neighbour's little son (they are from UK) asked me for something, saying that he wants it and hence he will get. I realized I do not know how to say that correctly (for the first one I used ...
4
votes
3answers
243 views

Which is correct: “first ever loss” or “first loss ever”

Consider the following two phrases Microsoft reports first quarterly loss ever Microsoft reports first ever quarterly loss Which of the them is correct?
2
votes
1answer
190 views

Definite article usage and word ordering in 'all the equipment necessary to create a network'

I have a sentence where I am not sure about the word order, and if the definite article should be used or not. Which version is correct: It is a system which includes all equipment necessary to ...
3
votes
1answer
519 views

Where do you place the word 'only' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” Use of “only” and word-order Should one say The bidders shall not be permitted to bid for one or two tenders ...
8
votes
2answers
377 views

Why “buy things secondhand,“ not “buy secondhand things”?

I saw the word ‘secondhand’ come after ‘things’ in the lead copy of July 17 Time magazine’s article, titled “10 Things You Should Be Buying Used”, as follows. Buying things secondhand can save a ...
6
votes
1answer
193 views

Placement of “just” in “we just need minified and concatenated files” [closed]

I was talking to my client. I wanted to convey that "we need the minified type of files and the concatenated type of files; nothing other than that". I quickly wrote this: we just need minified ...
6
votes
2answers
3k views

“Above”/“below” before/after a noun

I have seen sentences similar to the following: (1) See the reference above. (2) See the reference below. And, (3) See the above reference. But not, (4) See the below reference. ...
-1
votes
1answer
963 views

How to create a questions from past modal verb sentences

I have no idea why my question was closed as it was pretty clear (at least for a person of average intelligence) so I am trying again: There is a sentence, e.g: He could have seen that. Will the ...
1
vote
4answers
226 views

“Can take no other” vs. “can't take other”

As an ESL I'm not sure if I can use the following sentences: You can take no other directions. I'm using it on giving indications to a foreigner. Should I use instead: You can't take other ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

Position of prepositions in questions and clauses

I would like to know if there is any rule to know where prepositions should be placed in questions or clauses. For example, I have heard many sentences and some of them put the preposition in the ...
2
votes
6answers
824 views

“Sure I am not” — is that valid English?

Consider this conversation: — Iceland has more than 200 rainy days per year. — Are you sure? — No, I am not sure. Is it valid or wrong English to say, — No, sure I am not. ...in the ...
2
votes
3answers
230 views

Loathe. The atypical use of the verb [closed]

I have a quick question about the atypical grammar of mine. I am a poet using iambic pentameter. The question is whether the following is grammatically correct: I she loathes. That I loathe. ...
5
votes
2answers
185 views

“Imperial Japanese Navy” or “Japanese Imperial Navy”?

Is it "Imperial Japanese Navy" or "Japanese Imperial Navy", and why?
5
votes
2answers
462 views

Inverted adjective in “in matters political”

In in matters political, one can notice the inversion of the standard adjective-noun order. Here's an example in context: political obligation is only one consideration among many in a ...
6
votes
3answers
1k views

When to put “River” before or after its name and why?

Unlike mountain names, where "Mount" always precedes its name, e.g. Mount Everest, I've noticed that some rivers have "River" before its name, e.g. the River Nile but others have it after, e.g. the ...
17
votes
2answers
930 views

What is wrong with “Where should this car be parked?”?

Why does Microsoft Word 2010 show an error for the following sentence? 1. Where should this car be parked? Word 2010 also suggests changing the sentence to 2. Where this car should ...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

Position of 'also'

What is the correct position of the word 'also'? I would like to also talk about ... I would also like to talk about ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

If “latter” comes first, and “former” comes second, what comes third? Or fourth? [closed]

If we had an hour long discussion, and discussed 5 topics: A, B, C, D and E in order, to the extent that we are talking about "E" right now, if "D" is the latter, and "C" is the former, what is "B" to ...
1
vote
0answers
19 views

Word order in subject sentences (questions) [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Usage of “What” + verb without auxiliary one I have probably not used the correct term but I am sure you will get it. If a question has do-support, then in ...
5
votes
4answers
520 views

Referring to previous words

I'm facing a difficulty about referring to previously mentioned words. It's something that bothers me a lot about the English language. Please consider Mathematicians can use these theorems to ...
0
votes
2answers
4k views

Why do we use the word “Do” when connecting a sentence? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Sentences using: [something] + have + they Use of “do” in affirmative statements I was reading a news paper article of Times Of India, and came across a sentence- ...
0
votes
1answer
395 views

provide for - sentence

I have found this in the dictionary but not sure whether I can separate these (from the examples on the internet, I think I cannot): I will provide for him. I will provide him for ?? cannot be? ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Tag Questions “is he not”

"He is happy, isn't he?" If you did not use the contraction isn't he, in the question above, would the correct sentence be: "He is happy, is he not?" "He is happy, is not he?" Sentence #1 seems ...
5
votes
2answers
313 views

In which case are items written in a different order than they are read aloud?

When talking about money, people often write "$1", but read this as "one dollar", rather than "dollar one". (Same with "£1" and "one pound"). Are there any other situations, besides currency, in which ...
1
vote
2answers
128 views

Do I need “have” here?

Was it specifically mentioned as part of their teaching or they have just happened not to have killed anyone? Do I need have there?
3
votes
1answer
5k views

Is there a difference in meaning between “does not seem to” and “seems not to”?

Consider the following sentences: Try not to be alarmed if a rule doesn’t seem to work for a specific sentence. Try not to be alarmed if a rule seems not to work for a specific sentence. ...
2
votes
2answers
174 views

Are “now … any time” and “any time now” different meanings?

We know what "any time now" means, indeed: from now on it will happen soon. But in the sentence, which is quite informal, "Now yo'berths's ready any time, Miss" - said by the porter in the train (Pale ...
3
votes
2answers
7k views

“For both X and Y” or “both for X and Y” or …?

Which of these forms is correct? X will be used both for Y and Z X will be used for both Y and Z X will be used both for Y and for Z Other...
0
votes
4answers
807 views

Which of these sentences use proper grammar?

Unfortunately, there currently is not a way to make it default to a lower resolution. Unfortunately, there is currently not a way to make it default to a lower resolution. Unfortunately, ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“Pick up something” or “pick something up”?

I have difficulties with word order: I have picked up the pencil from the floor. [says my dictionary] ?I have picked the pencil up from the floor. [could be?] ?I will pick up it. [sounds ...
0
votes
1answer
262 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Duplicate of: When is it appropriate to end a sentence in a preposition? Possessive connecting word for inanimate object I am not sure about following sentence being grammatically correct: ...
1
vote
7answers
3k views

Past participle after noun: “proposed cost” vs. “cost proposed”

I have the following two examples: Our proposed cost is expensive. Our cost proposed is expensive. Is there any difference between them? Or is the second sentence wrong?
2
votes
4answers
936 views

“Run over XXX” or “run XXX over”

I would need to clarify which one is correct. My dictionary says “run somebody over” (meaning hit by car) and an example: I ran over the dog. On the internet I found: I’m afraid we’ve just ...
2
votes
4answers
408 views

What is the correct way to phrase this?

I asked this question on meta.stackoverflow.com, but I need some help. What would be the correct way to phrase "...diverse topics from software programming to cooking to photography and gaming." Or if ...
6
votes
3answers
359 views

Moving the interrogative pro-adverb to the end of a question

I am not a native speaker of English. From what I learn, 'wh' questions in English should normally be like this: Why should we believe you? How did she participate in the massacre? However, ...
0
votes
1answer
125 views

Which expression isn't an old way of speaking: Fell to, Fell on, Fell onto, or Dropped to [closed]

My linguistic teacher told me I am speaking like the people who lived hundreds of years ago, when I told him, "The paper fall to the ground when I pass it by," this afternoon. Please tell me which ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

I will (have the package sent) vs (have sent the package) by next week

I'm aware that: I will have the package sent by next week is correct. But what about: I will have sent the package by next week Is it completely wrong to say it or is there some ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Position of “of which” in the sentence [closed]

In a post here I found that both following sentences are correct..is that true? Is the first one really grammatically correct? A camera of which the wires go through the wall. A camera, the ...
6
votes
2answers
3k views

“Now I am” vs. “I am now”

Which is more correct? Now I am the main stakeholder... or I am now the main stakeholder... Do the intonations imply different meanings?
5
votes
3answers
453 views

Position of adverb “implicitly”

In the following sentence I'm not sure where to put implicitly: The language doesn't support Int and (implicitly) converts (implicitly) Int to Double (implicitly). First I put it at the end, ...
3
votes
3answers
162 views

“At least make this” vs “make this at least” - which is grammatical?

Which one of the following sentence is grammatically correct? Can we at least make this predictable? Can we make this at least predictable? What is the grammar rule?
6
votes
1answer
591 views

Word order for “What is… that … called?”

I am having difficulty with finding the natural word order in the following passive construction: What are people called who do a lot of unnecessary work? What are called people who do a lot ...
4
votes
4answers
841 views

What exactly does “All Items Not On Sale” mean?

Here's a quote from Bill Bryson's "The Mother Tongue": Imagine being a foreigner and having to learn ... , that a sign in the store saying ALL ITEMS NOT ON SALE doesn't mean literally what it ...