This tag is for questions about the correct order of words in a phrase, or a sentence.

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0
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1answer
364 views

provide for - sentence

I have found this in the dictionary but not sure whether I can separate these (from the examples on the internet, I think I cannot): I will provide for him. I will provide him for ?? cannot be? ...
4
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2answers
2k views

Tag Questions “is he not”

"He is happy, isn't he?" If you did not use the contraction isn't he, in the question above, would the correct sentence be: "He is happy, is he not?" "He is happy, is not he?" Sentence #1 seems ...
5
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2answers
309 views

In which case are items written in a different order than they are read aloud?

When talking about money, people often write "$1", but read this as "one dollar", rather than "dollar one". (Same with "£1" and "one pound"). Are there any other situations, besides currency, in which ...
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2answers
126 views

Do I need “have” here?

Was it specifically mentioned as part of their teaching or they have just happened not to have killed anyone? Do I need have there?
3
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1answer
4k views

Is there a difference in meaning between “does not seem to” and “seems not to”?

Consider the following sentences: Try not to be alarmed if a rule doesn’t seem to work for a specific sentence. Try not to be alarmed if a rule seems not to work for a specific sentence. ...
2
votes
2answers
164 views

Are “now … any time” and “any time now” different meanings?

We know what "any time now" means, indeed: from now on it will happen soon. But in the sentence, which is quite informal, "Now yo'berths's ready any time, Miss" - said by the porter in the train (Pale ...
3
votes
2answers
7k views

“For both X and Y” or “both for X and Y” or …?

Which of these forms is correct? X will be used both for Y and Z X will be used for both Y and Z X will be used both for Y and for Z Other...
0
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4answers
726 views

Which of these sentences use proper grammar?

Unfortunately, there currently is not a way to make it default to a lower resolution. Unfortunately, there is currently not a way to make it default to a lower resolution. Unfortunately, ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“Pick up something” or “pick something up”?

I have difficulties with word order: I have picked up the pencil from the floor. [says my dictionary] ?I have picked the pencil up from the floor. [could be?] ?I will pick up it. [sounds ...
0
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1answer
262 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Duplicate of: When is it appropriate to end a sentence in a preposition? Possessive connecting word for inanimate object I am not sure about following sentence being grammatically correct: ...
1
vote
5answers
3k views

Past participle after noun: “proposed cost” vs. “cost proposed”

I have the following two examples: Our proposed cost is expensive. Our cost proposed is expensive. Is there any difference between them? Or is the second sentence wrong?
2
votes
4answers
863 views

“Run over XXX” or “run XXX over”

I would need to clarify which one is correct. My dictionary says “run somebody over” (meaning hit by car) and an example: I ran over the dog. On the internet I found: I’m afraid we’ve just ...
2
votes
4answers
368 views

What is the correct way to phrase this?

I asked this question on meta.stackoverflow.com, but I need some help. What would be the correct way to phrase "...diverse topics from software programming to cooking to photography and gaming." Or if ...
6
votes
3answers
351 views

Moving the interrogative pro-adverb to the end of a question

I am not a native speaker of English. From what I learn, 'wh' questions in English should normally be like this: Why should we believe you? How did she participate in the massacre? However, ...
0
votes
1answer
123 views

Which expression isn't an old way of speaking: Fell to, Fell on, Fell onto, or Dropped to [closed]

My linguistic teacher told me I am speaking like the people who lived hundreds of years ago, when I told him, "The paper fall to the ground when I pass it by," this afternoon. Please tell me which ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

I will (have the package sent) vs (have sent the package) by next week

I'm aware that: I will have the package sent by next week is correct. But what about: I will have sent the package by next week Is it completely wrong to say it or is there some ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Position of “of which” in the sentence [closed]

In a post here I found that both following sentences are correct..is that true? Is the first one really grammatically correct? A camera of which the wires go through the wall. A camera, the ...
6
votes
2answers
3k views

“Now I am” vs. “I am now”

Which is more correct? Now I am the main stakeholder... or I am now the main stakeholder... Do the intonations imply different meanings?
5
votes
3answers
433 views

Position of adverb “implicitly”

In the following sentence I'm not sure where to put implicitly: The language doesn't support Int and (implicitly) converts (implicitly) Int to Double (implicitly). First I put it at the end, ...
3
votes
3answers
162 views

“At least make this” vs “make this at least” - which is grammatical?

Which one of the following sentence is grammatically correct? Can we at least make this predictable? Can we make this at least predictable? What is the grammar rule?
6
votes
1answer
561 views

Word order for “What is… that … called?”

I am having difficulty with finding the natural word order in the following passive construction: What are people called who do a lot of unnecessary work? What are called people who do a lot ...
4
votes
4answers
769 views

What exactly does “All Items Not On Sale” mean?

Here's a quote from Bill Bryson's "The Mother Tongue": Imagine being a foreigner and having to learn ... , that a sign in the store saying ALL ITEMS NOT ON SALE doesn't mean literally what it ...
3
votes
2answers
592 views

“Does not make changes” or “makes no changes”

I was thinking of using this sentence on my computer program: This action does not make changes on user's machine. Just to be sure, I checked Google Translate which suggested: This action ...
1
vote
3answers
195 views

Preferred list ordering [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What are the principles that make certain lists sound euphonious? Name for a type of idiom with two things joined (like “raining cats and dogs”, “bread and ...
1
vote
2answers
5k views

The time before place mantra [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the rule for adjective order? As a Dutch schoolboy, during English grammar lessons (long ago...) I got one rule hammered into my head like a mantra: time before ...
-1
votes
2answers
422 views

Word order in questions

I would need to know whether the following is correct: What should be your best friend like? //what character should your best friend have What is his strange car for? //question I do not know ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

“Already” at the beginning of a sentence

Is it considered good form to use the word already at the beginning of a sentence? For instance: Already in 1930, certain people were watching television in their homes. I have seen it used in ...
1
vote
1answer
369 views

“Learning always” vs “always learning”

What is the difference between learning always and always learning in terms of grammar and connotation? If the connotation is the same then which is preferred?
2
votes
1answer
953 views

Where to put the preposition of “approve”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it appropriate to end a sentence in a preposition? In this answer I wrote [You can use it] to take pictures of a movie in a cinema, of which the cinema ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

Order of phrases after verb: Prefer “share with you X” or “share X with you”?

Which of these sentences is grammatically correct? I wanted to share with you the outcomes of today's board meeting I wanted to share the outcomes of today's board meeting with you
2
votes
2answers
453 views

What does “The man that once did sell the lion’s skin While the beast liv’d was killed with hunting him” mean?

I came across the following sentence in the context of four professional men discussing a plot to retrieve their lost $1 million, swindled from them by a nouveau riche American banker in Jeffery ...
1
vote
5answers
146 views

Precedence: and > or?

The question Precedence of “and” and “or” asks if there is any notion of precedence ordering in the English and it would seem not, based on the answers. Regardless of that, if you saw the following ...
2
votes
3answers
297 views

Which is better, “provided object” or “object that is provided”?

Here is my original sentence that I was told needs correction. For instance, the provided metadata and types are sufficient for the automatic construction of the application user interface. ...
0
votes
2answers
92 views

Could the order of words in the common question be changed? [closed]

Examples (somebody is thinking about some thoughts, said by the devil): Maybe he is right... Or isn't he? Maybe he is right... Or he isn't? Maybe he is right... Or even to doubt in his falsehood ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

“Seems to be not X” vs. “seems to not be X”

Which one of these two sentences is written correctly? This test data seems to be not good. This test data seems to not be good. Better yet if you could explain as to why the correct ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Does appending a question mark to a declarative sentence result in a valid sentence?

Suppose I have the sentence: "All apples are green." Although it is not a true statement, clearly it is a declarative sentence. Can any declarative sentence like this be made into an ...
0
votes
1answer
536 views

“have basically been doing something” or “have been basically doing something” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Position of the adverb “of course” Should an adverb go before or after a verb? I was wondering what position of an adverb relative to more than one ...
4
votes
5answers
896 views

Long subjects in indirect questions

I know that to indirectly ask: What is your name? I should say something like: I don't know what your name is. But what if the subject of question is longer than "your name"? Something ...
5
votes
2answers
170 views

Difference between “to do as much for you as” and “to do for you as much as”

In Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary 3rd ed., one of the usage examples given for the entry much is: One day I hope I'll be able to do as much for you as you've done for me. Is the ...
3
votes
3answers
969 views

About using “only” with present perfect

I have seen this sentence in a status from one of my facebook friends. It doesn't sound right to me. We have only left the city for the day. I think that it should be something like: We have ...
1
vote
3answers
6k views

Put your shoes on and Take your coat off [closed]

I have often heard the following statements when someone talks about shoes, cloths, etc. I don't know which one is more appropriate or grammatically correct. Hey, put your shoes on. Hey, put ...
1
vote
2answers
211 views

Linguistic differences between these two sentences

Consider these two sentences: When we go home, we can then watch a DVD or When we go home, then we can watch a DVD Both mean the exact same thing but do they differ in linguistic terms?
2
votes
3answers
257 views

Question regarding sentence structure in a NY Times article about Michelle Obama

In a NY Times article titled "Michelle Obama and the Evolution of a First Lady", there is this sentence: Rahm Emanuel, then chief of staff, repeated the first lady’s criticisms to colleagues with ...
3
votes
1answer
452 views

The position of “strong enough” in “there is no headache strong enough” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: There is no headache strong enough, that a good coffee won't relieve There is no headache strong enough, that a good coffee won't relieve. I know that this ...
1
vote
6answers
261 views

“Plan not to retire” or “Plan to not retire”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Order of “not” with infinitive Someone edited my post on another StackExchange.com site to change the former to the latter. Which is better? I wrote the ...
2
votes
2answers
8k views

“But (something) instead” versus “but instead (something)”

Please consider the sentences: They do not overpower the city, but empower it instead. They do not overpower the city, but instead empower it. I'm doubting the use of but + instead. Is ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Proper usage/origin of the generic phrase “[action phrase] does not a [noun] make” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is “xxxx doth not a yyyy make” considered valid English? I occasionally come across a sentence formulated in a manner similar to the following: ...
1
vote
0answers
619 views

What's a very long prosodic stress example? [closed]

I found this example in Wikipedia, but it's only 6 words long: I didn't take the test yesterday. (Somebody else did.) I didn't take the test yesterday. (I did not take it.) I didn't take the test ...
-2
votes
1answer
527 views

Which is the correct wording when describing a question? [closed]

Which of the following is correct: People ask me, what google.com is? or People ask me, what is google.com?
13
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9answers
1k views

“Assign a variable to a value” or the other way round?

I was wondering which of these phrases is/are correct: assign a variable to a value assign a value to a variable I'd say the second is correct, but I'm not a native speaker. A quick Google search ...