This tag is for questions about the correct order of words in a phrase, or a sentence.

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0
votes
2answers
84 views

Where to put “for free”

Which of the following sentences is more correct? Listen to Deep House and other electronic music on XXX for free. Listen to Deep House and other electronic music for free on XXX.
1
vote
1answer
175 views

Does the order of the word 'please' matter? [closed]

Is there a difference between: Can I go home, please? and Can I, please, go home? I feel like the first is more formal, when the second shows some kind of irritation. Am I right?
-1
votes
1answer
313 views

“The judge is god” or “The god is judge”?

In a scene in The great debaters, Denzel Washington's character asks his students to reiterate some lines. He asks: Who is the judge? And the students reply: The judge is god. Now, why is ...
2
votes
2answers
169 views

“Known not to …” or “Known to not …”

Which one of the following word orders is correct: This program is known not to work correctly. or This program is known to not work correctly.
0
votes
1answer
314 views

“a high enough” vs. “high enough a”

After editing a question recently, the OP undid those edits stating he did not like the bad changes I made with regards to the grammar of the post. The author originally wrote: Nobody in this ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

position of “only”

Which sentence is correct? (A) Mosquito larvae can only be seen through a microscope. (B) Mosquito larvae can be only seen through a microscope. (C) Mosquito larvae can be seen only through ...
0
votes
1answer
553 views

Is inverted word order such as “Anybody else does have any other concerns?” correct?

I know that if I was supposed to spin a grammatically correct sentence with the same meaning, I would probably say: Does anybody else have any other concerns? However, is the sentence in the ...
0
votes
2answers
214 views

How to merge two sentences? [closed]

I need your help in merging these two sentences in one and short. For the evaluation, three statistical criteria were used: correlation coefficient (R), root mean squared difference (RMSD), and ...
0
votes
3answers
93 views

30 v. the 30. Which would be more correct? [duplicate]

Would it be proper to say "I take the 30 to work" (meaning the I-30 freeway) rather than saying "I take 30 to work"?
0
votes
1answer
247 views

How to fix sentences where it is unclear whom a verb is referring to?

From addicted2succces.com the following sentence reads awkwardly in my :opinion He quickly noticed that all of the other friends he had hated hard work and had no desire to improve themselves. ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Inversion with “many times” at the beginning of a sentence

I am having a discussion with my friend. I said, "Many times I have seen him washing his car." He says it should be, "Many times have I seen him washing his car. Much like "Often do I see him", and ...
8
votes
4answers
3k views

“Mom and Dad” vs “Dad and Mom”

I'm curious if the order implies anything here. I'm pretty sure "Mom and Dad" is standard in English. The issue was hard for me to google, so I'm asking it here: Is using "Dad" before "Mom" ...
0
votes
2answers
445 views

Positioning of adverb phrases [duplicate]

Here are three ways to say the same thing. I wonder if there are particular rules regarding to the position of adverb phrases: Then play those passages over and over again in your memory Or, ...
4
votes
1answer
374 views

Always vs Every day

I have lunch at school every day vs I always have lunch at school. Why does the frequency adverb, always, go before the verb, have, whereas the expression, "every day" is placed at the end of ...
2
votes
2answers
118 views

Position of “to” in the sentence

Is there any difference between the below two statements: I have to pay bills I have bills to pay Could you please tell us the difference between the above two statements and when to use them.
1
vote
1answer
127 views

Imperative + which, should [duplicate]

I'm about to post an ad for our company survey but I'm not sure which of the following (the position of should) is correct. Take the survey on which computer should our company get next. or ...
2
votes
3answers
289 views

Why is “till” used in this expression: “If we don't leave till after lunch…”?

If we don't leave till after lunch we'll be cutting it very fine. I understand it to mean: "If we don't leave after lunch, we'll be cutting it very fine." (In the event of our not leaving ...
37
votes
7answers
9k views

Why use “of” in the phrase “delivered of a baby”?

With all the "Royal baby" craze comes something that really confuses me. All the news media used pretty much the same sentence to make the announcement: The Duchess of Cambridge has been ...
6
votes
3answers
430 views

Difference between “not every” and “every … is not”

I've always understood that you can order the words not and every (or similar words) in the following two ways to convey distinct logical meanings. Every human is not a man. There is no human being ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

“Having not” vs “not having”

I did a bit of searching on the difference between "not having" and "having not", but I could not find a convincing argument. I typed this sentence; Congratulations on not having given up yet! ...
2
votes
3answers
342 views

“My latest five novels” or “my five latest novels”?

Is it okay to say "my latest five novels" when I want to express "five of my latest novels"? As far as I know, "five" is a postdeterminer, so it precedes an adjective (except for ...
1
vote
1answer
785 views

“the XXX something” vs “the something XXX”

I'm curious about the correct way of using the XXX something XXX construction. I used to have the 80 port, the 'English Language & Usage' forum in my writing. But at the same time I see that many ...
1
vote
1answer
304 views

Position of adverbial phrase [duplicate]

Is there a difference in these two sentences, and if so, what is the difference? Immediately afterwards I remembered having met her. I remembered having met her immediately afterwards. I think ...
-3
votes
1answer
389 views

In this sentence, does the word “as” make it sound like the speaker was the leader? [closed]

Oh, to illustrate the frustration as the leader, for the fifth year changed the rules; I could barely nod my head!
2
votes
2answers
886 views

Is saying “Let me show you it” totally wrong?

My kids (8-10yrs) love to saying things like this. It just rolls naturally out and I correct them often. Is there is a specific reason the grammar is wrong? Maybe for the brain it is more direct than ...
1
vote
2answers
781 views

Statements beginning with subject+wonder

I'm wondering about the sentence structure when you use wonder. Take for instance: I wonder when will my money be refunded. I wonder when my money will be refunded. I wonder when is my ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Noun-adjective-noun: Can a noun phrase have an adjective in the middle?

Can a noun phrase have an adjective in the middle as in the following examples? car new tires salad high-calorie dressing house external wall nitrogen fine droplets These examples ...
6
votes
2answers
624 views

Indirect “be” question; word order

Caveat: There are a great number of similar questions I have found, but none has explained this specific thing. If the answer does exist and I have overlooked it, please let me know. So, I was under ...
1
vote
4answers
278 views

“It can be safely deleted” vs. “It can safely be deleted”

Is there a subtle difference between the following two sentences? It can be safely deleted. It can safely be deleted. If they mean the same thing, is one preferred for other reasons?
1
vote
3answers
2k views

One-letter word at the end of line of text [closed]

In English language, is a one-letter word (such as I or a) allowed to be at the end of line? (This question is about a single-letter word within a sentence, placed just before a linebreak.) For ...
2
votes
2answers
473 views

Does 'which' refer to the noun immediately preceding it?

Is the 'which' in Proposition 25 suggests a better definition of m-reducibility than given in Definition 23, which is also the one typically given in texts ambiguous? It is a line from an ...
-1
votes
2answers
650 views

“I bicycle” - “I ride bikes” - “I bike” [closed]

What's the best way to say it? "I like to ride bicycles" is correct but pretty lame sounding... Is "I bicycle" correct? Or is it too obscure to be good usage?
1
vote
1answer
918 views

If you place an ly adverb after the verb is the meaning different than if it were infront of the verb? [duplicate]

For example: I did not respond physically I did not physically respond I can't escape the sense that #2 'strongly' leaves open the possibility (or implies) that the writer responded some way ...
-1
votes
2answers
1k views

Usage of have: “Could you please explain why have these invoices been cancelled” is correct? [closed]

Is it correct sentence: "Could you please explain why have these invoices been cancelled?" Or "Could you please explain why these invoices have been cancelled?" I heard that that have should always ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

“The paper on Monday published X” vs. “the paper published on Monday X”

What would be the best position of Monday in the following sentence — before or after the verb? The paper on Monday published what the artist called a blunt attack on people’s right to privacy. ...
0
votes
1answer
332 views

“Would of course be” vs. “of course would be” [duplicate]

I am not sure about the position of 'of course' inside a sentence. Please consider these two versions and comment on that: A comprehensive documentation would of course be highly valuable... ...
4
votes
6answers
13k views

“I kindly ask to” vs “I ask to kindly”

Let's take the following two sentences as examples: I kindly ask you to send the letter to your boss. I ask you to kindly send the letter to your boss. It would be kind of you to send the letter to ...
-1
votes
2answers
175 views

“I only have discovered today” vs. “I only today have discovered” vs. “I have only today discovered”

Since I am not a native English speaker it's hard to find anything related to this topic on google. Which of the following word orders is grammatical? I only have discovered today we have a ...
2
votes
3answers
308 views

Adjective + “of them”

My wife and I were discussing whether it is allowable to put an adjective in front of "of them". For instance, I could say "I want 5 cats" and "I want 5 of them". However, while it sounds perfectly ...
1
vote
2answers
613 views

Does a name go before or after the noun it modifies?

The sentence The user “John Smith” has been registered; go to the “User Profile” tab to view the user’s details. reads more naturally to me than The “John Smith” user has been registered; go ...
2
votes
0answers
26 views

“A question in a question” [duplicate]

I've got two questions for you. Number one: I've always been confused about what I call "a question in a question" (maybe there is a technical term for that but I don't know it). What I mean is... ...
1
vote
1answer
119 views

A Revelation (?) from MS Word [duplicate]

So, I typed the parenthetic statement 'Asked why did he come here'. Microsoft Word suggested that I change the sentence to 'Asked why he came here'. I agreed with the correction, but when I had word ...
1
vote
1answer
44k views

Is it correct to start a sentence with “with” in English?

Is it correct to use with at the beginning of a sentence? Here's an example sentence: With the development of the economy, living standards improved. To my eyes this looks unnatural; I would ...
-4
votes
1answer
174 views

“Enter the password 1234” vs. “enter 1234 for a password” [closed]

Which sentence is correct? Enter the password 1234. Enter 1234 for a password.
0
votes
1answer
525 views

Which is right: “what pants is he wearing” or “what pants are he wearing”? [duplicate]

Since 'pants' is one of those always plural words, I can't figure out which sounds right.
-2
votes
2answers
72 views

Is it 'express shipped' or 'shipped express'? [closed]

Which one is correct? He should have express shipped it to me. He should have it shipped express to me.
3
votes
5answers
551 views

Why should “be” come after “neither a borrower nor lender,” not before them?

I came across the maxim, “Neither a borrower nor a lender be” in the following sentence of Jeffery Archer’s fiction, “The Fourth Estate” (P.54), and found that the maxim came from Lord Polonius’ ...
-2
votes
1answer
1k views

“more people becoming increasingly xxx” or “more people increasingly becoming xxx”

I need a bit of guidance regarding the following sentence. Which of the three variants is grammatical? Are more people becoming increasingly intolerant? Are more people increasingly becoming ...
-1
votes
3answers
688 views

When I write any sentence in English every native reader can tell I am Europen, how? [closed]

Can you conclude that just by my writing the question?
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Does it matter where you put “only”? [duplicate]

Could you please tell me which one of these sentences is correct, or are they both grammatically correct? This will only happen if you go with me. This will happen only if you go with me.