This tag is for questions about the correct order of words in a phrase, or a sentence.

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1
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1answer
533 views

“Learning always” vs “always learning”

What is the difference between learning always and always learning in terms of grammar and connotation? If the connotation is the same then which is preferred?
1
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2answers
481 views

Mixing adjective and noun enumerations

I am having trouble writing a seemingly simple sentence. I am organising an event where three kinds of food will be served: hot beverages cold beverages finger food My trouble deals with putting ...
1
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2answers
97 views

“Not only … but also” —parallelism in a particular case

I have been looking around to find an answer to my question, but I was unable to find one that addressed my specific problem. I want to create the following sentence, but I'm not sure whether it's ...
1
vote
1answer
229 views

Word constellation when using 'neither… nor'

I would like to express that I am not something, as well that I never was it or ever will be. This is what I wrote: Neither I am, nor was I ever, nor will I ever be [...] This appears to be ...
0
votes
0answers
59 views

Reversal of normal word order without change in meaning

"Out the window flew the parakeet." This is a complete reversal of the normal order of the sentence elements, but it doesn't change the meaning (though it does change the emphasis a bit). Are there ...
0
votes
2answers
183 views

“the below-identified person”: Term for this style and any style guides regarding

Are there any technical terms to specifically describe the two styles (A and B) below? Also, are there any prescriptive style guides that say which is preferable? My own preference is for style B ...
0
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2answers
274 views

Words order in a question

Which is better (and why)? Which feature should I attach this task to? or To which feature should I attach this task?
0
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2answers
1k views

When to use inverted word-order like “great an option”? [closed]

I heard this in a movie yesterday: That is great an option! Why didn't he say: That is a great option! How does grammar desribe such inverted phrases? Where should I use this inverted ...
0
votes
1answer
389 views

“the board of directors I have just became a member of” or “of which I have just became a member” [duplicate]

Duplicate of: When is it appropriate to end a sentence in a preposition? Possessive connecting word for inanimate object I am not sure about following sentence being grammatically correct: ...
0
votes
1answer
263 views

Word order of participial modifiers and proper nouns

This is a follow-up to this earlier question. I want to say that I met a person and they were drunk at the time. Which should I use: I saw intoxicated John. I saw the intoxicated John. I saw John ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Adverb order: 'has largely been' or 'has been largely' [duplicate]

Does the placement of an adverb affect its meaning or application? Does each paired sentence here mean the same as the other? 1.1 Mobile technology progress has largely been consumer-driven ...
0
votes
3answers
479 views

Why are some adjectives placed after a noun?

How would you explain these words: Corporate America, Revenue Canada, ServiceOntario, etc.? Edit: To clarify my question, why is corporate America more popular than American corporate or American ...
0
votes
2answers
242 views

“It doesn't always X” vs “It always doesn't X”

When I read these two sentences out loud, I feel that they express very different things. 1. Job interviews don't always go well. 2. Job interviews always don't go well. At least to me, 1) ...
0
votes
1answer
9k views

Proper use of “you” with a second person's name

Which is correct? It was nice to meet you and Bob. or It was nice to meet Bob and you.
0
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2answers
614 views

Usage of “but” in a sentence. [duplicate]

I'm reading Robinson Crusoe and came across many of these constructions with "but" in it. I can't help but thought they were a little unusual. I don't consider myself fluent in English, that's why I ...
-1
votes
1answer
191 views

just/only usage [duplicate]

Isn't there a difference (or aren't there differences) with the following? I only drive to work on Fridays I drive only to work on Fridays I drive to work only on Fridays I drive to work on Fridays ...
-1
votes
5answers
2k views

“Not once he would” vs. “not once would he”

Not being a native speaker and suffering semantic satiation from overthinking this, I'd like to ask this probably overly simple question. Not once would he... uses reversal for negation and ...
-2
votes
2answers
567 views

Direct object “it” in final position… grammatical?

In a video a native speaker of English said: I gotta show you something... it is important. I need to show you it. I am not a native speaker and this last sentence sounds extremely weird to me. ...