0
votes
2answers
66 views

Is it “Bride Weds Groom” or “Groom Weds Bride”? [on hold]

I am designing a wedding invitation for my friend. I want to know which of the following is the correct form to print on the invitation: Bride's Name Weds Groom's Name or is it Groom's Name ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

My and Linda's or Mine and Linda's? [duplicate]

How do you use possessive pronouns in cases where there are multiple "owners" and "objects" in question? For example would it be: "I've included my and Linda's suggestions in the file" or "I've ...
7
votes
1answer
164 views

What colour eyes

I've just stumbled on this sentence What colour eyes does she have? in my grammar book. What got me interested in this is the combination of the words colour, eyes with what and without any ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

What is the differences between these three words? [closed]

tell apart say apart speak apart please tell me about differences between these words. And also what do they mean? Are they expressions?
0
votes
2answers
91 views

How to merge two sentences? [closed]

I need your help in merging these two sentences in one and short. For the evaluation, three statistical criteria were used: correlation coefficient (R), root mean squared difference (RMSD), and ...
0
votes
3answers
87 views

30 v. the 30. Which would be more correct? [duplicate]

Would it be proper to say "I take the 30 to work" (meaning the I-30 freeway) rather than saying "I take 30 to work"?
-1
votes
2answers
275 views

“I bicycle” - “I ride bikes” - “I bike” [closed]

What's the best way to say it? "I like to ride bicycles" is correct but pretty lame sounding... Is "I bicycle" correct? Or is it too obscure to be good usage?
0
votes
3answers
241 views

Infinitive vs. Past Simple for short technical annotations [duplicate]

I use source control management software at work. When I commit some changes, I annotate them with the bare infinitive like this: "add new feature", "fix bug #10012" I note that some of my ...
1
vote
3answers
196 views

The phrase 'give you me'

There was another sentence that I wasn't sure about: "Rather, O blessed one, give you me boldness to abide within the harmless laws of peace, avoiding strife and hatred and the violent fiends of ...
1
vote
2answers
188 views

Mixing adjective and noun enumerations

I am having trouble writing a seemingly simple sentence. I am organising an event where three kinds of food will be served: hot beverages cold beverages finger food My trouble deals with putting ...
4
votes
2answers
145 views

“Pay-for” vs. “for-pay”

Is pay-for or for-pay the correct word? For example, which of these two sentences is correct? This is a pay-for product. This is a for-pay product.
0
votes
2answers
372 views

Word order with “just” and “only” meaning “merely”

Marking a German student's test I have encountered the following problem: The relationship between the two adolescents is one-sided. Just the boy really feels something, the girl hates him. Can ...
0
votes
4answers
1k views

“Introduce person to object” or “introduce object to person”?

I'd like to introduce you to this technology. I'd like to introduce this tech to you. Which one is right and what are appropriate uses?
2
votes
2answers
71 views

A suggestion for a change by reviewers

One of the suggestions that I got in my paper review is just indicated as a mistake in There is, however, no proven criterion when to stop. What is wrong with the above sentence. Word ordering? ...
6
votes
1answer
178 views

Placement of “just” in “we just need minified and concatenated files” [closed]

I was talking to my client. I wanted to convey that "we need the minified type of files and the concatenated type of files; nothing other than that". I quickly wrote this: we just need minified ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

Is there a difference in meaning between “does not seem to” and “seems not to”?

Consider the following sentences: Try not to be alarmed if a rule doesn’t seem to work for a specific sentence. Try not to be alarmed if a rule seems not to work for a specific sentence. ...
3
votes
2answers
549 views

“Does not make changes” or “makes no changes”

I was thinking of using this sentence on my computer program: This action does not make changes on user's machine. Just to be sure, I checked Google Translate which suggested: This action ...
2
votes
3answers
254 views

Question regarding sentence structure in a NY Times article about Michelle Obama

In a NY Times article titled "Michelle Obama and the Evolution of a First Lady", there is this sentence: Rahm Emanuel, then chief of staff, repeated the first lady’s criticisms to colleagues with ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Usage of “just”, “only” and word-order [intended meaning]

I've got these sentences, which meanings are correct (my interpretations are in brackets): Use of only: (1) Only in 1996, Ford sold a rebadged Mazda 626 GV over here as its rebranded Japanese ...
2
votes
2answers
154 views

How to express a chronological dependency?

How do I express a chronological dependency between two events? Is it alright to say : "Event A must be chronologically after Event B"? Any suggestions are welcome.
7
votes
3answers
2k views

“You're not the boss of me” vs “You're not my boss”

For some years now I've heard You're not the boss of me increasingly more often relative to the more "correct, natural" (to me, at least) You're not my boss. Thanks to the magic of NGrams, I've ...
2
votes
2answers
110 views

Choosing the better word order

In these two examples, what types of reasons (assuming the writing is generally about both characters) make a particular style a better choice? Or is this just an arbitrary choice that doesn't really ...
7
votes
3answers
10k views

Should it be 10 US$ or US$ 10?

Which is correct to use in a sentence, 10 US$ or US$ 10. Perhaps USD should be used instead or even something else?
4
votes
2answers
2k views

“Pretend to not” vs. “Pretend not to” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Order of “not” with infinitive The following are both accepted as grammatically correct, right? You pretend to not notice. You pretend not to ...
3
votes
5answers
305 views

“The place where we promised to meet”

This is talking about a promise to meet at a certain place. However, is it grammatically correct? Is it badly phrased? It seems that it can be misinterpreted to mean that at a certain place a promise ...
1
vote
10answers
226 views

“High Accident Intersection”

I was challenged recently to solve this problem. An accident takes place on an intersection on a high road. However, if I was to write about this as taken place in a "high accident intersection" it ...
1
vote
4answers
239 views

“What score are we playing until?” or how to ask it?

Every day Jack and Ted have about 5–15 minutes to go outside and play table tennis in the afternoon. As their free time varies each time (sometimes it's 5 minutes, sometimes 10, sometimes 15), they ...
3
votes
1answer
671 views

How to describe braces, brackets, parentheses?

I have this term: ((x ,y, z)) and I need to describe in words that the x in this term should be outside the bars? Is this correct? outside the bars? x ((y,z)) The position of the x ...
1
vote
1answer
342 views

Adjectives and nouns: which modifier should be written first?

If I am writing a sentence where both a noun and an adjective are used as modifiers, shall I write first the adjective, or the noun? It's a nice C code snippet. (?) It's a C nice code snippet. ...
3
votes
1answer
68 views

“Drupal Planet” versus “Planet Drupal”

Between Drupal Planet, and Planet Drupal, which one is correct? I would think Planet Drupal is correct, in the same way Planet Earth is correct. Which one would be the interpretation of Drupal Planet? ...
3
votes
3answers
148 views

Is it “Chinese simplified”, or “simplified Chinese”?

What is the correct way to call one of the scripts used for Chinese? Chinese simplified, or simplified Chinese?
4
votes
1answer
774 views

Conditional sentences not starting with “if”

Were I rich, I would live on Long Island. If I were rich, I would live on Long Island. Is the first sentence still used, or is used in particular contexts (in example, to give emphasis to the ...
9
votes
2answers
6k views

“Built-in” or “In-built”

Is there any difference between using in-built or built-in? Is one more correct than the other, or does it depend on the context, or ”house style”? This oven comes with a built-in extractor fan. ...