0
votes
2answers
2k views

Punctuation around the word “namely”

It seems somehow tricky to apply the right punctuation when it comes to the word namely. I got the following advice: Search globally for "namely", and add a comma after it, as well as a comma, a ...
4
votes
4answers
287 views

Adjective order: Why is “big” before “beautiful”?

I was reading an English children story to my niece the other day when I came across these phrases said by three different characters: I want a big, beautiful hat! I want a big, ...
-3
votes
1answer
259 views

In this sentence, does the word “as” make it sound like the speaker was the leader? [closed]

Oh, to illustrate the frustration as the leader, for the fifth year changed the rules; I could barely nod my head!
1
vote
1answer
174 views

Punctuation for lists

I have a sentence like this: As you can see, there are two projects "project1" and "project2", where the latter uses the global wrapper functions defined in "project1" project. My question is ...
17
votes
3answers
771 views

You don't want to answer this word-placement question, now do you?

Prompted by this question I got to thinking about the placement of the word now. If it's placed before the comma, it refers to an immediate condition: You don't want to answer this word-placement ...
15
votes
3answers
3k views

How does one correctly punctuate a sentence that declares that one has a question? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Punctuation with “The question is…” '.', '?' or ' “… ?” ' Position of question mark when sentence doesn't end ...
2
votes
3answers
258 views

Question regarding sentence structure in a NY Times article about Michelle Obama

In a NY Times article titled "Michelle Obama and the Evolution of a First Lady", there is this sentence: Rahm Emanuel, then chief of staff, repeated the first lady’s criticisms to colleagues with ...
0
votes
4answers
523 views

Correct punctuation of a phrase?

Knowledge is expensive. But even more so, is stupidity. or Knowledge is expensive. But, stupidity is even more so. I'm very confused as to the correct punctuation and order or the above ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Use of “only” and word-order

I'm writing an automobile website and some of my paragraphs contain the word "only". I understand the following. As far as I'm aware, this is right: Only the Volkswagen Polo, Golf, Passat, Passat ...