0
votes
3answers
271 views

“By when you want it completed” vs. “when you want it completed by”

Which of the following is grammatical? Can you please let me know by when you want it completed. Can you please let me know when you want it completed by. I am preferring the latter, but ...
7
votes
1answer
179 views

What colour eyes

I've just stumbled on this sentence What colour eyes does she have? in my grammar book. What got me interested in this is the combination of the words colour, eyes with what and without any ...
0
votes
3answers
412 views

Keeping the same word-order in a sentence without changing the meaning?

In the first Venn diagram below, the two circles represent Freedom and Love, in that order. In the second diagram, they are the same Freedom and Love, but the label “Love without Freedom” puts each ...
1
vote
0answers
23 views

“for which 'blah blah'” vs. “which 'blah blah' for” [duplicate]

When is it appropriate to use "for which" instead of "which .. for"? e.g. (talking about webpages) This method is useful for deprecated pages for which users have made bookmarks vs This ...
2
votes
3answers
184 views

“put your coat on” and “put on your coat” but not “depend on someone” and “depend someone on*”

Why can you say "put on your coat" and "put your coat on" but not "depend on someone" and "depend someone on*"? Why are adverbs ("on" in the first sentence) mobile, whereas prepositions ("on" in the ...
-2
votes
2answers
154 views

Position of “to” in a sentence

Which of the following is grammatically correct and why? I got less time to focus per course. I got less time per course to focus on. Edit: I want to convey the idea that because I took ...
1
vote
2answers
108 views

“I will rob you of it” vs. “I will rob it of you”

Which of these is grammatically correct, and why? I will rob you of it I will rob it of you
2
votes
2answers
79 views

Position of “to” in the sentence

Is there any difference between the below two statements: I have to pay bills I have bills to pay Could you please tell us the difference between the above two statements and when to use them.
35
votes
7answers
5k views

Why use “of” in the phrase “delivered of a baby”?

With all the "Royal baby" craze comes something that really confuses me. All the news media used pretty much the same sentence to make the announcement: The Duchess of Cambridge has been ...
2
votes
3answers
195 views

Adjective + “of them”

My wife and I were discussing whether it is allowable to put an adjective in front of "of them". For instance, I could say "I want 5 cats" and "I want 5 of them". However, while it sounds perfectly ...
1
vote
1answer
16k views

Is it correct to start a sentence with “with” in English?

Is it correct to use with at the beginning of a sentence? Here's an example sentence: With the development of the economy, living standards improved. To my eyes this looks unnatural; I would ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

Position of prepositions in questions and clauses

I would like to know if there is any rule to know where prepositions should be placed in questions or clauses. For example, I have heard many sentences and some of them put the preposition in the ...
3
votes
2answers
7k views

“For both X and Y” or “both for X and Y” or …?

Which of these forms is correct? X will be used both for Y and Z X will be used for both Y and Z X will be used both for Y and for Z Other...
0
votes
1answer
262 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Duplicate of: When is it appropriate to end a sentence in a preposition? Possessive connecting word for inanimate object I am not sure about following sentence being grammatically correct: ...
2
votes
1answer
976 views

Where to put the preposition of “approve”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it appropriate to end a sentence in a preposition? In this answer I wrote [You can use it] to take pictures of a movie in a cinema, of which the cinema ...
1
vote
3answers
6k views

Put your shoes on and Take your coat off [closed]

I have often heard the following statements when someone talks about shoes, cloths, etc. I don't know which one is more appropriate or grammatically correct. Hey, put your shoes on. Hey, put ...
1
vote
1answer
779 views

How do you format a sentence to avoid or use “to to” correctly? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Rules about prepositions and duplicating 'to' Where did you travel to to get that? Using to, to has always looked/seemed awkward to me. What is the proper ...
0
votes
1answer
636 views

“Data source types” vs. “types of data sources”

Is there any difference in meaning between "Many different data source types" and "Many different types of data sources"? I have no strong understanding on the use of "of".
1
vote
7answers
523 views

“Almost until 1900” or “until almost 1900”: which one is correct?

Although various eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American poets had professed an interest in Native American poetry and had pretended to imitate Native American forms in their own works, it was ...
1
vote
2answers
573 views

“Plugging in X” vs. “plugging X in”

Does one say Plugging in that value into the previous equation... or Plugging that value in the previous equation... or something else?
3
votes
5answers
6k views

“with whom” or “whom with”

I've been looking, but I have not come across this 'whom' related question anywhere. Specifically in this circumstance, I feel 'with whom' flows more naturally but I remember someone suggested that ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

“otherwise directed” vs. “directed otherwise”?

I've seen conflicting usage of the two phrases below, and I wonder which is grammatically correct and why: Do something unless directed otherwise. Do something unless otherwise directed.
4
votes
3answers
380 views

“In almost” vs “Almost in”

Which of the following is correct? In almost all cases, ... Almost in all cases, ...
10
votes
3answers
4k views

Prepositions at the end of sentence and whom

I believe it's okay to end a sentence with a preposition. That seems to be the consensus here as well. Now I think that when who is the object of a preposition, it should technically be whom, e.g. ...
79
votes
12answers
10k views

When is it appropriate to end a sentence in a preposition?

Like many others, I commonly find myself ending a sentence with a preposition. Yes, it makes me cringe. I usually rewrite the sentence, but sometimes (in emails) I just live with it. To, with... ...