2
votes
5answers
428 views

Why should “be” come after “neither a borrower nor lender,” not before them?

I came across the maxim, “Neither a borrower nor a lender be” in the following sentence of Jeffery Archer’s fiction, “The Fourth Estate” (P.54), and found that the maxim came from Lord Polonius’ ...
2
votes
0answers
142 views

Swapping the order in an idiomatic expression [closed]

I may have sounded general in the title but my question is very specific. Recently I was writing a poem and I needed it to rhyme this way Some will stand to watch you go down quick But no one ...
4
votes
1answer
524 views

Placement of “off the beaten track” in context

I know that "off the beaten track" means "unusual". Can it be used before a noun and after a verb? For example, an off the beaten track place This holiday is off the beaten track. Is it ...
0
votes
4answers
3k views

Is “forth and back” more proper than “back and forth”?

I think the term "back and forth" gets thrown around a lot without much thought. From Dictionary.com: forth    [fawrth, fohrth] adverb 1. onward or outward in place or space; forward: to ...
1
vote
3answers
6k views

Put your shoes on and Take your coat off [closed]

I have often heard the following statements when someone talks about shoes, cloths, etc. I don't know which one is more appropriate or grammatically correct. Hey, put your shoes on. Hey, put ...
8
votes
5answers
802 views

Having or eating one's cake

Which is it? "You cannot eat your cake and have it, too," meaning you can have it or you can eat it, but once it's gone there's no cake left to eat. "You cannot have your cake and eat it, too", ...