0
votes
2answers
64 views

Complex question starting with 'I wonder'

I want to ask about some plans, which I want to define in the question. And I want to start with I wonder. So something like: I wonder what the plans for the next steps regarding the topic we ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

“Blue colour” or “Colour blue”

Recently I started learning english on busuu.com. In on of the elementary exercices "Colours", that I performed, the following phrase was stated as the correct answer: "I like the colour blue" ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

looking for appositive that-which phrases

I asked sentences having an appositive that-which phrase like the following sentence in English Language Learners. The insect propagates best near "disturbed land," that which is being cultivated ...
3
votes
4answers
315 views

Can I put the question word “where” at the end of a question? [closed]

I got this sentence from a Primary 5 student's worksheet. According to this passage, this creature can be found where? Some of the parents think that the sentence should be "..., where can ...
0
votes
4answers
103 views

Position of “yet” in a causative sentence

If I have to write a causative sentence in Present Perfect, where should I put yet, at the end of the question or right after the negation? She hasn't had her doors mended by the carpenter yet. ...
-1
votes
2answers
54 views

“I am a degree holder now” or “I am now a degree holder” [duplicate]

Which one is correct? I am a degree holder now. I am now a degree holder.
0
votes
3answers
263 views

“By when you want it completed” vs. “when you want it completed by”

Which of the following is grammatical? Can you please let me know by when you want it completed. Can you please let me know when you want it completed by. I am preferring the latter, but ...
2
votes
1answer
62 views

Is “Rouse me not” grammatically permissible? [duplicate]

In A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin, he writes that the “words” [see footnote] of House Grandison are Rouse Me Not. Is this grammatically correct? Does English allow such word-scrambling ...
1
vote
4answers
178 views

Usage of the term “second cousin” in a formal setting

I am trying to write an engraving message for a Christening gift. I have been asked to be a Godfather of my cousin's son. I ideally want to put "from your Godfather and second cousin" in the message, ...
0
votes
2answers
48 views

“Huge potential profit” vs. “huge profit potential”

What is the proper usage — "huge potential profit" or "huge profit potential"?
3
votes
2answers
544 views

The position of “always” in different sentences [closed]

I want to know about the position of always in different sentences. For example: Always she is tidy and on time. Is it correct or not?
1
vote
3answers
769 views

Difference between “Can't you” and “Can you not”?

I've been wondering about the difference between questions that use can't you and can you not. Like: Can't you tell just by looking? [I read this from a comic-detective series] Can you not ...
1
vote
1answer
202 views

“Take something into account” vs “Take into account something” — are both correct?

Are the two usages both correct? Personally, I'd prefer take something into account but I have heard some professors and academic textbook authors prefer take into account something. ...
-2
votes
2answers
153 views

Position of “to” in a sentence

Which of the following is grammatically correct and why? I got less time to focus per course. I got less time per course to focus on. Edit: I want to convey the idea that because I took ...
1
vote
2answers
108 views

“I will rob you of it” vs. “I will rob it of you”

Which of these is grammatically correct, and why? I will rob you of it I will rob it of you
0
votes
1answer
467 views

has just had or just had a baby

My question is not whether the correct grammar is either "She has just had a baby" or "She just had a baby". I am aware that the official grammar is "She has just had a baby". But in a way that ...
-1
votes
1answer
974 views

“They had already decided what to do” vs. “they had decided what to do already”

I was surprised that they had already decided what to do. I was surprised that they had decided what to do already. Which sentence is correct?
0
votes
1answer
266 views

Do all variations of this sentence seem grammatically correct? [duplicate]

There is an interesting English sentence which is making rounds in the social media nowadays. It goes like this: For the following sentence, add the word "only" anywhere in this sentence, and ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“There are still problems” vs. “there still are problems”

There are still problems. There still are problems. Is one word order more correct than the other and do they have identical meaning?
2
votes
3answers
439 views

“This helps us how?” vs. “How does this help us?”

In the sci-fi movie Inception by Christopher Nolan, in the first level of dreaming, they kidnap Cilian Murphy and Tom Hardy tries to get some information from him, by impersonating Browning, his ...
0
votes
1answer
149 views

“a high enough” vs. “high enough a”

After editing a question recently, the OP undid those edits stating he did not like the bad changes I made with regards to the grammar of the post. The author originally wrote: Nobody in this ...
2
votes
1answer
577 views

Inversion with “many times” at the beginning of a sentence

I am having a discussion with my friend. I said, "Many times I have seen him washing his car." He says it should be, "Many times have I seen him washing his car. Much like "Often do I see him", and ...
1
vote
2answers
132 views

Why is “till” used in this expression: “If we don't leave till after lunch…”?

If we don't leave till after lunch we'll be cutting it very fine. I understand it to mean: "If we don't leave after lunch, we'll be cutting it very fine." (In the event of our not leaving ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“Having not” vs “not having”

I did a bit of searching on the difference between "not having" and "having not", but I could not find a convincing argument. I typed this sentence; Congratulations on not having given up yet! ...
-3
votes
1answer
251 views

In this sentence, does the word “as” make it sound like the speaker was the leader? [closed]

Oh, to illustrate the frustration as the leader, for the fifth year changed the rules; I could barely nod my head!
1
vote
2answers
377 views

Is saying “Let me show you it” totally wrong?

My kids (8-10yrs) love to saying things like this. It just rolls naturally out and I correct them often. Is there is a specific reason the grammar is wrong? Maybe for the brain it is more direct than ...
1
vote
2answers
345 views

Statements beginning with subject+wonder

I'm wondering about the sentence structure when you use wonder. Take for instance: I wonder when will my money be refunded. I wonder when my money will be refunded. I wonder when is my ...
-5
votes
1answer
146 views

“Enter the password 1234” vs. “enter 1234 for a password” [closed]

Which sentence is correct? Enter the password 1234. Enter 1234 for a password.
-1
votes
1answer
529 views

“more people becoming increasingly xxx” or “more people increasingly becoming xxx”

I need a bit of guidance regarding the following sentence. Which of the three variants is grammatical? Are more people becoming increasingly intolerant? Are more people increasingly becoming ...
0
votes
2answers
461 views

“Sometimes also” or “also sometimes”?

I have a sentence where I think I could use either of these two constructions. They seem very similar in meaning, so I'm not sure which I should prefer. There might be some subtle point of grammar ...
-3
votes
3answers
100 views

Positions of “of which” [closed]

I am not sure how to use of which here. I do know I could use whose, I would just like to understand this structure more. Each bag contains a number of bank notes (bills). And now: Select the ...
-3
votes
1answer
461 views

Usage of “I am afraid” [closed]

What kind of sentence should follow the phrase "I am afraid", assertive or interogative? For example, is the following sentence grammatical? I am afraid is it appropriate ask me a copy of it.
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Use of “yet another” in the middle of a sentence

Is the usage of yet another correct in the following sentence? This sentence might need yet another piece of work for you! Where can I place yet another in a sentence?
-2
votes
2answers
116 views

“Do I believe the sky above” vs. “I do believe the sky above” [closed]

I’m Brazilian and I have a question. Why does Enya say the following in her song “Caribbean Blue”? So the world goes round and round With all you ever knew They say the sky high above Is ...
1
vote
3answers
417 views

How should this sentence be structured?

I want to know which one of these two sentence structures is correct grammatically: This book is, despite being dense, a good read. This book, despite being dense, is a good read.
1
vote
3answers
497 views

“I was really thinking” vs. “I really was thinking”

Which one of the following is correct? I was really thinking to do that. I really was thinking to do that.
1
vote
4answers
605 views

“I and others” or “others and I”?

I have traditionally learned that a first-person pronoun should always come last in a list, e.g. Bob and I found this to be interesting. However, it sounds awkward to me when this rule is used ...
4
votes
6answers
62k views

“Belated happy birthday” or “happy belated birthday”?

What's the correct sentence? Belated happy birthday! Happy belated birthday!
0
votes
1answer
640 views

“Enables you to quickly and easily identify” vs. “enables you to identify quickly and easily” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? I'm currently having a bit of a dispute and would appreciate your help please. Which one is ...
0
votes
2answers
429 views

Can a verb split a subject and its attributive prepositional phrase?

Recently a program gave me this text in a dialog box: "All purchases have been downloaded for this account." While I understand its meaning, splitting the subject (the noun and its attributive phrase) ...
3
votes
5answers
395 views

“Will shortly appear automatically” — what is the correct order of words in this fragment?

I want to say that an answer will appear shortly, and automatically, on the screen. I'm not sure whether the correct sentence is: The answer will shortly appear automatically. or maybe: The ...
1
vote
3answers
466 views

The placement of “only” in a sentence with perfect continuous tense and “been”

I was just wondering if there is a significant difference between placing "only" before and after the word "been". Examples: I've only been fixing cars since I was young. vs I've been only ...
3
votes
1answer
250 views

Positioning “only” in “I have worked with X” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” Which of the following sentences are correct? I have worked with only Mr. X. I have worked only with Mr. X. I have only worked with ...
-2
votes
1answer
120 views

When tagging a picture, which statement is correct if it includes yourself and a friend? I was taught friend's name then mine [duplicate]

Duplicate of: John, Valencia, and I (or me)? “My friends and I” vs. “My friends and me” vs. “Me and my friends” Is naming the first person last proper grammar or just proper manners? And ...
4
votes
5answers
1k views

“How best to handle” vs. “how to best handle”

Are there rules on the placement of 'best'? They are deciding how to best handle the matter. They are deciding how best to handle the matter. Is one of them wrong?
1
vote
2answers
366 views

''I don't know what" + direct object [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Changing subject and verb positions in statements and questions Why do we put the verb to be at the end of these questions? Is the expression I don't know what is ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

“Where am I?” vs. “Where I am?” [closed]

Which is more correct to say in a question? (For example a guy that wakes up in a train) "Where am I?" or "Where I am?"
1
vote
1answer
82 views

“I ordered us…” vs. “I ordered for us…” vs “I ordered … for us”

I usually use a phrase such as: (1) I ordered us a box. Would it be more correct to say: (2) I ordered for us a box. Or, better still: (3) I ordered a box for us. Example 3 sounds ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

“You should have also named” vs. “you should also have named”

Out of the two sentences, which one is correct? You should have also named it the Daily prophet. You should also have named it the Daily prophet. My guess is it's the first one.
5
votes
1answer
138 views

When to put a verb ahead of its doer?

I have read this at the Science.com, and it's in the second line of the last paragraph. A bow and arrow or an atlatl allows users to attack prey—and enemies—from a safer distance than does an ...