0
votes
3answers
61 views

Should the verb of the independent clause come before or after the dependent clause?

Which of the following is correct? The Boeing 777 crashed, carrying 227 passengers and a crew of 12 members, into international waters. The Boeing 777, carrying 227 passengers and a crew of ...
-1
votes
2answers
77 views

Is this proper English? [closed]

The content analysis study our group undertook clearly indicates that, television advertisements and possibly the media as a whole, present children as exhibiting gender stereotypical behaviour.
0
votes
1answer
69 views

divine a purpose = a divine purpose?

After reading and pondering on the answer for: http://philosophy.stackexchange.com/questions/8928/albert-einstein-on-divining-the-purpose-of-life/10169#10169 I wonder if the words marked in bold ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Economic Fact or Fact of Economics?

Demand will rise when prices fall is a basic economic fact/basic fact of economics? Which of these two is most appropriate and why?
2
votes
1answer
122 views

Is “I, too, did it” correct

I've heard sentences such as "I, too, did something," in which I would have used "I also did it," or "I did it as well," or "I did it, too." In school I've been taught I have to put 'as well' and ...
0
votes
2answers
252 views

Subject-verb inversion / verb-subject-object — is this correct?

I recently read the following in a schoolbook: Wrote the researchers, "[...]" I wonder if this is correct English. I have seen it a couple of more times. Is this just a matter of preference? ...
0
votes
2answers
743 views

Can I use “what are you talking about.” with the words in that order? [closed]

We've got a dispute on the point whether the phrase should be "What you are talking about." or "What are you talking about." in the affirmative sentence. I was arguing that it should be the former, ...
1
vote
2answers
356 views

Noun order: “He and we…” or “We and he…”? Similarly, “…him and us” or “…us and him”?

It's convention and polite to always list yourself last in a list. I say "John and I went to the store" and not "I and John went to the store." So does that mean that I should always list myself ...
0
votes
2answers
585 views

Does the position of “while” in a sentence affect its meaning?

"While I hate to watch TV, my wife loves it very much." (self-made) When denoting a contrast, "while" is to be in the beginning of the first clause. I complained about the unfair competition in ...
2
votes
2answers
271 views

position of “only”

Which sentence is correct? (A) Mosquito larvae can only be seen through a microscope. (B) Mosquito larvae can be only seen through a microscope. (C) Mosquito larvae can be seen only through ...
5
votes
4answers
402 views

“Mom and Dad” vs “Dad and Mom”

I'm curious if the order implies anything here. I'm pretty sure "Mom and Dad" is standard in English. The issue was hard for me to google, so I'm asking it here: Is using "Dad" before "Mom" ...
4
votes
1answer
158 views

Always vs Every day

I have lunch at school every day vs I always have lunch at school. Why does the frequency adverb, always, go before the verb, have, whereas the expression, "every day" is placed at the end of ...
35
votes
7answers
5k views

Why use “of” in the phrase “delivered of a baby”?

With all the "Royal baby" craze comes something that really confuses me. All the news media used pretty much the same sentence to make the announcement: The Duchess of Cambridge has been ...
1
vote
2answers
270 views

Does a name go before or after the noun it modifies?

The sentence The user “John Smith” has been registered; go to the “User Profile” tab to view the user’s details. reads more naturally to me than The “John Smith” user has been registered; go ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

What is the correct use of “even” as an adverb, with the verb “to be”?

http://www.onestopenglish.com/community/your-english/word-grammar/your-english-word-grammar-even/156431.article gives some examples of correct use of "even" as an adverb to indicate that something is ...
2
votes
1answer
825 views

Should I say “have only been . . . twice” or “have been . . . twice only”?

Will these next two sentences confuse you? 1.I have only been to London once before. 2.I have been to London twice only. Now for a more complicated example, I want to express that I have ...
17
votes
3answers
686 views

You don't want to answer this word-placement question, now do you?

Prompted by this question I got to thinking about the placement of the word now. If it's placed before the comma, it refers to an immediate condition: You don't want to answer this word-placement ...
2
votes
0answers
31 views

Is the phrase “fresh six muffins” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the rule for adjective order? A non-native speaker that I know always puts the count before another adjective, as in "fresh six muffins". "Six fresh muffins" ...
18
votes
6answers
2k views

When can the -ing form of a verb be placed before a noun?

My native-speaker's grammatical intuition tells me that: There is a sleeping man under the tree. is fine but There is a fishing man by the river bank. is wrong. Why? I've thought about ...
-1
votes
1answer
733 views

How to create a questions from past modal verb sentences

I have no idea why my question was closed as it was pretty clear (at least for a person of average intelligence) so I am trying again: There is a sentence, e.g: He could have seen that. Will the ...
2
votes
3answers
208 views

Loathe. The atypical use of the verb [closed]

I have a quick question about the atypical grammar of mine. I am a poet using iambic pentameter. The question is whether the following is grammatically correct: I she loathes. That I loathe. ...
5
votes
2answers
178 views

“Imperial Japanese Navy” or “Japanese Imperial Navy”?

Is it "Imperial Japanese Navy" or "Japanese Imperial Navy", and why?
1
vote
0answers
19 views

Word order in subject sentences (questions) [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Usage of “What” + verb without auxiliary one I have probably not used the correct term but I am sure you will get it. If a question has do-support, then in ...
2
votes
4answers
808 views

“Run over XXX” or “run XXX over”

I would need to clarify which one is correct. My dictionary says “run somebody over” (meaning hit by car) and an example: I ran over the dog. On the internet I found: I’m afraid we’ve just ...
6
votes
3answers
344 views

Moving the interrogative pro-adverb to the end of a question

I am not a native speaker of English. From what I learn, 'wh' questions in English should normally be like this: Why should we believe you? How did she participate in the massacre? However, ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

The time before place mantra [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the rule for adjective order? As a Dutch schoolboy, during English grammar lessons (long ago...) I got one rule hammered into my head like a mantra: time before ...
2
votes
1answer
334 views

What's it called when you make an adjective post-positive? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why do some adjectives follow the nouns they modify? In English, adjectives usually precede the nouns they describe, as in "organic carrots". However, in some cases ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Why do some adjectives follow the nouns they modify?

Right now I can only think of one instance in which this regularly occurs. The adjective proper is sometimes placed after the noun it modifies, e.g: Reptilia: A class of cold-blooded oviparous or ...
0
votes
2answers
170 views

What does “From Twitter came” mean? [closed]

Is this sentence in italics correct grammatically? Is it written in inverted order? If we rewrite this sentence, is it Came from Twitter? From Twitter came, "@dannyhakim Pictures of flooded ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Usage of “just”, “only” and word-order [intended meaning]

I've got these sentences, which meanings are correct (my interpretations are in brackets): Use of only: (1) Only in 1996, Ford sold a rebadged Mazda 626 GV over here as its rebranded Japanese ...
1
vote
1answer
506 views

Word-order and meaning - which is correct for this notice? [closed]

I'm creating some signs for the office car park, and one of these signs is to control access. What I'm trying to get it to indicate is that cars aren't permitted between 10 am and 4pm except for ...
1
vote
1answer
888 views

“Done soon” vs. “soon done”

There are a number of colloquial expressions common to my area (see here, for example). I'm relatively recent to the area, so there are a number of expressions that just sound unnatural to me. ...
3
votes
2answers
860 views

Can “I wonder” be put at the end of a sentence?

Usually sentences with "I wonder" are of the following form: I wonder why _______. But what about this? Why is it that _______ I wonder. It seems relatively unnatural. Why is that? Is it ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

Why is “xxxx doth not a yyyy make” considered valid English?

Reading doth not a writer make. This sounds all wrong so why it is acceptable to use? The word order looks to be all out sequence (Object-Subject-Verb). It should be "reading does not make you a ...
3
votes
5answers
305 views

“The place where we promised to meet”

This is talking about a promise to meet at a certain place. However, is it grammatically correct? Is it badly phrased? It seems that it can be misinterpreted to mean that at a certain place a promise ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Why do we invert word order when asking a question?

What's the difference between an inverted question and a normal-order question? Why invert? Is there a reason or a benefit? I love you? Do I love you?
0
votes
2answers
7k views

“I was wondering what/which are …” or “I was wondering what/which … are”

I can understand saying "I was wondering how is A doing?" is not grammatically correct. Instead we should say "I was wondering how A is doing?". On the other hand, I was wondering which one or both ...
1
vote
1answer
459 views

“can't afford to (or don't want to)” or “can't afford (or don't want) to”

Is one of the following preferable to the other: can't afford to (or don't want to) can't afford (or don't want) to
4
votes
3answers
715 views

Are there any rules on the positioning adverbs should take in a sentence?

For example: Ever wish you could share information broadly Could it be rewritten to: Ever wish you could broadly share information Are there any rules for the position of the adverbs.
6
votes
3answers
4k views

“currently not” or “not currently”

What's the correct order: Lessons are not currently being offered. or Lessons are currently not being offered.
8
votes
2answers
4k views

Prepositions at the end of sentence and whom

I believe it's okay to end a sentence with a preposition. That seems to be the consensus here as well. Now I think that when who is the object of a preposition, it should technically be whom, e.g. ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

“Subject, verb, direct object, object complement” versus “subject, verb, indirect object, direct object”

Reading English Grammar (HarperCollins College Outline, published by HarperResource, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers) I found a chapter (Sentence Basics) that explains that in English there are ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Changing subject and verb positions in statements and questions

We always change subject and verb positions in whenever we want to ask a question such as "What is your name?". But when it comes to statements like the following, which form is correct? I ...