1
vote
1answer
1k views

What is differences between “Dear and Darling”? [closed]

What is differences between them? Are they similar or not? Dear Mrs. Smith. John, darling, could you pass me the sugar, please? Johnny dear, please listen up. May I introduce my dear ...
1
vote
1answer
131 views

Does changing the position of an adjective, change the meaning of the sentence?

What are the differences in meaning between these sentences? The weather is hot on the island. The weather on the island is hot. On the island, the weather is hot. Do they mean the ...
0
votes
3answers
79 views

“In [noun] terms” vs. “in terms of [noun]”

What are the differences in meaning between the followings? In society terms In terms of society
0
votes
1answer
93 views

“distinguish them more completely” vs. “more completely distinguish them”

Is there a rule I could tell the difference between: Both A and B have other attributes that distinguish them more completely. Both A and B have other attributes that more completely ...
-1
votes
2answers
131 views

Placing “first” in a sentence; would it change the meaning?

How does the meaning of the following two sentences differ? I first wanted to tell you about it. I wanted to tell you about it first.
-1
votes
1answer
164 views

“The judge is god” or “The god is judge”?

In a scene in The great debaters, Denzel Washington's character asks his students to reiterate some lines. He asks: Who is the judge? And the students reply: The judge is god. Now, why is ...
1
vote
4answers
219 views

“It can be safely deleted” vs. “It can safely be deleted”

Is there a subtle difference between the following two sentences? It can be safely deleted. It can safely be deleted. If they mean the same thing, is one preferred for other reasons?
3
votes
1answer
268 views

Positioning “only” in “I have worked with X” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” Which of the following sentences are correct? I have worked with only Mr. X. I have worked only with Mr. X. I have only worked with ...
2
votes
2answers
6k views

“They all are fine” vs. “they are all fine” [closed]

The situation is that someone asks me how my family are; I then want to answer that they all are fine. I want to know whether the sentences "They all are fine." and "They are all fine." have the ...
3
votes
3answers
119 views

Difference between “advantages of a car lease” and “car lease advantages”

It is hard for foreigners to understand the meaning of different English sentence constructions. Do the phrases below mean the same? advantages of a car lease car lease advantages When do ...
8
votes
4answers
645 views

“Back up data” or “back data up”?

Which is correct? To back up data. To back data up. The context is the following: He was careful enough to perform tests and [back up data | back data up] to avoid any problems.
0
votes
1answer
699 views

“Data source types” vs. “types of data sources”

Is there any difference in meaning between "Many different data source types" and "Many different types of data sources"? I have no strong understanding on the use of "of".
27
votes
8answers
43k views

Distinction: “What can I do you for?” vs. “What can I do for you?”

Usually, when being served the phrase "What can I do for you?" is used but sometimes I also hear "What can I do you for?" in quite the same context. So is there a difference or is it just a slip of ...
2
votes
3answers
101 views

Which of these sentences is better? [closed]

The user is redirected to your web page after the click. After the click, the user is redirected to your web page. Which kind of sentence should be used, the first, the second, or neither?