This tag is for questions about the correct order of words in a phrase, or a sentence.

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0
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1answer
47 views

However in the middle of a sentence

I wonder if I can use however like in this sentence: The lecture however does cover a lot of information, still doesn't explain the main subject. Sounds a bit awkward to me, but it still seems ...
1
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2answers
67 views

In what order should you say people's names?

I know that when you include someone, you say their name first. For example: "John and I went to the beach" How do you order the names when there are more than one additional people? For example: ...
-1
votes
1answer
35 views

I care not (for these things) vs. I don't care

Is the expression "I care not" grammatically correct? Do I care not and I don't care have the same meaning?
2
votes
3answers
43 views

Is it wrong to use 'not" in sentences that have an “all…not” form

All of the women in the district did not vote for the lone female candidate. What, if any, is the semantic problem in the above sentence. I was suggested the below sentence by my senior peers. ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Placement of adjective “only”

I have the following sentence and three versions to write it: Ensure string only contains printable ASCII characters. Ensure string contains only printable ASCII characters. Ensure string ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Delayed relative clause

Consider the following phrase taken from a draft of my master's thesis: In this chapter, the fundamental physiological principles will be presented that underlie the mathematical models and ...
1
vote
2answers
49 views

Word order in question with very long subject

The normal word order for a wh- question in English is: wh- + auxiliary + subject + verb. Hence the sentence below should be correct: What might the consequences of the loss of diversity of plant ...
0
votes
1answer
76 views

“been often” vs “often been” [closed]

Which of these is the correct form: techniques have been often used for post-processing or techniques have often been used for post-processing
1
vote
0answers
25 views

“Above thing” or “thing above” [duplicate]

I don't know which is correct, it seems both can be used? "The above gun shows..." or "the gun above shows.." Also the below gun or the gun below, which is correct?
2
votes
3answers
82 views

order of adjectives - deleted recent questions vs recent deleted questions

From what is introduced here, "recent" is a kind of age and "deleted" seems to be a kind of specific opinion, so this structure seems to be correct: "deleted recent questions". Actually I was ...
0
votes
2answers
56 views

“Is it for when?” vs. “When is it for?”

I always get confused which of the following is correct: Is it for when? When is it for? Or are there further ways to ask for when something is needed. The it in question is an ...
5
votes
3answers
203 views

should be always or should always be? [duplicate]

I am not a native speaker, I do not know how to say this properly: "It should be always on", or "It should always be on"? Is there any difference?
1
vote
2answers
36 views

where to place *further* , *considering further*

As the closing sentence of a cover letter for an application I would like to write the sentence I would appreciate your further considering my application and remain... but is this correct, or ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Wedge between the related verbs?

At the beginning of 1807, based on information gathered from Burr’s correspondence allegedly showing that he had begun preparations for a large-scale military expedition, the former vice ...
6
votes
5answers
729 views

Why is this sentence: “Additional nine features were added…” incorrect?

I am trying to explain to a colleague why the sentence: Additional nine features were added to the dig is incorrect. I have said you can say "An additional nine features...", "Nine additional ...
3
votes
2answers
129 views

The Order of Modification in English Nouns, Preceding or Succeeding? [closed]

As I don't know the exact linguistic terms, what I mean my "preceding" and "succeeding" in modifying nouns is as follows. Preceding : delicious food, long way, kind person, et cetera Succeeding : ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Are “prop the door open” and “prop open the door” both correct?

So I feel like "prop open the door" is correct over "prop the door open" because the former splits the verbs, but the latter sounds better to me, for reasons I don't know. Is either correct over the ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Position of always/continuously in these sentences

I have two sentences: 1.- On and beneath the earth's surface, new rock is made and old rock is destroyed ______________. 2.- The rock cycle occurs ______________________, over millions of years. ...
1
vote
1answer
107 views

“You still have got …” vs “You've still got”

In a discussion on Hacker News, titled: Not on a Social Network? You’ve Still Got a Privacy Problem somebody commented that it should say: Not on a Social Network? You Still Have Got a ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

order or adjuncts and adjectives

The more thought I give about the order of adjuncts and adjectives before a noun, the less sense it all makes. Not a native speaker, but using English on a daily basis. For instance, in "Relational ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

“I actually might have to X” vs. “I might actually have to X” vs. “I might have to actually X”

Even if there are four fan headers on the motherboard my computer case accommodates six fans (3x140mm, 3x120mm) so I actually might have to purchase an external fan hub. Where should I put the ...
3
votes
2answers
211 views

Can I use the adjective as the first word?

Is it okay if I rearrange the sentence The apple on the table was green or The green apple was on the table to put the adjective in front, as the first word, like Green, was the apple on ...
2
votes
1answer
129 views

A correct way to place a verb in a “double” question

I'm not sure what the correct way for placing a verb in such cases is: "May I ask what Australia’s policy is regarding this scheme?" or should it be "May I ask what is Australia’s policy regarding ...
1
vote
0answers
54 views

word order of here + adverb + noun, e.g. here used method

I have been encountering several examples (in scientific papers), where people used constructions like "the here used method", "the here investigated case", etc.. I have been thinking that it is ...
4
votes
4answers
785 views

Why do some questions not start with an auxiliary verb?

When I learned English, my teachers told me that all questions must have an auxiliary verb at the beginning, just like Are you mad? or Is she playing? do. But when watching some movies or talking ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

“opted not to” vs “opted to not” [closed]

Is there a difference between "opted not to" and "opted to not"? Which is correct to use in this example: "I opted to not|opted not to receive messages from this mailing list".
1
vote
1answer
76 views

Ordering prepositional phrases

I have rewritten a sentence like the one below several times, and I could not seem to put the prepositional phrases in an order that sounded correct to me. Is there a better way to construct this ...
0
votes
4answers
90 views

Order of words and punctuation in a sentence [closed]

I am writing a sentence whose word order and punctuation has put me in a fix. Can I get some opinions on whether the construction is correct, grammatically? Ask him what becomes of the dogs he ...
2
votes
2answers
130 views

“I'm no more hungry” or “I'm no longer hungry” or “I'm hungry no more.” [closed]

I'm no more hungry I don't think I've heard the first one very often, but wasn't sure about the last two. I'm no longer hungry and I'm hungry no more Which of these three sentences ...
0
votes
2answers
127 views

I will learn better English — should it be “I will learn English better.”

Somehow, I think "better English" is incorrect, because I think there isn't better English; English is English. But I hear this phrase from other ESL students a lot. Is this correct way of saying it? ...
10
votes
6answers
1k views

Does order matter when writing a sentence including aunt and uncle?

While I was translating the sentence "Mi tío y mi tía estaban caminando en esa calle cuando vieron tu coche," on DuoLingo, I got dinged for translating the sentence to "My aunt and uncle were walking ...
2
votes
2answers
104 views

Where should “a lot” be placed in a sentence?

Which of these is right? I like to play with my dog a lot. I like a lot to play with my dog. I like to play a lot with my dog. Any of the above. I mean, where does a lot go in there? I searched ...
3
votes
1answer
115 views

Word ordering for sequels of works whose titles start with 'The'

Hopefully a simple one, but my Google-fu is letting me down. Typically, when alpabetising titles, I would move the 'The' to the end of the title but, in the case of a sequel, should that be moved to ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

Does the order matter in being “okay with”

Are the following two sentences interchangeable? "Are you okay with that?" "Is that okay with you?"
0
votes
2answers
140 views

Is it possible to say so very and very so?

I know that it is correct to use: Thank you so very much. As much as I know an adverb can be theoretically used to modify another adverb, so my question is: Is it possible to say very so ...
1
vote
2answers
100 views

Customer Technical Support or Technical Customer Support?

I am part of a customer support team. When answering a new email request from a customer I start my reply with an introduction: Hi, John Doe here from the [What-goes-here?] team at ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Order of “noun + describing noun”

Which one is correct or preferred? The command /reload is... < some description > The /reload command is... < some description >
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Verb to be before pronoun in declarative sentences [duplicate]

I saw this sentence in a newspaper cartoon: Not only are you dysfunctional — you appear to be completely spineless as well. Is the verb are in the right position?
0
votes
1answer
105 views

The word order and prepositions in an example

Background to the sentence: a system activates itself after temperature has been deviated for [X] seconds. Now I want to describe what X does and I just cannot figure it out. My best attempts are: ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Order of words in sentence

I am asked the following the question: Question: Why are your results important? Answer: For segmenting and classifying a stream of documents dynamically without a fixed training ...
3
votes
1answer
67 views

Fronted adjuncts

Is it correct to begin sentences with adjuncts? To which degree are the sentences below acceptable? Do you need a special context to license this word order, or can you start a text with these ...
-1
votes
1answer
51 views

«Said I» vs «I said»

Are «said I» and «I said» interchangeable? «Said I» is pretty uncommon, or so I thought. The sentence in question looks like so: «"It's not going to be your way," — said I.» Or it could be «"It's not ...
0
votes
2answers
83 views

A simple question about syntax [closed]

I guess this would be a pretty simple question to answer. Is this sentence correct: The player appears to have not connected. I am having my doubts about the appears to have not part. P.S.: Not ...
1
vote
3answers
124 views

'Which were a size too small.' or 'which size were too small.' Which one is correct?

The whole sentence is Mr Boxell had deliberately sold the man a pair of shoes which were a size too small, knowing he would return them next day! I'm so confused about which were a size too ...
3
votes
2answers
594 views

“The more…, the less…” sentence with the same verb

I'm kinda ok with basic "The more..., the less..." type of sentences, like The more you think about it, the less likely you are to take action, but what if I want to say next: The more ...
1
vote
2answers
108 views

“Neither he had” vs “he neither had”

Example: Despite the fact he was nearing his thirties and got stressed a lot at work, he still had a full head of hair. No thinning at all. [Neither/he] had wrinkles, and his face was still long ...
-1
votes
1answer
86 views

just/only usage

Isn't there a difference (or aren't there differences) with the following? I only drive to work on Fridays I drive only to work on Fridays I drive to work only on Fridays I drive to work on Fridays ...
0
votes
2answers
156 views

Adverb order: 'has largely been' or 'has been largely' [duplicate]

Does the placement of an adverb affect its meaning or application? Does each paired sentence here mean the same as the other? 1.1 Mobile technology progress has largely been consumer-driven ...
0
votes
2answers
104 views

Complex question starting with 'I wonder'

I want to ask about some plans, which I want to define in the question. And I want to start with I wonder. So something like: I wonder what the plans for the next steps regarding the topic we ...
2
votes
1answer
80 views

“Blue colour” or “Colour blue”

Recently I started learning english on busuu.com. In on of the elementary exercices "Colours", that I performed, the following phrase was stated as the correct answer: "I like the colour blue" ...