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0
votes
1answer
32 views

Is it Game time or game-time? [duplicate]

I'm trying to verify the correctness the following sentence: Game time is Sunday. Is it correct or should it be "Game-time"?
0
votes
2answers
117 views

Sentences which read the same forwards as they do with their words (not characters!) reversed

Are there sentences which read the same backwards as well as forwards once the order of words is reversed? What is the name of such sentences? Just to clarify, I'm not talking about palindromes, in ...
2
votes
2answers
74 views

Two or more words with the same plural

Let a multiplural be a word that has more than one singular form with different meanings. For example, AXES is the plural of both AX and AXIS and so is a multiplural. I have found these multiplurals: ...
9
votes
5answers
3k views

How many different parts of speech can the f-word be used as?

In an "interesting" thread of comments we began to look at the word fuck in several different uses. Most of them were interjections and verb uses as would be expected. But, perhaps dialectally, the ...
0
votes
4answers
94 views

Comma placement

Ok, just for fun, this sentence makes perfect sense when spoken, but in print, where would you put the commas? I say at that that that that that that that refers to is not that that at all.
3
votes
2answers
131 views

English term for switching phonemes between words? [duplicate]

Is there the English term for switching phonemes between words, creating something like Freudian mistakes? For example, changing 'lumberjack' to 'jumper's luck'. As fair as I can remember, one of ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

What's it called when you switch the order of two words around?

What's it called when you switch the order of two words around, completely changing their meaning? For example, simply childish becomes childishly simple. Or wonderfully sarcastic becomes ...
10
votes
3answers
634 views

Term for a word that is unintentionally made up of two or more other words?

For example, therapist may be split into the + rapist, neither of which (arguably) has anything to do with the original words. Another example would be conflagration: con + flag + ration. Or ...
4
votes
2answers
427 views

Isogrammatic sentences?

A pangram is a sentence that uses each letter of the alphabet at least once. Pack my box with five dozen liquor jugs. How vexingly quick daft zebras jump. A perfect pangram uses each letter of the ...
4
votes
4answers
477 views

Is there a verb that fits in the pattern: quarter, third, halve (divide), [???], double, triple, quadruple. . .?

If these were nouns, I would assume "single" fits in between: 1/4, 1/3, 1/2, 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . quarter, third, half, single or one, double, triple, quadruple . . . Note that each word has a ...
1
vote
2answers
240 views

Relationship words for a 'Semantic Network' and also a Sentence Dilemma

The two sentences below are for a user input form for a semantic network. It is a standard, HTML-based form with two drop down menus (the square brackets represent the drop-down menus). Users use the ...
16
votes
2answers
2k views

What do you call words that look like a negation but are not?

I can be nonplussed (in fact that is practically the ground state of my existence), but not plussed. I can also be indifferent; but if you are different, that doesn't mean you care, either. What do ...
89
votes
10answers
7k views

Is there a word for a person with only one head?

Reading this article by the fantastic Douglas Adams I came across this interesting quote: ‘[I]nteractivity’ is one of those neologisms that Mr Humphrys likes to dangle between a pair of verbal ...
9
votes
3answers
1k views

Rime of the Ancient Mariner?

I recently read the beautiful poem by Samuel Coleridge. Why did he call it a rime? I looked up rime on the dictionary, and it means a thin layer of ice; so was the name playing around with the rhyme ...
17
votes
2answers
871 views

“Some champagne for my real friends, some real pain for my sham friends.”

Some champagne for my real friend, some real pain for my sham friends." Is there a name for this kind of sentence? Note: I'm not sure the origin of this, but it is a line in Spike Lee's movie, ...
4
votes
3answers
5k views

Words whose pronunciation remains the same with the last four letters removed

A friend told me that the English word queue is the only word whose pronunciation remains the same when the last four letters are removed. I tried to think of others, but just couldn't. However, I ...
8
votes
4answers
9k views

What word contains the most unique letters?

I'm assuming there isn't a word that contains every letter in the alphabet, so which word contains the most? Examples: antidisestablishmentarianism - 12 [antidseblhmr] psychotherapy - 12 ...
4
votes
6answers
24k views

What is the longest English word that starts and ends with the same letter?

I've found "enterprise", which is 10 letters long. Does anyone know of any longer words that start and end with the same letter? That letter doesn't have to be 'e', by the way. It just means that the ...
6
votes
2answers
921 views

What does “piracy pirates” mean?

What does the following phrase mean? In Soviet Russia, piracy pirates YOU. What is implied by "piracy pirates YOU" and what by "IN Soviet Russia"? Update 1: My difficulty was because the term ...
5
votes
6answers
4k views

Simple yet interesting English game for class? [closed]

I'll be hosting an English activity this week. Could you share some interesting English games which impressed you the most?
13
votes
1answer
1k views

What's the origin of Pig Latin?

Having studied Latin at High School and not being a native English native speaker, I have trouble understanding what the point of Pig Latin is. The text transformation rules, indeed, bring to ...
11
votes
4answers
3k views

English term for a word that differs from another one by just one letter

When I was a child, pretty much every children's magazine I subscribed to used to publish those little word-chain games where you had to get from one word to another — often an antonym — by replacing ...