This tag is for questions about choosing the best word for a particular context or meaning.

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2
votes
2answers
58 views

'before' or 'in front of'?

Which sentence is the correct one? He parked his BMW directly before the diner. or He parked his BMW directly in front of the diner.
2
votes
2answers
84 views

Information unavailable to the audience

What is it called when a character knows something the audience doesn't? For example, if the character was stating something obvious like "today is your birthday", saying it only to inform the ...
1
vote
2answers
64 views

What is the word for what an applicant applies to?

If you are applying to a school you are an "applicant". What is the word for the thing you're applying to? Similar to the sentence "the stalker stalks the stalkee", what would be in the blank in the ...
1
vote
2answers
119 views

Is there a better word than “helpee” to describe a person who receives help?

When I help someone, I am the helper, and he is the helpee. But surely there is a better word than this? I guess you could say "recipient of help" or "beneficiary", but I don't really like either of ...
0
votes
2answers
69 views

Do the following three expressions have the same meaning?

My flight is scheduled for 7 p.m. from New York. My flight is scheduled for New York at 7 p.m. My flight is scheduled for New York, 7 p.m.
0
votes
2answers
84 views

Usage of “I'm incredulous!” as an exclamation of shock or disbelief

Would the exclamation "I'm incredulous!" be an appropriate response to finding out some unexpected news, if the intention is to convey shock or disbelief?
1
vote
1answer
64 views

“Indispensible for” vs, “indispensible to”

What is the difference between "indispensible to" and "indispensible for"? Likewise, between "it is important to me" and "it is important for me", which one is correct?
1
vote
1answer
113 views

“What I'm looking for is/are [plural noun]”

Which one of the below is correct, and if both are correct in certain contexts, which is the preferred one? What I'm looking for is methods that help... What I'm looking for are the methods ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

“aiming to” vs “aimed to be”

I'm trying to define a goal for my scientific journal paper. What is the proper use of English language and grammar here? Does it make sense in its current form? We are running a study towards ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Finding Alternative Adjectives for “Very ___”

Is there a good resource for finding alternatives to using an adjective phrase intensified by the word "very", besides a thesaurus? (E.g., "very afraid" -> "terrified".) Thesauri provide wider-than ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Until, till, as long as

I will not go to the garden until my mother allows me I will not go to the garden as long as my mother doesn't allow me I will not go to the garden till my mother allows me: Are these sentences the ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

looking forward to our tennis battle? can I say this way?

I am sending an email to a friend/mentor. We have the same interest in tennis and during our past conversation, we said we would like to play together one day. Is it ok to say "I am looking forward ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Is it acceptable to use exiguous in such a way as this? Which of these is a better alternative to referring to one as stupid?

I am attempting to formulate a phrase that is an exceptional alternative to the banal "stupid". I have found some good contestants, but I feel that exiguous, if I am using it correctly, will fit the ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

One talk/paper, two speakers/authors

I'm looking for an English word which would replace "a seminar/conference talk where each co-author of the paper gives approximately one half of the talk" which may or may not exist.
0
votes
1answer
71 views

Formal words for “study hard” and “study roughly”?

I am writing my university application application, and want to explain why my grades during my exchange semester are not as elegant as normal semesters. I wish to express that I did not study them ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

When to use 'degree of' versus 'level of' in urban planning

Should we say, in urban planning, a certain level of compact development, or a certain degree of compact development?
0
votes
1answer
171 views

Trendy fashion phrases in press releases

How appropriate is it to use trendy fashion words in a press release? A fresh season truly requires a new wardrobe for the fashion-forward style setter. The surest bets? Stripes, lace, leather, ...
0
votes
1answer
117 views

Is “broad variety” in common usage? Better adjective?

A colleague used "broad variety" which sounds odd to me. I would go for "wide range", but is there a commonly used adjective with "variety" that can be substituted?
0
votes
1answer
57 views

“Habitat selection in/of birds”, “concept in/of statistics”, “theme in/of evolution”

It seems to me that in and of work equally well in sentences such as these: Habitat selection in birds is frequently studied. Habitat selection of birds is frequently studied. ...
0
votes
1answer
90 views

Use of the word “definitive edition”

Can I use the phrase "definitive edition" to explain that a product has the most up-to-date and highest quality in the field as opposite to mean "last edition of the same series"? Thank you for your ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Are there any conditions for using “would”?

In the following sentences, is on appropriate or for? Can the first about be omitted? Is would correct? On (for) actual LiDAR sensors, the lasers turn (about) or oscillate about an axis, as is ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

Qualifying a profile

Which of these adjectives is better used to qualify a profile (the width of an elongated object, such as in crossing profile)? low or small large or high Low crossing profile seems more common ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

“Deliver using/with/by the certificate”

In the fragment "to complete and deliver construction works to the customer using the Certificate of Work Completion", how can I change the word using (in the sense of "by what means")? Should I ...
-1
votes
1answer
59 views

Single word of “Senseless words”

I while back a heard a word that means 'senseless words' It was used in the following context: "You are speaking in ... " And the full phrase had the exact same meaning as "What you are saying is ...
-1
votes
1answer
120 views

how to say “etc” in a subject

I am translating some legal certificate and I need to indicate that a construction method and related factors are in accordance with a law. I am not sure what is the appropriate way to describe ...
-1
votes
1answer
87 views

“Any salary or compensation or experience certificate” vs. “any salary certificate or compensation certificate or experience certificate”

How should I write this? ... shall not be eligible for any salary or compensation or experience certificate if the Trainee fails to co-operate with XYZ for the exit formalities ... shall not ...
-1
votes
1answer
321 views

Is there difference between acne and pimples?

As title says: Is there difference between acne and pimples? As far as I know "acne" is skin condition, meaning that there are number of various "pimple" types on and under the skin.
-1
votes
1answer
94 views

“Tradeoff” usage

How is this word to be used in practice when a subject is also mentioned? I am interested in both the static situation of dealing with/being into/being subject to a tradeoff and the dynamic process ...
-1
votes
1answer
55 views

Is “morality in conduct of ..”" a natural expression?

Which one is better? There is a deep gap between morality in personal conduct of the officials and the public expectation for it. vs. There is a deep gap between the behavior of the ...
-1
votes
1answer
114 views

What are proper words to describe “one of the five finalists at a competition”

I am writing a SOP for grad school. When I was in undergrad, I once became one of five finalists at an IT competition. I want to write a sentence about it, but I'm not sure this is understandable ...
-1
votes
1answer
103 views

Can we say “in common sense way”?

"To understand this principle in common-sense way...." I heard a German teacher using "common-sense" this way, I think it is a little bit odd. Suppose I want to retain his idea, and modify the ...
-1
votes
1answer
66 views

What is the difference between “Distribution Worker” and “Distributing Worker”?

I cannot differentiate when I should use a noun like "distribution" as an adjective to another noun, or when should I use an "-ing" participle as an adjective. Could you please clarify the differences ...
-2
votes
1answer
49 views

Conviction vs. convictions

When using the terms "conviction" or "convictions" in the context of a firmly held belief, are these two words interchangeable or are they each used in specific circumstances. "Conviction" appears to ...
-2
votes
1answer
1k views

How should I thank someone for considering my job application?

My girlfriend is writing a cover letter for a job application and wants to thank the recipient for taking the time to review the application. She wrote the following closing sentence: Thank you ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Descry, Espy, Spot, Spy

I know as a general rule that no two words are identical in meaning and use. I was wondering if I could get help in understanding the different meanings and uses of descry, espy, spot and spy. I know ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Can “existing” ever refer to past existence?

It included a better warranty than John's existing one, which was exactly what John needed. Can existing/current refer to the warranty at the time in the past? It needs to express the idea that ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

“relaxed flying fingers” associated with ergonomic keyboard computer interface?

I want to start an open source software project and call it "relaxed flying fingers". The project is about a better keyboard interface, especially for touch typers (people typing with ten fingers). ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

including or included?

I'd greatly appreciate if someone could tell me whether both of the following are correct: Ageing concerns all of us, INCLUDING me. [I know this one is correct] Ageing concerns all of us, me ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

“I think she is not right” - is this sentence correct?

I know you can say "I don't think she's right" but I was wondering whether there is another way to say that.
0
votes
0answers
60 views

What's the difference between “to brag” and “to boast”

Sometimes this words are used interchanged in just two consecutive sentences, therefore I don't expect there to be a big and obvious difference. Nevertheless, since people use the English language, ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

regular exceptions vs. irregular exceptions

Are there any established words or phrases for the "exceptionless exceptions" to a general rule, exceptions that follow more specific rules that have their own logic, as opposed to exceptions that are ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Is a value something to “indicate” the valued thing?

Sorry for the confusing title. I came across the below sentence, and am wondering if the word "indicate" collocates with the word "value" as in this case: The PCS (Print Contrast Signal) is a ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

Is there a word similar to 'demonym' that is used for ethnicity instead of nationality?

For example, if I were discussing an American citizen of Chinese ethnicity and a Chinese tourist in America, would there be a word to categorize my use of the word 'Chinese' in this context? As the ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Referral Campaigns or Your Referral Schemes

I have a referral program which comprises of 50% UK users and 50% US users. Taking into account location, what would be the most appropriate title to use... Your Referral Campaigns Or Your ...
0
votes
0answers
69 views

What is the difference between “matter-containing media” and “matter”?

I'm reading the english wikipedia entry titled "Radiation". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiation you can find the word in the first paragraph, or by searching. so... What is the difference between ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

Using localising adjectives + adverbial construction with 'where'

I am wondering whether it is possible to use an adverbial phrase with 'where' to describe words like 'ashore' or 'aground'. Examples: I stepped ashore where the sun was filling with a red ...
0
votes
0answers
62 views

“Do you want” vs “Do you not want”

I recently came across a funny picture with these questions: Do you want som drugs? No Do you not want some drugs? Presumably the answear is supposed to be "no" since you always say no to drugs, ...
0
votes
0answers
104 views

Can the word 'fluently' be interchanged with 'fluidly' in this sentence, “I see I can't write fluidly either.”

I was asking a question concerning the use of the words 'fluently' or 'fluidly' in a particular sentence. I did not mean to post it as an Answer.
0
votes
0answers
779 views

Is there a difference between “each of which/some of which” and “each of them/some of them”?

Is there a difference between the expressions "each of which" and "each of them", and also for "some of which" and "some of them"? For example: The paragraph is composed of sentences, for each ...
-1
votes
0answers
42 views

The usage of every and each

We tend to use each if we are thinking about members of a group individually, and every if we are thinking of them in total. Compare the following: 1.We gave each child who came to the party a ...