This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning.

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0
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0answers
5 views

“Queuing twice for a cup of coffee is once too many.” Is this correct?

Or should I say "(...) once too often" or "(...) one time too many" instead?
3
votes
1answer
49 views

Can 'how easy something is' be used equally to 'how difficult something is' or are they already implying something?

I'm currently writing a text and I want to explain that I conducted some tests to see how easy/difficult it is do perform a certain process. Therefore I want to write: We now want to test how easy it ...
3
votes
8answers
508 views

A word to describe someone who isn't easily fooled or deceived?

Whats a good word to describe someone who isn't easily fooled or isn't gullible?
2
votes
4answers
58 views

Word for something that's worth remarking about

I'm solving a problem that people face every day: Developers spend a noticeable amount of time writing this type of code. Stating it's a "significant" problem seems too strong / an ...
2
votes
4answers
33 views

'Fine Results' is fine?

I'm currently working in a slogan and my outcome so far is something like Fine Results, Simple Methods However, by googling "fine results", the search results shows me that there is little to ...
1
vote
5answers
51 views

Single word for “ready again”?

Is there a single word for ready again ? Could it be re-ready? Example: I have multiple statuses: - not ready - ready - error - re-ready? Example: First document is unsigned, then signed, after ...
2
votes
2answers
216 views

Verbs for when asking someone(e.g designer) to do a job(logo design) for you for a fee

I would like to use a verb to describe the above situation. There are many professions like consultants,web designers which charge fees on project basis. Example answer for above question would be : ...
2
votes
2answers
29 views

What is a better way to say “deceptively deadly”?

While intended to mean "seemingly harmless but actually deadly", "deceptively" when used in the positive sense ("deceptively safe") inverts the meaning, and there's no reason it shouldn't do this in ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

This is right. Or that is right? [duplicate]

Opinions sought. I vaguely remember that the expression "This is right" (meaning "I agree with what you just said") appeared in the 1970s. And I remember it because, if I remember correctly, it ...
13
votes
4answers
5k views

What is the correct usage of “while” and “whilst”?

When should whilst be used instead of while? For example, should I use the first or the second sentence? They don't do this whilst they do that. They don't do this while they do that. What ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Can you use “perhaps” at the beginning of a sentence and omit the verb?

For example: More students are emerging with A grades in A level exams. Perhaps as a result of sheer hard work and competition. More students are emerging with A grades in A level exams. This is ...
-2
votes
0answers
43 views

One word to describe a situation where two people have their first and last meeting in the same place

There are two people who had their first date in a place. Six years later, they'll be meeting in that particular place for the last time because one of them is going to die. In the six year time ...
1
vote
2answers
40 views

Whats another word for someone perceptive?

Whats another word to describe someone who can pick up on things quickly?
4
votes
4answers
14k views

“Excel at something” vs. “excel in something”

I've come across a question while writing an exam Roger really excelled ___ sports A) at B) on C) in D) for My first thought was 'in', later I remembered using 'at' also. I've ...
0
votes
1answer
772 views

“Much as” vs “Much like”

"Much as they had done with her..." "Much like they had done with her..." I was told that the use of "much like" in the second sentence is grammatically wrong. Any explanation is greatly ...
3
votes
1answer
213 views

A word that describes different forms of the same word?

Is there a word that describes the many different forms of a root word (and I don't mean tense). In this example specifically the root word would be compare...and the form of it is comparatively. But ...
13
votes
10answers
37k views

Is “bolded” a word?

Is bolded a word? I just bolded the important text in this sentence.
0
votes
1answer
97 views

Common word for two people who want to meet but are not acquaintances

I'm looking for a word to describe two people (instructor and student), who are trying to find time to met each other. Preferably one or two word expression.
0
votes
2answers
85 views

What's a word to describe someone who thinks quick?

A word to describe someone's personality trait that think quick. For example he gets lost in the woods then comes up with a solution on the fly to find his way back home.
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Word “Purchase” in SAAS Subscription Model

In a subscription model, the user is not purchasing the application, they just subscribe and pay based on the billing cycle. So, I've a doubt whether can we use the word 'Purchase'.
9
votes
4answers
9k views

“Though” vs. “although”

Can we use though and although interchangeably? Somebody told me that the difference is that though cannot be used at the beginning of a sentence. Is that the rule?
1
vote
4answers
67 views

What is the antonym of “isolated” in the context of chemical substance?

I am looking for a word which would mean "not an isolated substance". I would use "blend" or "mixture", but these would imply that the components where isolated in the first place and then blended ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

To prolong vs to protract

What is the difference between the words to prolong and to protract? Can we replace the words with each other without losing their meanings in the following sentences? To protract means: Prolong: ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

The difference between remnant, vestige, remains,ruin and trace [on hold]

what are differences between the words remnant, vestige, remains,ruin and trace in a historical sense? A trace or remnant of something that is disappearing or no longer exists ...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

What's the opposite of bonus?

According to this, the antonym would be Malus. But is there a more widely used term? Consider an exam where you've got a "Bonus question", so solving it correctly gives you an extra point. Would it ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

to emanate from vs to stem from

Are the words to emanate from and to stem from synonym in the following sense? Do you think I can swap with each other without changing the meaning of the following sentences ? 1 (Of a feeling, ...
31
votes
9answers
28k views

“Trainer” is to “trainee” as “mentor” is to what?

What do you call someone who is being mentored? Is it mentoree or mentee? Does the term student or pupil imply a context outside the business environment?
0
votes
0answers
11 views

'There's nothing to match tea as a refreshing drink.' [migrated]

I'm doing a grammar exercise and I have to complete the sentence underneath A cup of tea is the most refreshing drink of all. There's.................as a refreshing drink. The given word is ...
7
votes
4answers
13k views

“Register” vs. “registry”

What's the difference in meaning between “register” and “registry”? Can both be used interchangeably when talking about an official (public) list of items, records?
0
votes
2answers
80 views

Difference between 'to seem' and 'to appear'

Is there a difference between the sentences "The general case seems to be open." and "The general case appears to be open." ? Or are they interchangeable?
-1
votes
4answers
55 views
5
votes
6answers
4k views

Do Americans use the term “garburator” or is there a better equivalent?

Is it obsolete to use the term garburator to refer to a garbage disposal unit in a kitchen? If it is, do we have a better term to replace it with? Also, what is the etymology of this word?
21
votes
6answers
3k views

What is the name of the symbols “<” and “>”?

I know that ^ is called a caret, but this doesn't seem to apply to the similarly shaped but nonetheless different < and > symbols. The only names I've heard them called is the less-than sign and ...
0
votes
3answers
51 views

Are “prototypical” and “prototypal” different?

I typed prototypal inheritance and got a wavy red underline conveying a alternative word for the same from Google. I am getting the same underline while typing this post. The suggestion is ...
-1
votes
0answers
24 views

Control, control and manage, management difference

What is the difference between control and m­anage? Some context below:­ I can control/manage it.­ I keep it under control/management.­ It is a subject of control/managment.­ These phrases could ...
-1
votes
0answers
36 views

The differences between being crafty, cunning, conman and sly

What are the differences between being crafty, cunning, conman and sly in terms of meaning and usage ?
27
votes
9answers
71k views

Is “errored” correct usage?

If "errored" is not a valid word, then how should I say: The program errored at line 44 I guess I could say: The program threw an error at line 44 But why is "errored" wrong? Is there a ...
10
votes
6answers
1k views

How to concisely handle words that don't have an antonym

I work in software for a living, and have had a problem recently with the language I use to describe software components. This profession increasingly reveals itself to need the skill to accurately ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

“Then this” vs “Then that” [duplicate]

I have the following paragraph: We often write hundreds of lines of code to express simple concepts. This code takes time to develop and maintain - and if you’re writing tests, then that time ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Usage of “diary” and “calendar”

The difference between a paper diary and a paper calendar is fairly clear, though either may be used to record an appointmemt. However a computer application is less clear as, for example, MS ...
1
vote
2answers
52 views

Is there a word for it?

I would like to use a word or phrase to describe a situation where one has a goal in mind and access to all the resources(Connections, Money, Knowledge) but isn't working hard to achieve its goals. ...
0
votes
1answer
115 views

Is “in assistance with” correct?

I have drafted a letter containing the statement: In assistance with the team, the company registered sales amounting to $x in 2014-15 Is "In assistance with the team" a correct use of ...
35
votes
14answers
6k views

Is there a word or an idiom for people who only spend their families' money and fool around?

Is there a word or an idiom for rich people who spend only their families' money and do not bother to work, just fool around?
1
vote
1answer
63 views

melancholically or melancholic

In the example below, should I use melancholically or melancholic? Are either fine to use? "the music begins playing melancholically/melancholic over the dancefloor." Thanks for any input, much ...
1
vote
2answers
52 views

How can I say this in other words? [on hold]

Recently I took a personality test and got some good results. However, there was a part of the full description that I didn't understand. I'd like to know how I can say this text in other words, must ...
0
votes
5answers
114 views

How to say thank you for someone tried but could not help me?

Today someone tried to help me to find something but failed, so I said "thank you anyway" to her in the end. Is "thank you anyway" appropriate in this situation? And what phrase should I use to ...
0
votes
2answers
120 views

“Deliver using/with/by the certificate”

In the fragment "to complete and deliver construction works to the customer using the Certificate of Work Completion", how can I change the word using (in the sense of "by what means")? Should I ...
1
vote
2answers
50 views

Is there a name for dismissing an argument because of lack of immediate examples?

I've often found myself subject to this tactic, where someone will present an argument in support of a particular outcome, and then dismiss any criticism of it because the critique fails to solicit ...
3
votes
9answers
475 views

Is there a term for discrimination without negative connotation?

The word "discrimination" carries in itself a negative connotation, implying that it would be unfair or unethical. There are however, cases where "discrimination" would be justified and no one in ...
2
votes
4answers
10k views

“By clicking submit you agree…” or “By clicking submit you are agreeing…”

By clicking submit you agree to the Terms and Conditions. By clicking submit you are agreeing to the Terms and Conditions. Which is correct? Why?