This tag is for questions about choosing the best word for a particular context or meaning.

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1
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1answer
18 views

Is “join” in this context ambiguous?

During this internship, I joined the on-line training program which was given by the company to the employees and aimed to help them grasp the new system. I am the student of this program. I am ...
0
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5answers
38 views

How to describe these abstract concepts?

I am aware that to do this one needs not only professional skills in technologies, a sound knowledge in education and methodologies, but also a deep understanding and comprehensive analysis of ...
13
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4answers
1k views

What do you call someone who obsessively thinks they are sick?

Googling relevant terms such as sick, self, conception, and mixing them gave me nothing useful. So, is there any term in English, either in common sense of the word or technical sense, to refer to ...
2
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7answers
321 views

Other ways to define a turning point

After a difficult childhood, the encounter with Rev. Charles, was a turning point in his life. What other expressions can be used to to define the concept of turning point?
0
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1answer
90 views

Use of the word “definitive edition”

Can I use the phrase "definitive edition" to explain that a product has the most up-to-date and highest quality in the field as opposite to mean "last edition of the same series"? Thank you for your ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Is there a name for a war where everyone fights everyone else?

Is there a name for a war where everyone fights everyone else? I think that I heard the name "Kephyr" (Turkish? for the name of a war where it's all against all but I could not verify it.
1
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1answer
16 views

Can "field“ used in this sentence?

They succeed in persuading me to leave the field of technology in which I can easily find assurance in terms of job opportunity and financial stability. Please tell me whether I can use the word ...
2
votes
2answers
42 views

Conspicuous v. Ostentatious

Conspicuous means: 1. Easy to notice; obvious: a conspicuous flaw in the construction. 2. Attracting attention, as by being unusual or remarkable; noticeable. Ostentatious means: characterized by ...
0
votes
3answers
31 views

Word Request: A word that would describe how seconds (or other unit) relate to minutes (or other unit)

For example, if I had the sentence: A minutes ______ are seconds. What word would work here? It would also fit in the sentences below. A byte's _____ are bits. A byte is split up by eight ______ ...
3
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3answers
53 views

The state of being a vagabond

I'm looking for an English word that describes the state of being a vagabond, and can be used in a sentence like this: "My only goal is vagabond-age" (to coin a word). More details: I'm trying ...
21
votes
14answers
2k views

A word for: someone who is easy to talk to

I want to convey the idea that such and such person is very easy to talk to. I know that: 'talk to-able' is not a word, obviously. I can always say, "He is very easy to talk to." But I am looking ...
-1
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2answers
23 views

which adjective should i use for family of someone

I want to write a happy new year letter for someone(not very close, business partner) what adjective should i use in regard to his family for example : Dear Family , respectful family , beloved family ...
0
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4answers
61 views

Word for Inability to Write

When school's off for more than three or four days, I usually don't write much (I prefer to type at home!) and so when I come back and hold my pen[cil], my fingers refuse to move like they normally ...
13
votes
6answers
2k views

Antonym for “discombobulate”

I'm looking for a good antonym to discombobulate. I'm aware that the word is made-up American slang and as such there is no such thing as to be combobulated. If a person is anything but ...
23
votes
9answers
6k views
+150

Do the words “jail” and “prison” refer to different things?

In everyday speech, the terms jail and prison are used interchangeably in many situations. However, my understanding is that, at least in the US, they actually refer to slightly different things. For ...
1
vote
3answers
40 views

A word for 'scared' in this context

My cousin is really bad at math. Whenever she looks at a math book, she runs away. She is 'scared' of math. I know this is not the correct word to use. Can someone please give me a word that means ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

“Whenever I was” vs “Whenever I got”?

Is there any notable difference between the two? Example: Whenever I was depressed, sounds would amplify themselves ten or twenty times, to the point they became indistinguishable from physical ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

Is magnanimity the right word for courage, insight and willingness to overlook or forgive?

Definitions of magnanimous in some of the most authoritative dictionaries: Oxford Dictionaries Online: Generous or forgiving, especially towards a rival or less powerful person. Dictionary.com ...
9
votes
2answers
3k views

When to use 'an' and when to use 'a' with words begining with 'h'?

Some h-words need 'an' for the indefinite article (I will be there in an hour). Other h-words need 'a' for the indefinite article (It is a history of sadness). Is there a general rule?
0
votes
2answers
66 views

Do the following three expressions have the same meaning?

My flight is scheduled for 7 p.m. from New York. My flight is scheduled for New York at 7 p.m. My flight is scheduled for New York, 7 p.m.
1
vote
1answer
113 views

“What I'm looking for is/are [plural noun]”

Which one of the below is correct, and if both are correct in certain contexts, which is the preferred one? What I'm looking for is methods that help... What I'm looking for are the methods ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views
9
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6answers
2k views

Is it absolutely necessary to use “than” over “then” in a comparison?

Do you think you are smarter then me? While this question should be using than...I have to wonder if this is a debatable topic within English or is this cut and dry? If this specific instance is ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

“As on 16 May” vs. “as of 16 May” — which is correct?

I updated a cost sheet and I want to specify that it's a newly updated cost sheet. For this situation, which one is correct? cost sheet as on/of 16 May Before specifying a date, which will come ...
2
votes
3answers
340 views

Is majoritively a word?

So I was writing a sentence and the word majoritively popped into my head as a "Hey, why not? Sounds good!" type of word. My sentence was to the effect of: Our GridViews majoritively use classic ...
0
votes
4answers
182 views

Noun for the desire to sleep?

I have had this thought on many sleepless nights: is there a word specifically for the desire to go to sleep? Not in the sense of being sleepy or tired, but actively wanting to become asleep. If a ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

Adjective describing a person who does work to get it done

I have a friend who always goes on that I have a bad work ethic, though I am not lazy. At the same time, he says he has a good work ethic, but is lazy. The definition of having a good work ethic is ...
4
votes
1answer
45 views

Can the word mnemonic be used adverbally?

A mnemonic is a memory device for reducing something diverse and complicated to an easily -remembered pattern. For example, for the order of planets in the solar system, I learned as a boy the ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

how can I use “fewer” and “more” with numbers?

I have never heard anyone use words "fewer" and "more" when talking about the fact that a certain number of items is greater than a certain number of other items by a constant. For example if the ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

Would the slang version, yessir, of yes, sir, be deemed as derogatory, offensive, or simply disrespectful to someone your senior?

I use yessir as a slang form of yes, sir all the time. Is it even a word? Would the slang version, yessir, be deemed as derogatory, offensive, or simply disrespectful to someone your senior?
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Descry, Espy, Spot, Spy

I know as a general rule that no two words are identical in meaning and use. I was wondering if I could get help in understanding the different meanings and uses of descry, espy, spot and spy. I know ...
1
vote
5answers
90 views

Single word for “Young of an animal”

In a conversation today I needed a word for "Young of an animal". Not animal-specific like "puppy" or "kitten". The conversation went like this: Me: 2 kittens to be precise! Person: Kittens are ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

What is better word to 'defaulter' describing a person who did not follow a process? [closed]

In office everyone needs to fill their time logs, failing to person receives the email. The manager refers to person(s) as defaulter. Is there any other word which can be used here ? (I believe its a ...
3
votes
4answers
975 views

What is the difference between 'try' and 'attempt' when used as nouns?

Why is it possible to say The speech is an attempt to pacify all parties concerned. but not *"The speech is a try to ...." Although they are interchangeable in I will give it another ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Is it acceptable to use exiguous in such a way as this? Which of these is a better alternative to referring to one as stupid?

I am attempting to formulate a phrase that is an exceptional alternative to the banal "stupid". I have found some good contestants, but I feel that exiguous, if I am using it correctly, will fit the ...
0
votes
2answers
44 views

Do you assign a person to a task or a task to a person [on hold]

In a web application the system should generate summary reports. Which is natural to say? When an assignment is done: Ted assigned Mary to task 33. or Ted assigned task 33 to Mary. If ...
6
votes
6answers
544 views

A word for weariness after travelling?

Is there a word meaning something along the lines of weary, haggard or generally not at one's best after a long journey? Something like travel-worn, but better? As a compelling motivating example, I ...
3
votes
1answer
44 views

Is the infinitive in this sentence correct?

John was fortunate to receive the funding. The statement uses the infinitive "to receive" instead of "to have received," which describes the state of having received something. "to have received" ...
1
vote
2answers
57 views

Difference between “aunt to” and “aunt of”

E.g. You are going to be aunt to my son. You're going to be aunt of my son.
23
votes
19answers
3k views

What do you call a response which does not address the question?

When some one is asked a question, sometimes if they are trying to avoid answering the question, they respond with something unrelated. What is the word for that response? Eg. A: Why were you late? ...
1
vote
4answers
78 views

Word to describe a person who has a lot of experience in a specific field

I'm looking for a word to describe a person who has significant experience in a particular field (for example, an artist who has worked in the music industry for more than 10 years). There are some ...
5
votes
9answers
298 views

What is the idiom or expression to describe the state that a person interrupts their happy time by believing that “this will end soon “?

There are some people who don't enjoy the available good time and sometimes it even worries them. I am not sure why, but they might think that they will miss those moment and suffer for the lack of ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Can “existing” ever refer to past existence?

It included a better warranty than John's existing one, which was exactly what John needed. Can existing/current refer to the warranty at the time in the past? It needs to express the idea that ...
4
votes
2answers
75 views

Difference between “abate” and “bate”

What is the difference between abate and bate? How are they used differently? Do they both mean the same thing? (from the Free Dictionary) The definition of abate is 'to reduce in amount, degree, or ...
1
vote
2answers
41 views

Something like antonym for “dependent”

Let's suppose I have two objects – A and B. Their are in pair. I mean that we will give name to them considering their as one logic unit. For example: if I call A as "driven", then B will be called ...
0
votes
1answer
152 views

Christmas wishes to multiple persons [on hold]

I'm sending an email to Alice (person A) and I cc Bob (person B). The email begins with Dear Alice, [Text] Wishing you Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! Regards Jim ...
1
vote
3answers
69 views

Why do cricket and baseball each use the term 'pitch' but in different senses?

I should say from the outset that I do know the answer to this question, because I have just researched it. But it is so interesting that I felt it was worth an airing. I am not clear if it is ...
1
vote
3answers
54 views

Is there a literary or scholarly synonym for an 'origin story' or myth?

I am trying to remember a word I learned in high school that meant "a story that explains why something is the way it is." It's not origin story or creation myth, but rather one word probably with a ...
0
votes
0answers
57 views

What is a 'correct' term for Mongoloid features? [closed]

I am not referring here to any illness, which may once have been called Mongoloid. I am referring to the general facial features of people of East Asia, Central Asia, Eastern Russia, and South-East ...
3
votes
5answers
193 views

Is there a term or word for solving a problem that oneself created?

I am looking for a word or term for the concept of solving a problem that oneself created. An example would be a solution to smog. If there wasn't so much emission and pollution, there would be no ...