This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning.

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8
votes
2answers
591 views

How should one address a police officer in the US? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct form of address for a police officer? What is the correct way to address a police officer in the US in a non-emergency situation (such as asking ...
14
votes
6answers
8k views

What is the correct form of address for a police officer?

How should one address a police officer in English speaking countries? More specifically, in a non-emergency situation—asking directions for example—what is the expected form of address used to call a ...
0
votes
6answers
203 views

How to say that a city is in the side of another city? Is it neighborhood city?

I live in Guarulhos city, which is right next to the city of São Paulo. Can I say that Guarulhos is the neighbor of São Paulo?
3
votes
1answer
868 views

Describing a well-respected person who is welcomed in a foreign country

Is there an English term to describe someone who is welcomed with high respect in a country, for example, the Chinese vice president on a recent trip to the US?
1
vote
4answers
473 views

“having”, “with” or “who have” - which is preferred for an attribute conferring group membership? [closed]

I need to provide a label in my software's user interface that describes about the list of members having private access to a document. So which one will suit best from the following? Members having ...
9
votes
9answers
8k views

Can I say 'co-student'?

I want to refer to a member of our lab, who is working with me on the same project, and I was wondering what would be the best term to use. We are both mainly students, but we also work as Research ...
3
votes
4answers
305 views

What does “raising the debt ceiling is not groovy” mean? Is the word “groovy" obsolete among the youth of America”?

In Japan, the word groovy has been used to mean "fashionable and trendy" as an imported English word, which I think, doesn’t go far from the definition, "fashionable, attractive and interesting" in ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Past-tense of “concept”

What is the past tense word of the word concept? In MS Outlook, I used this sentence and it's complaining to me. The peer tool was initially concepted in 2006 for Dr. T.
19
votes
7answers
2k views

Is “penultimate” commonly used? [closed]

Is penultimate commonly used in English, or are its variations (such as second to last) more common? I need to use it in conjunction with the expressions First Payment Date and Last Payment Date to ...
1
vote
6answers
1k views

“Right” and “Left” and “Top” and “Bottom”

We normally say to my right and to my left. If something is located to my top or bottom how would I say that? Say, I am lying on the floor, to my right there is a wall, to my left there is a desk* ...
4
votes
7answers
17k views

“Rebellion” vs. “revolution”

What is the difference between rebellion and revolution? These two words seem almost the same, except that rebellion is generally more distasteful. Dictionary.com lists definitions of rebellion: ...
3
votes
2answers
294 views

What do you call the 'intro document' that new employees get on their first day?

I'm referring to the "master plan document" of how they'll learn all they need to learn in order to start working at company X. Often this is a mega tome of links and sub-links, or lists of lists, ...
3
votes
2answers
740 views

Another word for “apply”?

I'm in the middle of creating a web form, where users can apply for a certain service. In order to do so, they are clicking the apply button. Then they fill out a form and submit it. Later on, they ...
11
votes
2answers
302 views

What's the most pedantically correct way to reference sectioned and numbered rules aloud?

I am a roller derby announcer. An important part of my job is to explain the rules of roller derby to the fans. The rules of modern roller derby are promulgated by the Women's Flat Track Derby ...
13
votes
7answers
626 views

What is the appropriate word for “following trail” or similar in English?

In this scenario, suppose someone gives me a down vote, for whatever reason. After that someone else comes and sees the down vote and thinks this should be down voted. Another down vote. Another ...
6
votes
3answers
19k views

“In the next two weeks” vs. “next two weeks”

Which one of the following is correct if the writer intends to say a week after next week? My friend and I decided to go to the beach in the next two weeks. My friend and I decided to go to ...
3
votes
4answers
327 views

What is the word or term for the item being parodied?

I'm writing a paper about a book that is a parody of another work. Is there a word, similar to debtee to debtor, that will work in this situation? Specifically, Lord of the Flies (Golding, 1954) as ...
7
votes
7answers
10k views

Is there a word for the extreme opposite of “irony”

My understanding of irony comes from the movie "Reality Bites": It's when the actual meaning is the complete opposite from the literal meaning Frequently people use the term incorrectly, ...
3
votes
2answers
53k views

When do you use “talked” and “spoke”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the difference between “speaking” and “talking”? I'm often befuddled when I am reading an article and the author uses talked with when ...
2
votes
3answers
68 views

I can see us agreeing on many points “in the article” or “from the article”?

I want to provide a reader with a link to an article and say that we would agree on a lot of points therein. What's the best way to state that and which one in the below versions is correct? I can ...
4
votes
4answers
29k views

“Based on” vs. “based upon”

Should I use on or upon in the following sentence? I remembered the story years later when I investigated the incident it was based on.
2
votes
7answers
4k views

The word describing being in a steady & boring situation for long time [closed]

What word describes the situation where you have to stay in a boring condition for a long time? For example when a doctor tells you you have to stay in bed for two days without leaving it at all! The ...
2
votes
5answers
1k views

“Except for” vs “Except In”

What is the difference between the following two? We didn't have a chance to meet, except for the campaign. We didn't have a chance to meet, except in the campaign [or "except for in the ...
2
votes
5answers
433 views

How to describe “working steadily and slowly is treated as stubborn”

It is not uncommon that those who prefer to work or learn in a solid and therefore usually slow way are being called as stubborn, and those in a fast-pacing but non-solid way as smart. I wonder how ...
8
votes
3answers
599 views

Non-pejorative term for 'alcohol aficionado'?

Is there a non-pejorative term analogous to "foodie" but in the context of alcoholic drinks? Everything that comes to mind suggests some form of alcoholism or affinity for binge-drinking. More ...
7
votes
1answer
477 views

What is the correct use of “safety” and “security”?

I was chatting with three friends this evening, when one of them asked about the use of some english words (we are not native speakers): What is the difference between "security" and "safety"? ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Is it correct to use the preposition “by” interchangeably with “near”?

Is it correct to use the preposition by interchangeably with near? I went to the store near me. I went to the store nearby me. I went to the store by me. Are the above sentences all correct? ...
5
votes
4answers
3k views

Alternative of “unvalidated”

Given something in a state of not having been validated or invalidated, its validness is, as yet, unknown. Can it be said to be unvalidated? If not, what is the proper term?
7
votes
5answers
6k views

Is the phrase 'according to me' correct?

Is the saying "According to me" correct? I believe it's incorrect, and that "In my opinion" is better. Can anyone clarify?
2
votes
3answers
932 views

How to denote a larger distance

Suppose I have some measurement with interferometer number 1, let's call the result A, and another measurement with interferometer number 2, let's call that one B. Suppose that always A>B (in some ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

“Clicking the button saves… ” vs. “clicking the button will save…”

I wish to describe just what gets saved when the user clicks the 'Save' button on a web page. Should I write "Clicking the Save button saves all changes" or "Clicking the the Save button will save all ...
4
votes
4answers
29k views

“Naïve” vs “Ignorant”

What is the difference between naïve and ignorant? I want to make sure I understand the proper meaning and connotation of each word. For example, how would you describe a person who makes ...
2
votes
9answers
1k views

a word/couple to express eagerness to win

Winning is a thing that is supposed to happen during an event. Before the event, of course, there are many competitors eager to win. I need a nice word or phrase to express eagerness to win — but ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

What word describes what to do when you have run out of credit on the phone? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I have no money on my cell phone account” or “my cellphone is out of money” or how? What do I need to do, when I have run out of credit for my ...
4
votes
5answers
752 views

“Group” vs. “community” usage

Question 1 When we have a certain number of people that share the same interest, do we refer to them as: interest group or community [sharing same interest]? What would be preferred and more ...
2
votes
5answers
1k views

Task, project, assignment, job. Which one is correct in my case?

I have a tiny table/bulletin board to display information for all members to remind them of their deadline task. They work for one large project, each is assigned to code for a specific thing. Which ...
2
votes
3answers
883 views

What is the best word for “brain drain” within a company?

I'm writing a proposal for work. For it, I would like a word that describes the concept of brain drain - lots of people leaving the country and taking their knowledge with them - but that is limited ...
47
votes
10answers
26k views

You quench your thirst. What do you do with your hunger?

What is the equivalent of "quench" when speaking of hunger? Is it appropriate to say you quenched your hunger?
4
votes
2answers
379 views

A word for passing through a tollgate, turnpike, etc

I'm looking for a noun that describes a car passing through a tollgate; it's this event I'm trying to name. A person going through a turnpike might be similar, I guess. Possible use of word would be ...
1
vote
5answers
6k views

A word or phrase to say something reminds or hints or brings up another idea

I want to tell that something reminds/hint us of another thing. For example, in an application, a sorting method used in it has similarities to bubble sort but not completely the same. In this case, ...
0
votes
1answer
912 views

What's different between “sophisticated” and “intricate”? [closed]

I know this is probably a very simple question, but it seems to me that I see "sophisticated" more in specialized books, and "intricate" more in non-specialized books. What's the difference?
1
vote
1answer
119 views

“Product by company” or “product from company”

Suppose that there is a company named Megasoft. Megasoft has just launched their new software application to the public called Softronic. Which is correct: Softronic by Megasoft or Softronic from ...
1
vote
3answers
557 views

Is “To proceed setting up your website, click here” a proper sentence?

Is the following sentence grammatical? To proceed setting up your account, click here. I'm suspicious of the word proceed in this context — isn't the word continue a much better fit?
3
votes
2answers
8k views

What could we call a person with deep knowledge in various fields? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Differences among words describing someone who is expert in many things I just wondered, what could we call a person with deep knowledge in various fields? For example, ...
7
votes
3answers
502 views

Is there a specific name for the line commonly drawn under arithmetic problems?

Basic problems are often written as:  3 -2 --      <-- Is there a name for this? 1
5
votes
2answers
1k views

How acceptable is “fully fledged” as opposed to “full-fledged”?

As a native speaker of English, I had never heard the "fully" version until recently. Now I seem to hear it a lot, but only from non-native speakers. Are the two equally acceptable in semi-formal ...
7
votes
6answers
9k views

Is there an alternative, one-word name for the question mark?

Is there an alternative name for the question mark? For example, the exclamation point is often called a bang, the number symbol is called a pound sign or sharp symbol and the asterisk symbol is ...
4
votes
3answers
26k views

“Most importantly” or “more importantly”?

Which of the following two sentences is more correct? "A picture says a thousand words, more importantly in a fraction of a second" OR "A picture says a thousand words, most importantly in a ...
5
votes
5answers
30k views

“Improvement in/on/of/to something”

What is the correct preposition to use after improvement? For example, The successful candidate is expected to contribute with an improvement of the current calibration.
2
votes
5answers
15k views

“Old days” or “olden days”?

Sometimes I use the phrase "back in the old days". I was recently in a class where the trainer kept using the phrase "olden days." Which usage is acceptable?