This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning. The selection to choose from will appear in the question.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

0
votes
2answers
653 views

Noun for adjective “neat”

I need a noun for an adjective "neat" (or "cool") in the slang meaning "terrific". My logic tells me to use "neatness", but dictionaries don't seem to list the slang meaning for it. I don't mind any ...
0
votes
3answers
422 views

Is it right using this expression “I am there at home”?

I realized that I use expressions like this a lot, I am there at home. instead of I am at home. Is it right? And if so then what is the difference between the two? The word "there" in ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

The correct use of “sundering”

I'm writing a book in which one of the major events is a day that separates two major forces in the world. It's meant to be a punishment from a high power, so at first I wanted to call it The Day of ...
-2
votes
2answers
227 views

“I need to wash my hands bad[ly]” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I feel bad for you” versus “I feel badly for you” I'm terrible at the usage of bad vs. badly. Given the sentence: I need to wash my hands bad[ly]. Should the ...
6
votes
2answers
9k views

What's the word for the “back arm” if there is one?

We have the word "forearm" — but what's the other half of the arm called by itself? Does it have a corresponding positional name?
1
vote
3answers
2k views

“Encapsulated by” vs. “encapsulated in” vs. “encapsulated with”

I am writing some text wherein I have to mean "wrapped with double quotes". Would any of the following expressions be correct? encapsulated with double quotes encapsulated in double quotes ...
0
votes
1answer
221 views

“So much ahead of” vs. “so much forward of”

Let's say I'm a pitcher in a baseball game, standing on the pitcher's mound which is supposed to be 100m away from the batsman. Someone messes up the mound and moves it 50 m further, making it ...
1
vote
2answers
9k views

Should a company be referred to as “he/she” or as “it”?

When a customer represents a company, not a person, and a pronoun is needed to refer back to that customer, should one use he/she, or should one use it?
4
votes
8answers
24k views

What adjective describes somebody who is quiet and obeys all the rules?

What adjective describes somebody who is quiet and obeys all the rules? For example, "Xiaoli is a very (adj.) student because she doesn't smoke or drink, gets good grades, and always does her ...
8
votes
8answers
12k views

What's the word that describes this ability/quality?

What is the word that describes someone who displays the ability to think of alternative ways of dealing with a situation, especially a situation that calls for it and then acts upon it? In my native ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

The sound of a moving tree trunk

When it's windy out as the wind is blown against a large standing tree, its trunk moves and makes a noise similar to that creaking noise that a door or a floorboard in a house makes. Do we use creak ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

“Precise” vs. “exact” [closed]

Which of the sentences below looks more natural? Question answering systems that appear with the aim of providing precise textual answers. Question answering systems that appear with the aim ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

“Work” vs. “working” (noun)

What are the differences between work and working when used as nouns? For example: Advocates claim that work/working brings a lot of benefits for young people. Which one is correct? I have ...
2
votes
1answer
609 views

Why do “consulting engineers” advise, not consult?

I am interested to find if the two terms consulting and advising are interchangeable, particularly in business. Generally, one consults someone else, who advises. That is, the seeker of information ...
3
votes
1answer
622 views

“We have” vs. “we have that” [closed]

In a mathematical context, which of the following options is more appropriate? Since the fact A is true, we have B=C. Since the fact A is true, we have that B=C.
7
votes
3answers
5k views

Froth, foam, lather or suds?

I know this topic is unlikely to pique any native speaker's curiosity, but bear with me, I am trying to learn the difference between froth, foam, lather and suds. I feel these terms are not always ...
-4
votes
0answers
70 views

“can I speak to Mr Tom” or “May I speak to Mr Tom” which one is correct [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can/May/Will you help me with this? Difference between “can” and “may” Can I speak to Mr Tom? May I speak to Mr Tom? Which one is correct? My thinking is ...
-1
votes
0answers
37 views

I appreciate your (advice / advise)? [closed]

Which sentence is much better? I appreciate any advice given. I appreciate any advise given. or are there better word to fill in the blank? I appreciate any ____ given.
0
votes
1answer
308 views

Is “low physique” idiomatic?

Is "low physique" idiomatic? If not, what is the adjective to be used with physique?
2
votes
2answers
10k views

“As on 16 May” vs. “as of 16 May” — which is correct?

I updated a cost sheet and I want to specify that it's a newly updated cost sheet. For this situation, which one is correct? cost sheet as on/of 16 May Before specifying a date, which will come ...
20
votes
11answers
108k views

“The point is moot”

I was recently called out for using the phrase "the point is moot" incorrectly. My intent was to indicate that I felt that the point wasn't really worth debating or discussing. I was then shown that ...
2
votes
4answers
215 views

Is “the changes you intend to make will not do us any good” polite?

I would like a polite (formal) way to say: The changes you intend to make will not do us any good. or should I say "intend on making"?
7
votes
2answers
10k views

“Favored” vs. “favorited”

We're making a website in which users can mark some objects as objects they like. Since we're not native English speakers here, a dispute evolved around what's the correct way to call this user-object ...
2
votes
2answers
10k views

“Difficulty of” vs. “difficulty in”

In the sentence: I understand the difficulty of remaining objective. Should it be as is, or should it be like this: I understand the difficulty in remaining objective.
1
vote
2answers
14k views

Is the phrase “… or I'm mistaken” correct?

I want to write phrase "Capital of A is B, or I'm mistaken?", but I'm not sure that the second part of thus phrase is correct. Should I write "... or I've made a mistake?", or "... or I'm wrong?"? ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

How to describe strength of keeping things simple and beautiful

I'm writing performance review of one of my colleagues that includes describing his strengths. For example, one of his strengths is Communication. He can quickly resolve conflicts with co-workers, ...
0
votes
1answer
229 views

What is the right way of asking questions?

This is a follow-up question to this question that I asked yesterday. There are a couple of similar expressions that I need help with: How [am I supposed to/do I] get to the stadium from ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Which of “couldn't”, “can't”, and “doesn't” for 13/13/13?

I recently came across an English learner saying that 12/12/12 is the last time such a repetition of day/month/year (or month/day/year, or year/month/day) will occur in the Gregorian calendar for a ...
1
vote
4answers
6k views

“Particulate” vs. “particle”

What’s the difference between particulate and particle? Should it be diesel particulates or diesel particles, and why? Could you provide three or more examples where it should use particulate rather ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

“Consists of” vs. “consists in”: different meanings of the verb, or the same meaning applied differently?

Mark Twain said, Good breeding consists in concealing how much we think of ourselves and how little we think of the other person. Could he have used consists of there instead of consists in and ...
-1
votes
1answer
3k views

“Place the television on/in the left corner and sofa set at/in the right corner”

One question came in my exam: We've decided to place the television on/in the left corner and sofa set at/in the right corner of the room. For non-livings there should be a common preposition. ...
18
votes
5answers
12k views

Font/Fount of Information?

I have seen it both ways: He is a veritable font of information. He is a veritable fount of information. The first is referenced by M-W's definition and seems to match the pronunciation I'm ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Phrase help for do's and don'ts

While I am writing some health tips, I used a phrase do's and don'ts, in describing my activities. I wonder, if there is any equivalent word to do's and don'ts. I believe this phrase is archaic. Are ...
4
votes
5answers
36k views

”Demand in/on/for something”

I am not sure whether to use in, on, or for after the word demand in the following sentence: The continuing demand on high-quality software that is reusable and easy to maintain and modify after ...
1
vote
5answers
8k views

Letter closing other than “Love”

I am writing an email to a family member (in-law or brother/sister). While in the past I used "love" and signed off with my first name for closing, I usually wondered if there are better words I could ...
6
votes
3answers
7k views

“Start” vs. “begin”, “finish” vs. “end”

I am not a native speaker and I have came up with a problem of using start vs. beginning. Which one is more proper to indicate a date (year)? For example: The year in which physiotherapy ...
-1
votes
5answers
121 views

Alternative for “seats” in expressions such as “40% of the total seats are reserved for students of backward cast”

All of the leading educational institutes have 60% of their seats reserved for students of backward castes. It is a fairly common expression and a sad fact in India. What would be an alternative to ...
-1
votes
2answers
266 views

“Through” or “From”?

Amy talks about her strong interest in finance developed through her internship in the trust fund. I get confused about the word "through". Would it be appropriate to use it there?
1
vote
1answer
90 views

Referring to the work introducing the idea

When making relations of my contribution to the work of others, I sometimes deliberately want to avoid detailed description of the related work and state: "For details on derivation, see the original ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

What's the difference between “rigor” and “rigorousness”?

What's the difference between rigor and rigorousness? Which should I use in the following? Rigorousness and clarity are not synonymous in pedagogy.
1
vote
3answers
921 views

Sleeping aside me

My friend used this sentence: I wouldn’t be able to sleep at nights if she is sleeping aside me. Is the usage of the word aside correct here? I always thought “sleeping besides me” is the right ...
2
votes
3answers
142 views

“Tipster” in real estate terms

I'm trying to figure out what somebody is called who gives you (or someone else) a tip on real estate brokerage. I've Googled (and Bing'ed ;)) along and found translations like "whistleblower" or ...
0
votes
7answers
763 views

what would you call a guy everybody picks on?

Let's say we have a guy who is stupid and weak and everybody picks on him and mocks him all the time. What would we call this guy? I found timid in the dictionary but I am looking for a colloquial ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

If someone thinks like you, can he or she be your 'alter ego'?

Wikipedia explains alter ego thus: An alter ego (Latin, "the other I") is a second self, which is believed to be distinct from a person's normal or original personality. A person who has an ...
2
votes
4answers
6k views

What is the formal way of saying “You have got something wrong”?

Let's say that I am working with my manager; he made some mistake which I have identified, and I want to point that out to him. So is there any polite way of saying "You have got it wrong."? (By the ...
-1
votes
2answers
71 views

“By overlooking” vs. “with overlooking” [closed]

What the difference is between "by overlooking" and "with overlooking"? Example: It is calculated with/by overlooking variables with low value.
1
vote
1answer
151 views

Retire Vs Retirement

I am confused between the two: My father is due to retire/retirement in a few months and is restless. According to my understanding, retire sounds more appropriate. But I am not sure. Could ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

“justify” vs. “align” in the context of alignment

A function offers an option. The value of the option decides if elements in a column are aligned right, aligned left or centered. Is it OK to call this option justify or is only align correct?
1
vote
3answers
114 views

Is this expression right “he won the Grand Slam in the same season when she won her maiden title”

Basically what I am trying to ask is, can I use expression an expression like ... in the same season when she won the title. instead of ... in the same season she won the title in. I can ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

When to use “it” instead of “who”

In using a title for a particular function of a person (for example, "supplier", "seller", "buyer", "exporter"), is it proper to use the word "it" and "that" and "itself", instead of "he or she" and ...