This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning. The selection to choose from will appear in the question.

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2
votes
2answers
3k views

Is there a word for motion that a bull makes when it kicks back with his legs before charging?

Is there a word for motion that a bull makes when it kicks back with his legs before charging? Kind of like at 22s in the following video http://youtu.be/pjM_67aOT3Y?t=22s Even if it's not an ...
2
votes
1answer
8k views

Could I address someone by first name in business emails if he/she addresses me by first name?

I am really not sure about when it is appropriate to use someone's first name in business emails. If someone addresses me by my first name, but signs his email officially — full name, plus title, ...
3
votes
1answer
959 views

What is the most common name for the floor above the ground floor in Canada?

I think the floor above the ground floor, in public buildings, is either called 2nd floor (in which case the ground floor is the first) or 1st floor. This is quite confusing since you need to know the ...
-1
votes
4answers
1k views

What is one word for - endlessly spread in all directions?

What is one word for - endlessly spread in all directions? It may be in context of a forest.
2
votes
5answers
140 views

What do we call one step in a resolution?

Lets say, I have taken a resolution. And there are 5 steps in the process of accomplishing the resolution. Is there a word for each of those steps? A word other than "baby-step", "target", "milestone"?...
1
vote
1answer
183 views

Which pronoun should be used to refer back to actions?

Which word is better suited to reference an action? For example, Setting appearance of each report component is too long process. It’s easier to use styles for it. or Setting appearance of ...
2
votes
2answers
497 views

Referring to people from different parts of United Kingdom

I see four people in front of me. One is from Wales, one is from Scotland, one is from England and one is from Northern Ireland. I can say about each one "He is Scottish/Welsh/English". But, how do I ...
13
votes
7answers
5k views

What do you call an indoor water tap?

I always thought water sources were called taps in kitchens, bathrooms etc, but a Google search only returned outdoor taps. So my question is, what are indoor taps really called? Like this one: http:/...
0
votes
1answer
422 views

“Quench thirst” vs. “still thirst” when “thirst” is used figuratively

Do I say "quenched my thirst" or "stilled my thirst" when I speak of something that I desire and not actual thirst? E.g. a thirst for a new car or something.
-1
votes
1answer
99 views

“Bridging X and Y” or “bridging X with Y”?

Which is the correct (or more correct) version of this phrase and why? Bridging ancient wisdom with contemporary science Bridging ancient wisdom and contemporary science.
0
votes
1answer
4k views

Looking for a position “with a stable company” or “in a stable company”?

I would like to know which of the following is correct: I am looking for a position of Senior Developer with a stable company. I am looking for a position of Senior Developer in a stable ...
3
votes
3answers
230 views

What tense should be used when looking at an old photo?

Commenting on a photo which was taken a few years back: Question: Is this you? Should I reply: Yes, this is a few years back. or: Yes, this was a few years back. Which of the ...
7
votes
4answers
20k views

“Register” vs. “registry” [closed]

What's the difference in meaning between “register” and “registry”? Can both be used interchangeably when talking about an official (public) list of items, records?
-1
votes
3answers
106 views

“Move slower” vs. “move less”

What is the proper word to fill the blank? The more cars there are on a given road, the __ the traffic will move. The answer is slower. But I wonder whether less is incorrect.
-2
votes
1answer
2k views

“A position in which” vs. “a position where”

Given these two: I’m seeking a position in which I could score many goals. I’m seeking a position where I could score many goals. Which one is better than the other?
2
votes
1answer
367 views

When would I use “once” versus “nonce”?

Looking at the definitions for once and nonce. they appear very similar to me. Under what circumstances would one or the other be a more appropriate word choice?
6
votes
4answers
34k views

“Flammable” versus “Combustible”

In Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition (2003), the first definition of combustible is "capable of combustion," the first definition of combustion is "an act or instance of ...
5
votes
3answers
347 views

Collection of mathematical formulas

What is the correct term for a collection of mathematical formulas in the form of a (small) handbook? I'm looking for a translation of the German noun “Formelsammlung”. Several dictionarys suggest ...
13
votes
5answers
3k views

A word to describe someone who has moved back to live in his/her home country?

If a person was born and brought up in country A, at some point went to live in country B (as an adult) for a few years and then moved back to country A, is there a single word to describe that person'...
7
votes
13answers
3k views

Does English have words to describe the lowest rank member of society? [closed]

For example, in Indonesia we have "rakyat". In English we may have citizen but the word actually has power connotation rather than powerless connotation. Another word is peasant. But that seems to ...
5
votes
4answers
870 views

Is “ass-wise” an acceptable English word? Is it a noun, or adverb?

I was surprised to see the New Yorker’s (February 26) article titled, “Boehner defends decision to remain on ass,” which was chockablock with the word, “Ass.” “Minutes after telling the United ...
5
votes
4answers
18k views

Talking about skills level, which adjective fits better: “intermediate” or “medium”?

I thought "intermediate" was the appropriate label for the second of a three-level system of grading skills level, but I just saw a CV template on which the levels are defined as "basic", "medium", ...
-2
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the difference between “unrelenting” and “relentless”?

Which one do I use for a song that I'm listening in a loop? I asked this on Quora but didn't get a satisfactory clear answer that would justify the difference.
6
votes
5answers
2k views

Looking for the opposite of “drill down”

I am a programmer working on a chart component that allows to drill down on selection of a node. Drilling down will show the details of that node (like its children etc.). But I am struggling to find ...
4
votes
3answers
5k views

Percent or per cent

How should I choose between writing "percent" and "per cent"? For example: He sold 42 percent of his stock in the company. or He sold 42 per cent of his stock in the company. Are there ...
3
votes
1answer
12k views

Do “I guess” and “I would say” have the same meaning?

I often read sentences where the idea is "I would say" but it starts with "I guess". For example: I would say he is not coming. I guess he is not coming. Do both have the same meaning?
3
votes
2answers
180 views

Who is ‘Brad’ who doesn’t want you to succeed in public speaking?

In association with my yesterday’s question about the meaning of ‘metaphysical impossibility’ of the chance of making speech at Oscar Award wining for most of us, I found the following sentence in the ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is this usage of “however” with an adjective correct?

Is the word "however" correctly used in this sentence? If not, how could it be rephrased? This program, however comprehensive, hasn't been updated for a long time. Is there a better construct to ...
-3
votes
2answers
136 views

“Mr. Dill works ________ a big library” [closed]

I'd appreciate a clarification on when it would be best to complete this sentence with "at" and when with "in".
5
votes
3answers
306 views

“This is actually true” vs. [sic]

I often find myself in need of a short expression, to emphasize that what I just wrote (not quoted) is actually true. In cases of paradoxes or illogical truths for instance, like The Monty Hall ...
-2
votes
1answer
310 views

Is there a difference between 'eventually' and 'in the future'? [closed]

I was at a yoga class and the instructor said something about how a posture will 'eventually or in the future allow you to roll your spine out.'. And then I wanted to know, is there a difference ...
2
votes
2answers
288 views

Headline Language

Is there a particular term for the abbreviated language used in headlines (removed of at least articles and conjunctions)?
-1
votes
3answers
5k views

“Be accepted to” vs. “be accepted onto”

Do these variations mean anything different, or is one more correct? I have been accepted onto a course at the University of Stack Exchange I have been accepted to the Masters programme Are ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Choosing “with” vs. “in”

While doing some formal writing at my office, my friend told me that in is more apt than with in the following sentence. However, my understanding says when we talk about tools of action, we ...
3
votes
2answers
372 views

Is “Who is he?” ok when we don’t know the sex?

Suppose I see someone coming whose gender is unknown; how should I ask who the approaching person is? Should I say “Who is he?”
6
votes
3answers
922 views

Confirmation that someone is listening to another person's speech

When someone is telling you a very long and detailed story he usually wants to hear some "confirmations" (or response) that you are listening to his story. In Russian we often use something like "tak" ...
-1
votes
2answers
934 views

Meaning of “Meeting agenda”

I don’t really understand what a meeting agenda is. I don’t know if it is possible to use meeting agenda when you have to register all the topics (conclusions, ideas, members, date, etc.) of the ...
0
votes
1answer
158 views

simple word choice ,unabridged or unedited version

I don't know I whether I need to use unabridged version or unedited version for a radio podcast. Please explain the difference. Also, is "said" the right word in the clause below? "As he said in ...
3
votes
2answers
231 views

Question mark with your hands [closed]

How do you call a gesture of spreading one's hands and turning them palms up to suggest a question? As in "what did you just do, man? That was so weird that left me speechless, so I had to raise my ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

What would you call someone that you ask for directions?

I'm driving around and I stop to ask someone for directions to my destination, is there an English word for that person?
-1
votes
1answer
106 views

What is the difference between “Distribution Worker” and “Distributing Worker”? [duplicate]

I cannot differentiate when I should use a noun like "distribution" as an adjective to another noun, or when should I use an "-ing" participle as an adjective. Could you please clarify the differences ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

Use of “Pretty cool, huh?”

Would it be grammatically correct to use "Pretty cool, huh?" or would you need to use e.g: "Pretty cool, right?" I think that the "huh" would be asking a "what?", although that doesn't make sense in ...
4
votes
4answers
2k views

“Except for” vs. “except on”

I want to say that I have time to do the homework only on Sunday and on no other day. So can you help me choose which of the following sentences are considered idiomatic and common for native English-...
-2
votes
2answers
271 views

Each vs Every (Best way to make generalizations)

Example: There is a specific school. Every student in that school can take an Art class. They have that right, but they may choose not to take. What is the best way to say it by emphasizing that ...
-2
votes
1answer
124 views

to look into to find vs to look up? [closed]

Considering the two following sentences : List directories to look into to find ml files. List directories to look up ml files. The number 1 is the original one, the number 2 is the ...
-2
votes
1answer
109 views

When can “lose to”' be used instead of ''lose by''? [closed]

Could someone explain me why the following phrase uses the bolded to instead of (to my opinion) by? (This phrase has been extracted from a newspaper article.) Mr Bersani’s PD has been leading in ...
1
vote
1answer
593 views

Is this situation ironic or coincidental? [duplicate]

I'm under the impression irony is when the opposite of what you expect happens. Someone dies giving a safety presentation, for example. Coincidental, on the other hand, is when merely something ...
3
votes
2answers
585 views

Hypernym for “customer,” “supplier”, “manufacturer”

I need an abstraction for the above terms. In financial services, counterparty is often used. Another hypernym could be account (although this sounds more like a bank account, or user/login account)...
-1
votes
2answers
625 views

The Present Perfect vs The Past Tense in English [closed]

Would you agree that the present perfect is used more than the past tense by native speakers to emphasize the situation at hand? Some languages, like Arabic and Japanese, use the simple past much more....
1
vote
3answers
629 views

A word for “not needing directions in order to solve an issue”?

Is there a word to describe the ability to be able to complete tasks without necessarily needing instructions, i.e. finding it out yourself. It's for a personal profile in a CV.