This tag is for questions about choosing the best word from a given selection for a particular context or meaning.

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4
votes
2answers
401 views

Noun for “identifying with someone”

What is a noun for identifying with someone? In Hebrew there is quite a good word for it. I'm not looking for sympathy or empathy, but a proposed definition of sympathy does reflect my intent ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

words/phrases/idioms meaning either mundane/repetitive tasks, or inefficient methods? [closed]

What are some words, phrases, or idioms meaning either mundane or repetitive tasks, or inefficient methods? For example adding up numbers from 1 to 1000, the repetitive way would be adding them 1 by ...
7
votes
2answers
24k views

What is the difference between “inflection” and “intonation”?

And which is utilized when turning this... The monkey is fat. ...into a question: The monkey is fat?
3
votes
2answers
910 views

“What exactly” vs. “Exactly what”

What are the differences between these two phrases? For example, how would you qualify the difference between these two sentences: "What exactly is that book about?" and "Exactly what is that book ...
10
votes
6answers
9k views

Start a subordinate clause with “thus”

In an academic paper I'm using thus to indicate the conclusion of an argument. Today my professor said that thus should not be used in the beginning of a subordinate clause and suggested to use whence ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Is there a difference between “seemingly” and “apparently” [closed]

In the context of a business report would there be a difference (albeit subtle) between writing of "a seemingly unambitious plan" and "an apparently unambitious plan"? To me the first seems to ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Which is best: “with”, “by”, or “using”?

When I tried to write research paper about robotics, I felt confused in choosing these 3 words. For example, I want to write that I use mobile robot in exploring room and creating map of that room as ...
3
votes
2answers
368 views

Choice of words referring to being attacked/assaulted with a glass/cup

According to the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary the verb, glass, means to encase in glass. Recently, it has also come to mean being attacked or assaulted by a glass vessel/container as in this ...
2
votes
1answer
220 views

What is the name for the class of computer programs that act as a front end for a database? [closed]

If you are writing a computer program that manages a large database of clients, like a rolodex, or a program that stores medical records for patients. What is that "class" of program called. The ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Can “edition” be used to mean “the act of editing/changing something”?

As one say creation for "the act of creating something", couldn't the word edition mean "the act of changing something"? I was under the impression it was the case. But a remark from one of my ...
15
votes
3answers
5k views

Short Sleeves or Shirt Sleeves

I've always referred to a shirt that has short sleeves as a "short sleeve" shirt. However, I've also heard it be referred to as a "shirt sleeve" shirt or "wearing shirt sleeves." This seems like a ...
8
votes
3answers
23k views

“Checked shirt” vs “check shirt”

My son is learning English as a foreign language and I notice a mixture of British and American words in his vocab lists. Is there such thing as a checked shirt, or should it be a check shirt?
0
votes
2answers
3k views

What is correct: “I am an account manager” or “I am the account manager”?

While introducing oneself, which should one say, "I am an account manager, or "I am the account manager"?
1
vote
4answers
5k views

“Compete with” or “compete against”

Is it correct to say compete with or compete against? I think compete against is the proper way, but compete with is extremely popular these days. Here's an example: It should be Apple MacOS ...
7
votes
4answers
9k views

Word for someone who “sees the best in others”?

At the risk of being DRY: What's a powerful word for someone who "sees the best in others"?
2
votes
3answers
3k views

Word for “taking advantage of a second chance or opportunity”

Say a person doesn't act the first time around but gets a second chance and makes the right move. Is there any word that would describe such a situation or action?
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Is the idiom “in order” in order here?

A user at my site can offer to delete an article, she can add an explanation to her deletion proposal if she feels her proposal isn't clear enough. The message for asking for an explanation would be: ...
0
votes
1answer
15k views

“Major” vs “majoring”

Which one is correct and what is the difference? Majoring in Information Technology, xxx University Major in Information Technology, xxx University
1
vote
2answers
109 views

Scrape Data from Somewhere

Lets say I have such a data in somewhere on my computer: HELLO WORLD NANO TECH YAHOOO OOO GOOGLE 1111 MICROSOFT It is a .txt file and has the value above. I want to say: I scraped some of ...
0
votes
0answers
77 views

Should I use `a SSTP` or `an SSTP`? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? First of all let me clarify that SSTP is an abbreviation of a technical term. I want to know, when using ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Do “want to” and “have to” mean the same thing?

Which one of the following is correct? To shine like a sun, you want to burn like a sun. To shine like a sun, you have to burn like a sun.
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Subsequent, Consequent… Presequent?

Imagine the following: A -> B B is consequent (and subsequent) to A, because A implies B. How might one describe A relative to B? "Presequent" gets a few search results... but perhaps there's ...
3
votes
5answers
4k views

What would you call 'A person who is ready for support all the time'

What would you call 'A person who is ready for support all the time'? I wanted to write an email and convey to some clients that I will always be there for support, and was stuck when I got to this.
5
votes
3answers
2k views

“Unexplainable” vs “Inexplicable”

What is the difference between unexplainable and inexplicable? Are they exact synonyms or are there situations where one is preferred over the other? Is unexplainable a clumsy modern variant ...
7
votes
2answers
74k views

“Angry with” vs. “angry at” vs. “angry on”

Which is the most appropriate/correct usage? Are you angry on me? Are you angry with me? Are you angry at me?
1
vote
10answers
2k views

What word means “taking something to unrealistic extremes”?

This has been bugging me for a while, does anyone know what this word is? Maybe I imagined it. I thought it might have been "superfluous", but I don't think that is it, then I thought it might have ...
28
votes
8answers
7k views

What is wrong in “Please don't pluck the flowers” and other phrases used in the Indian subcontinent?

In the Indian subcontinent, especially India, there are many English words or phrases which are not a part of dictionary or not used in other parts of the world. The first one is "Please don't pluck ...
20
votes
3answers
789 views

What are the names of the pieces of a question mark?

A question mark ? seems to be composed of two distinct pieces, top and bottom. Do these pieces have their own names, and if so, what are they?
3
votes
2answers
134 views

(was + was) vs (was + is)

I was wondering what's the difference between these two sentences: The person who was at the head of the demonstration is Ms. Tan. The person who was at the head of the demonstration was Ms. ...
1
vote
4answers
3k views

“Same to” or “same as”

I have asked a question at the programming site, but I am not sure about my grammar, so I am going to ask here. Which is correct? What are other languages same to F#? What are other languages ...
8
votes
4answers
15k views

“Functionalities” vs “features” - what's the difference?

How are those two words different? Are they considered synonyms, especially when describing computer software?
1
vote
2answers
100 views

Is “the exchange (between Perry and Romney) was not the clear winner” a common English expression?

I noticed the line “the exchange was not the clear winner” in the following sentence of the article titled “The Take: Perry’s challenging road ahead” appearing in Washington Post Sept. 24 issue: “On ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Correct usage of (n)fold, where n is any integer greater than or equal to one? [closed]

Writing a rhetorical piece for my high school english class, I wanted to emphasize the sheer increase from 10 million to approximately 2 billion. Conveniently, 10 million is 200 times smaller than 2 ...
5
votes
2answers
537 views

Is my use of “knee-jerk reaction” correct?

Does it sound correct if I say "After the big earthquake, whenever I feel a slightly big quake, I immediately put myself under a table. It's like my knee-jerk reaction." Or should I use some other ...
5
votes
1answer
787 views

“Talking to” or “talking with”

Which of the following sentences is correct, and what is the difference in their meaning? I'll talk with Stuart and get back to you. I'll talk to Stuart and get back to you.
0
votes
3answers
211 views

Is the phrase “large number core machine” correct?

I would like to use the following phrase for a machine with large number cores. Is this correct? Please let me know. large number core machine
10
votes
1answer
6k views

Is “of” instead of “have” correct?

I have noticed a lot of people use of instead of have, for example: "that must of been really annoying". Is this correct?
3
votes
4answers
208 views

“Lung/brain cancer/tumours”

When people talk about illness, they tend to say they have lung cancer instead of lung tumours, or brain tumours instead of brain cancer. Why is this?
5
votes
3answers
3k views

“Each X” vs. “each of the Xs”

Are each X and each of the Xs interchangeable? For example, in the following sentence, I would use each of the characters: Each of the main characters is interesting. But one could also write ...
3
votes
3answers
13k views

“Located in” vs “located at”

What's the difference between them? I am interested in a generic definition, but here is the sentence I was writing: "The file is located at/in the images folder."
2
votes
3answers
5k views

What's the difference between a graph, a chart, and a plot?

A graph, a chart, and a plot can all refer to the same thing. Is there any even somewhat consistent distinction in these three words? (I mean, in this particular sense of the words; it is not ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

“Make/do/take/run/keep/give a laugh” — which one makes sense?

My daughter's teacher (a Canadian in Italy) gave the class an exercise. They had to choose among make, do, take, run, keep and give, and insert the correct response in front of "a laugh". We are ...
2
votes
2answers
158 views

Fox News comment on Romney--“self abjination?”

Watching the discussion led by Dana Perino after the GOP debate this evening, Perino asked if "humility" was a good thing. Another commentator remarked, "humility yes, self-abjination no." (The ...
8
votes
2answers
4k views

In reply to “Do they have…”, which is correct — “yes, they do” or “yes, they have”?

My daughter is in an 5th grade English class in Germany with a teacher who teaches British English. The teacher asked what is the correct response to Do they have some? My daughter, who has ...
4
votes
7answers
2k views

What’s “maiden name” all about?

I was pondering the term maiden name when talking with British English speakers recently. They don’t seem to have that term. So my question is two-fold: Is there another term for maiden name, ...
4
votes
3answers
296 views

Is this usage of “woo” proper?

John doesn't actively participate in class discussion, unlike his classmates. He thinks they act a bit overly and he doesn't like to woo the teachers. Woo has two meanings: Try to gain ...
2
votes
2answers
576 views

“Into” vs “in to” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should “into” be used rather than “in to,” and vice versa? Google Support: Visit Google.com. Search for NS lookup. Select a ...
2
votes
1answer
729 views

“A number of programs” vs. “several programs”

I am always confused between "a number of programs" and "several programs" for saying "many programs". Google Ngrams show that both are widely used terms. Could someone tell me which one should be ...
2
votes
3answers
5k views

Is “uncomplete” a word? [closed]

Or would I just use incomplete? Would there be any instance that one would uncomplete?
2
votes
1answer
97 views

Use of “memory”

Does the sentence His memory is lost have these two meanings? It could mean that our memory of him is lost. It could mean that he has lost his memory.