This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning.

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4
votes
2answers
2k views

Is it normal to use “absent” as a preposition instead of ‘without,’ or ‘in the absence of’?

In the following sentence of today’s Time magazine’s article titled "Obama's Afghanistan problem: Neither Karzai nor the Taliban like the 'Reconciliation' Script," the word absent appears to be used ...
3
votes
5answers
1k views

Can something become “increasingly smaller”?

I was reading a news story recently, and saw this sentence: "Police used tear gas and what appeared to be plastic bullets against increasingly smaller groups of protesters." I wasn't sure if it ...
5
votes
2answers
554 views

Is “proven” very old -fashioned?

I occasionally see the participle "proven" in mathematical texts, instead of "proved". Of course I realize that this a deliberate archaism, but I wanted to know if this is still used in books or ...
4
votes
2answers
28k views

“as follows” vs “as the following”

As follows sounds more correct to me, as the following sounds super wrong to me,but just wanted to hear your opinion as well on this one, is "as the following" a legit phrase when listing things that ...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

“Force” vs. “enforce” vs. “compel” vs. “obligate” vs. “oblige”

I am trying to write a technical document, and I've been scratching my hair out, since I need to explain things with formal proper technical English, here is my question: Does System shall ...
0
votes
2answers
887 views

“Barrier will open” vs. “barrier will be opened”

To me "barrier will open" sounds more correct. I am not 100% sure if "barrier will be opened" is acceptable. What do you think?
1
vote
4answers
18k views

“stress” vs. “distress”

From Cambridge dictionary, stress - great worry caused by a difficult situation. distress - extreme worry, sadness, pain. I'm not sure if the words 'distress' and 'stress' have the same ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“What/Which word best describes XXX ?” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Which” vs “what” - what's the difference and when should you use one or the other? Which of the following two phrases is the more correct or ...
2
votes
1answer
247 views

“Imitation jewelry” or “costume jewelry”

I've looked up the translation of the word bisutería in Spanish and it translated to imitation jewelry or costume jewelry. Which of the two is mostly used in British English?
3
votes
5answers
2k views

What's the right way of expressing a desire to meet with someone in the future on the multiple basis?

What's the right way of expressing a desire to meet with someone in the future on the multiple basis (unspecified number of times, but definitely more than once)? We should surely meet again ...
0
votes
2answers
395 views

Reaching a conclusion before formulating an argument

What is a good word for saying that a person has reached a conclusion before properly formulating an argument? For example, a logical train of thought would be 'My current computer is slow, this is ...
4
votes
3answers
789 views

What do you say when a person/an idea/… is crazy to your mind?

What does one say or do if they think that a person's idea, behaviour, etc. is crazy to their mind? For instance: In Germany, when someone dangerously passes you, you will show them by tipping your ...
17
votes
10answers
2k views

What is an appropriate word for a “rerise”?

I'm wondering if there is a more appropriate term in English that describes a rise of something (like a nation) that has already achieved that status before, like a second rise or re-rise.
0
votes
3answers
221 views

“Will” vs. “going to” vs. Present Continious [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “The train will leave” vs. “is going to leave” vs. “leaves” vs. “is leaving” Here are three sentences: David is going ...
3
votes
5answers
384 views

“The lyrics to the song” vs. “the lyrics of the song”

Do you remember the lyrics to the song? Do you remember the lyrics of the song? I'm more familiar with the second sentence using the "of". But what I don't know is, how would you ...
0
votes
2answers
325 views

“Rotate image” vs. “spin image”

I need to title an application button that moves an image 90 degrees clockwise/anticlockwise. Which of the following fits better? Spin image Rotate image
0
votes
1answer
4k views

“At day five”, “on day five”, or something else?

When considering a set of days and writing about them in a 'diary mode', what preposition should I use in the following example: He died at day 5 of the treatment. He died on day 5 of the ...
1
vote
3answers
647 views

“Fetch some water in a quiver” or “Get some water in a quiver”?

What is the most effective and correct way to use the sentences? 1) He requested his friend to fetch some water in a quiver. 2) He requested his friend to get some water in a quiver. Is there any ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

The difference between “look at” and “see”

What is the difference between look at and see? For example: Can I look at it? Can I see it? Let's go to look at him. Let's go to see him.
3
votes
0answers
7k views

comprehendible vs comprehensible [closed]

Just got into a debate at work whether comprehendible is a word. It appears as I type this that comprehensible is preferred in Firefox's dictionary. However, when I used Outlook's spellchecker it ...
2
votes
1answer
40k views

Correct use of “but”, “however” and “although”

I am not sure which conjunction to use in the following context: I know about programming but I have a little bit of confusion in Java programming. I know about programming although I have a ...
3
votes
2answers
9k views

Capitalizing the names of different animal breeds?

I've already looked around for an answer to this question, but many answers contradict each other. What I'd like to know is whether or not different animal breeds are capitalized in professional ...
0
votes
1answer
117 views

“The truth about” vs. “the truth on”

Which preposition is correct here? The truth about "Unlimited". The truth on "Unlimited". The meaning of the sentence is roughly, exposing the truth of a concept, for example ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

What does “get to” mean?

I know there are a lot of meanings to the verb "get", so I am unable to understand which one is used in the following sentence: They had a baby which was different, so it got to live. I know ...
0
votes
2answers
775 views

Difference between “get rid of” and “rid of”

What is the difference between the two? Would the following sentence work with "get rid of"? We need to rid the world of hunger.
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Is it “5–6 weeks are a lot of time” or “5–6 weeks is a lot of time”?

I was just copyediting somebody's answer on another SE site and my native English speaker Sprachgefühl told me I had to correct the grammar of one sentence: ... 5–6 weeks are a lot of time ... ...
7
votes
5answers
9k views

Is it “damping” or “dampening” when referring to sound?

When one refers to the act of modifying a physical object so as to make it better at absorbing sound vibrations, is that "damping" or "dampening" the object? I've seen both, and looking them up in the ...
2
votes
3answers
8k views

What is the difference between the nouns start and beginning?

I'm curious about the general difference between the two, but I have to be more specific. I'd like to know the difference in the context of the noun period — should I use "the start of the period" ...
10
votes
4answers
5k views

“Duplicate data” or “duplicated data”?

I'm making a presentation and I need to know if I should use "duplicated data" or "duplicate data". Is there any difference? I'm talking about removing observations of a database that are duplicates.
1
vote
2answers
788 views

Take my photo, take a photo of me

Please tell me, is there any difference when saying take his photo and take a photo of him? To me, the first one sounds awkward.
3
votes
3answers
337 views

Alternative word for “media” for disks, USB storage etc

I'm looking for a generic word to describe (removable) computer storage such as CDs, USB sticks, floppies etc which is as clear as possible to non-technical people. It doesn't have to clearly ...
4
votes
3answers
18k views

Can one meet criteria, or satisfy requirements?

I usually see 'satisfy the criteria' and 'meet the requirements', but is it acceptable to use 'meet the criteria', or 'satisfy the requirements'?
0
votes
3answers
930 views

What is land area under house called besides the whole land?

I am looking for the term which is used to specify the Land Area occupied by the house only.
1
vote
2answers
2k views

The real tense of “I'm going to be talking about”

I just listened to a video in which the speaker said "I'm going to be talking about....". Can we change that to "I'm going to talk about..."?
0
votes
4answers
1k views

Is “relatively big compared to” redundant?

If I say something like He is big compared to the other guy. He is relatively big compared to the other guy. is the adverb relatively wrong because of redundancy?
2
votes
4answers
574 views

Which is the right sentence?

I was typing in a description and I got the following problem, and I don't know which of the sentences is the right one. The angel's image, now appears correctly. The angel's image now appears ...
3
votes
6answers
35k views

Mongoloid with reference to Down's syndrome

Could we use mongoloid with reference to Down's syndrome in informal English?
1
vote
3answers
370 views

Alternative to “façade”

In software development, I’m using the so-called “Façade Pattern” to hide the complexity of a workflow via abstraction and encapsulation. I’m naming my classes using a “_Façade” suffix, so like ...
13
votes
4answers
68k views

Bachelor thesis or Bachelor's thesis

During my final year at university, I wrote what I thought was a "bachelor thesis". Right before printing it I stumbled upon several documents stating the name "bachelor's thesis". (Here we do not ...
3
votes
2answers
262 views

Are “excerpt” and “excerption” interchangeable?

Can excerpt and excerption replace each other in a particular sentence without changing its meaning? For example, given these two sentences: He presented excerpts from William James' ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Does one 'have' or does one 'hold' a fascination?

I know that a fascination 'holds' the individual, but how does one phrase the act of being fascinated? i.e.; does one 'hold' or does one 'have' a fascination? Would it be more appropriate to say that ...
6
votes
4answers
24k views

“I have no …” vs. “I don't have …”

I have no house. I don't have a house. What's the difference between the phrases like the ones above?
1
vote
0answers
62 views

Difference between “a few minutes” and “few minutes” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “A few” vs. “few” What is the difference between "a few minutes" and "few minutes"? For instance, how do these statements differ? She has ...
1
vote
2answers
481 views

“A disliking of” vs. “a disliking for”

I was having a conversation with a friend, telling him that over time, I've started to dislike a certain genre of music: I've grown a strong disliking for Dubstep. As though my liking for ...
1
vote
2answers
952 views

Can I say “acquiesce” and be acquiescent?

Can I say "acquiesce" and be acquiescent, or by saying the word do I then imply a protest, negating my acquiescence? Example: "I acquiesce to your request." To me, it seems that speaking the word ...
10
votes
7answers
28k views

“On/at/for/over the weekend” in American English

Some sources say that "at the weekend" is wrong, while other ones say it's correct. Which form is acceptable in American English? On Saturdays her sister Ann usually comes to stay with Mary ...
19
votes
4answers
35k views

“A bit” vs. “a little bit” vs. “a little”

Is there a difference between a bit, a little bit and a little in the following context? He is a little bit angry. He is a little angry. He is a bit angry. Or do these sentences mean the ...
-1
votes
2answers
56 views

What should I use? “The ways of something” or “The path of something” [closed]

I am always learning stuff about computers and I switch between saying "The Path of the Computer Knowledge" and "The Ways of Computers" every time. When I use those expressions I want to express that ...
0
votes
3answers
156 views

“That's the idea that someone does” vs. “it has the idea of someone does”

I'm trying to explain what something means. Is it correct to express that using the word "idea" as follows? He pulls up next to him. To pull up (pause). That's the idea that someone does X. ...
1
vote
3answers
121 views

“Location of the windows to be opened” vs. “location of windows to be opened”

I have redefined the size and location of the windows to be opened. I have redefined the size and location of windows to be opened. Which one is correct?