This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning. The selection to choose from will appear in the question.

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5
votes
1answer
33k views

“Upload to” vs. “upload on”

Which preposition should follow the verb to upload — to, on, or something else?
10
votes
3answers
1k views

“You are likely to [verb]” vs. “you are like to [verb]”

In a recent answer to another question, a fellow poster just used the following turn of phrase: The nearest you’re like to get is [word][.] I only ever saw and used "you’re likely to..." myself, ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“Something suffices the condition that” vs. “it suffices that something”

In a book I am reading there is a sentence: Our initial version of Cauchy's theorem begins with the observation that it suffices that f(z) [a function] have a primitive in a region Ω In ...
5
votes
2answers
866 views

What is a term to refer something in the middle of a list just like “former” and “latter” is used in a list containing two things?

In a sentence, if someone says the former, they are talking about the first thing they listed, and says the latter for the last thing they listed. What would be the term to refer something in the ...
0
votes
2answers
184 views

What is the word for previous boss’s recommendations in the context of a CV?

In my CV, I am trying to explain that a written recommendation from my previous boss is available upon request. What is that document called?
5
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the difference between “carry out a crime” and “commit a crime”

Do these both have the same meaning? John carried out a crime. John committed a crime.
0
votes
3answers
503 views

“Attempts to acquaint” vs. “attempts at acquainting”

The research study is an eye-opener and attempts to acquaint/attempts at acquainting us with the problems of poor nations. For me, attempts to acquaint sounds more apt. But I am not sure ...
3
votes
1answer
4k views

“Through” vs. “by” in this sentence

While solving a question, I came in to a situation where I was left wondering between two of the choices. The sentence was: Acquisition of certain specific skills can be facilitated by/through ...
3
votes
2answers
411 views

Hallucinating + [preposition]

I’m trying to decide which preposition to use to complete a statement about Charlotte Perkins Gillman’s short story “The Yellow Wallpaper”. I am describing how a hysterical woman sees things in her ...
1
vote
2answers
8k views

“I love you for who you are” vs. “I love you as you are” vs. “I love you for what you are” [closed]

I love you for who you are. I came across the line from a BBC Radio’s drama, and wondered what’s the difference from saying “I love you as you are,” or “I love you for what you are.” Would you ...
4
votes
2answers
836 views

Is “titular” the appropriate word for a song that only uses the album title in its lyrics, not title?

Is a song on a music album considered to be the titular song if it doesn't share the title of the album, but incorporates it into the lyrics? If not, is there another appropriate term for this lyrical ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

“You and your” vs. “Your and your”

Which is correct, and why? identifying you and your competitors’ relative market performance or identifying your and your competitors’ relative market performance Each entity is in ...
1
vote
2answers
683 views

What is the difference between “nudge” and “push” [closed]

I am trying to nudge them towards a practical solution. What does nudge imply here? Can't we just use something like push? Is the word outdated or still in use? I'm not trying to avoid using ...
8
votes
3answers
75k views

“Please note” vs. “please notice” [closed]

When I'm writing a text and want to ask the reader to pay close attention to a point, should I write "Please note" or "Please notice"? Is there any difference?
3
votes
3answers
3k views

“Is this the right way?” vs “Is this the correct way?” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “right” vs “correct” I've had this question for a long time. Which sentence is grammatically correct? Is this the right way? Is this the correct way?
1
vote
2answers
449 views

Mixing adjective and noun enumerations

I am having trouble writing a seemingly simple sentence. I am organising an event where three kinds of food will be served: hot beverages cold beverages finger food My trouble deals with putting ...
6
votes
4answers
3k views

Adjective describing a person who does work to get it done

I have a friend who always goes on that I have a bad work ethic, though I am not lazy. At the same time, he says he has a good work ethic, but is lazy. The definition of having a good work ethic is ...
6
votes
2answers
7k views

Is it possible to use “extraordinaire” instead of “extraordinary”?

Since they are both adjectives, is it possible to use them interchangeably on various occasions? When is the right time to use extraordinaire?
4
votes
1answer
272 views

Name for a company that resells products [closed]

I'm looking for a single word to call a company that does not manufacture products, but instead buys them and sells them again at a different price. I came up with "reseller company"; is this a good ...
4
votes
2answers
184k views

“Regards” vs. “Best regards” vs. “With regards” [closed]

Which of the three phrases in the concluding phrase is most appropriate when sending a work-related email? Could the three be ranked in terms of their overall level of formality?
4
votes
5answers
3k views

What is the difference between “section” and “part”?

What is the difference between "section" and "part"? The Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English says for "section": one of the parts that something such as an object or place is divided ...
7
votes
3answers
10k views

Using “reachable” instead of “available”

Is it possible to use reachable as a replacement for available? I noticed that some dictionaries don't have the former term in their database. Is there any origin for this word?
7
votes
4answers
633 views

Need a word that describes a biweekly publication

Our company publishes an internal e-newsletter that we call the <Title> Weekly. We're now going to publish every other week, so the title needs to be changed. The first solution that came to ...
6
votes
5answers
6k views

Do Americans use the term “garburator” or is there a better equivalent?

Is it obsolete to use the term garburator to refer to a garbage disposal unit in a kitchen? If it is, do we have a better term to replace it with? Also, what is the etymology of this word?
2
votes
3answers
43k views

“Knowledge of” vs. “knowledge on”

She tried to figure out how much knowledge my class had of the real Pocahontas. Should I use of or on there?
5
votes
6answers
4k views

How to say the opposite of “check” (for lists)?

Suppose you enumerate points of some list, adding "check" after each one. How to speak about the reverse of a "check" (i.e. omission or an opposite for the item)? Like if you have: Big scary horns ...
-1
votes
2answers
1k views

Another way to say: “Evidences that show that…” [closed]

I need to write something similar to this: Evidences that show that this method is both safe and provides clinical benefits support its recommendation. I would like to say it without using ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Is there a difference between “ascendants” and “ancestors”?

Without noticing myself, I've mixed the use of "ascendants" and "ancestors" in some documentation I've written. In an arbitrary hierarchy (of either people or things), what would be the most correct ...
0
votes
2answers
441 views

Usage of “against” in “progress against our strategic objectives”

I have one more question concerning Lucy Kellaway’s 2012 Golden flannel Award . The another contender of the Preposition Award was a usage of against. The first was shown to advantage recently in ...
-1
votes
3answers
185 views

“Winter sales” vs. “winter discounts” vs. “winter offers” [closed]

We have a service, and we provide season discounts at this time of the year. Which of the following is the most preferable? The winter sales started at "Company X"! The winter discounts ...
3
votes
1answer
556 views

“Chance of [gerund]” vs. “chance at [gerund]”

Which is correct? If you tell me the cause, I will have a better chance at fixing the problem. If you tell me the cause, I will have a better chance of fixing the problem. A quick ...
1
vote
4answers
139 views

The centrality that does not need to be named

Suppose we are looking at Internet domain names. Every country has its own two-letter abbreviation (.fr, .uk, .ca, .za, etc.) — except for the US, as far as I know. They have .com, .org, .edu, ...
0
votes
6answers
512 views

Looking for a formal equivalent phrase for the adverb “personally”

Which one is correct: "personal basis" or "individual basis"? I want to use it in a formal letter. I want to say: "I don't know Mr. X on a personal basis (or individual basis) and I have not had an ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

“He is me” — is this grammatical?

Referring to a picture, the question is "Who is he?" The answer I got back was "he is me". Is that correct? Shouldn't it be "It is me"?
4
votes
2answers
241 views

When would I use “transience” vs “impermanence”?

I was looking for the translation of the German word "Vergänglichkeit", and the most suitable candidates from the contexts I looked at seemed to be impermanence and transience. I found the following ...
-1
votes
3answers
157 views

Saying that some action is optional

I am trying to find phrase or word which would properly cover following statement: You can bring back the book tomorrow if you like, and if not it is fine. I am trying to find a way to same that ...
50
votes
14answers
25k views

What do you call a person who started something that is later followed by everyone?

What do you call a person who started something that is later followed by everyone? For example, someone started to stay late at night till 8 p.m. and later everyone started to stay till 8 p.m..
1
vote
2answers
682 views

“Stop a loophole” vs. “fix a loophole”

Which is the preferred usage — "to stop a loophole" or "to fix a loophole"?
4
votes
4answers
628 views

Usage of “to” in “I've got some slides to talk to”

In Lucy Kellaway’s 2012 Golden flannel Award, the Preposition Award is given to a usage of to. But the winner is the innocuous word “to” as increasingly heard in presentations: “I’ve got some ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

Difference in usage between “expat” and “emigrant”?

Is there a difference in usage between expat and emigrant? I believe I encounter the former mostly in positive contexts, describing highly-skilled professionals ("expat guide to [country]"), and the ...
2
votes
4answers
289 views

Can “conceived” be used as “assumed”?

For example: Jack thinks he's responsible for killing his mother and thus for his uncle’s conceived hatred towards him. Here, I mean to say that Jack assumes his uncle hates him (of course, ...
2
votes
4answers
223 views

Is it okay using “The thing is” as filler?

I often use expression "The thing is" as filler a lot like this: See, the thing is, they did not want to watch the movie that is why went there. I might as well say it without it, since it does ...
5
votes
4answers
52k views

“In the hope of” vs. “with the hope of”

While solving a question I encountered a situation when there was a subtle difference between the two: After meeting together near Mediolanurn in 313, Roman Emperors Constantine Augustus and ...
2
votes
5answers
660 views

Usage of “studying books”

I'm not a native English speaker. I was recently chided for wrongly using studying as follows: acquiring information by studying books Is this really wrong?
6
votes
3answers
252 views

Is it safe to use “old” to mean “previous” for a person?

Is it safe to use "old" to mean "previous" or "former" for something like "my old teacher"? Or is it a bit risky, because "old" also has a meaning with respect to age (i.e., chronologically gifted)? ...
6
votes
5answers
394 views

A word for non-language sound

I am looking for a word that describes audio that does not contain words. For instance: John William's piece Duel of the Fates would be this, since they are just vocables for their musical effect, ...
0
votes
2answers
176 views

On the usage of “epitomized”

Epitomized by right captainship, the ship reached safely to the harbor. I'm emphasizing the capabilities of the captain here. Is this correct usage?
4
votes
2answers
22k views

What is the difference between seems like /seems that/seems?

Is there any difference between these expressions? It seems like they have not completed the task yet. It seems that they have not completed the task yet. It seems they haven't ...
0
votes
2answers
294 views

Alternative to the word reprimand? [closed]

I looked into the dictionary for words similar to reprimand in this expression, I was reprimanded by the cops for reckless driving. I checked on the web for reprimand and found lots of ...
0
votes
1answer
432 views

Adjective/noun usage, use of 'ones', comparing A with B

Please tell me which sounds better: “In the other three cases a positive deviation of about 2 or 3 mm is observed when comparing the measured with the calculated values.” or “In the other ...