This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning.

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4
votes
1answer
168 views

Use of the word “lore”

Should I use the word lore when speaking about knowledge that is connected to a specific domain, or would it be better to use the expression "professional knowledge"?
1
vote
3answers
402 views

“I'm not X, am I?” vs. “I'm not X, do I?” [closed]

Which of the following is correct or better? Can they both be used? I'm not making any sense, am I? I'm not making any sense, do I?
5
votes
5answers
18k views

What word describes a person who signs an official document?

For example, I have a document that has the signatures of three people, all public servants: a tax collector,an inspector, and a school principal. How could I collectively describe these three people? ...
2
votes
2answers
5k views

“From - Till” vs “From - To”

I read an experience letter which said "So and so" person has worked from "date1" till "date2". Is it okay? Or should it be like this? "So and so" person has worked from "date1" to "date2". ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

“In a list” vs. “on a list”

In the following sentence, should I use in or on? If i ever make a list,not only you'll be in/on it,you'll top it too.
0
votes
2answers
137 views

Using “strong” for song

Can we say "strong song" or should we say "powerful song" ? I want to imply that that it's vocal performance is powerful but then I thought "strong" is for describing something physical not a song ...
4
votes
4answers
34k views

“Henceforth” vs. “hereinafter”

What is the most suitable way to express that a sentence/word will be "replaced by" another sentence/word, from that point (in a text, for instance)? Henceforth called/named... Hereinafter ...
0
votes
1answer
392 views

“Inquiry” vs. “investigation” [closed]

When I'm involved in a project with the goal of analyzing (following some previously stated criteria) a set of research papers, which word is more suitable: inquiry or investigation? Or neither? If ...
0
votes
2answers
203 views

'For' versus 'toward'

Are these sentences both grammatical ? "This is a big step towards the project's completion." "This is a big step for the project's completion." If so, how do we decide between the ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“Skills that are useful” or “skills those are useful”?

I am used to using the phrase that is a lot, for example: "I have a skill that is useful in this situation". What if I use a plural form? What is the correct sentence of the following two? I ...
1
vote
2answers
8k views

“Do my best” vs. “my level best” [closed]

Is there any difference between these two sentences? Which one is grammatical in speech? I will do my best. I will do my level best.
0
votes
2answers
354 views

“bio“ VS “autobiography“ for a text field where users fill up their life stories (or histories)

The Oxford English Dictionary states that bio is an informal form of biography and biography An account of someone’s life written by someone else. So... Would it be more accurate to use ...
3
votes
6answers
23k views

“One-to-one” vs. “one-on-one”

I said: "Tomorrow will be our one-to-one meeting with Mr.XYZ." My friend: "OK, one-on-one." Which is correct? One-to-one Or One-on-one
-2
votes
2answers
228 views

Silly questions, like X is/are a complete waste of time?

I'm stumped with this one. Given the question, "What did you learn from doing this task?", which of the following answers is correct? That silly questions, like "What did you learn from doing ...
2
votes
2answers
151 views

“…who didn't have a…” vs “…without a…” [closed]

I titled a short story "The Girl without a Soul". But recently I've been thinking on naming it "The Girl who didn't have a Soul." Do they mean exactly the same? Which sounds better as a name for a ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

'Usually' Or 'Normally'

I think use of "usually" and "normally" is similar in English usage, and both are correct and exchangeable. I prefer 'normally' in most of my writings. Is there any suggestion for me?
0
votes
2answers
261 views

How to “spread some words about” or “spread some word about”?

Sorry for the dumb question. If I have couple of sentences that describe my idea, should I use the first or the second phrase or neither of them ;) Any insight and grammar references are very ...
3
votes
7answers
2k views

What is the opposite of 'cozy'?

I'm trying to find a word to describe a restaurant space that is the opposite of cozy. The only word I can think of is cavernous, however I don't wish to give the sense that the space is particularly ...
15
votes
3answers
750 views

What are wrong with this phrase?

Is the phrase what are wrong with XY and ZZ correct English? I stumbled upon it in a question on movies.SE: What are wrong with the bleach and the fish in the Machinist?, and instantly thought ...
2
votes
3answers
367 views

What does “dot-bomb” mean?

On The New York Times I read the following sentence: The bad news here begins with the economy, which stinks. This is the epicenter of the dot-bomb, the edge of the ailing Pacific Rim and now ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

“He was the first person” vs. “he is the first person”

What is the correct tense to be used when talking about firsts? He was the first person to reach the South Pole. He is the first person to reach the South Pole. The first one seems right, ...
2
votes
1answer
286 views

Is it possible to rephrase “we're going to bring back that hulking hunk of bumbling brawn”? [closed]

The context of the following quote is from the comic book Avengers. In a circus, the ringmaster introduces a brawny guy by saying: First off today, we're going to bring back that hulking hunk of ...
1
vote
4answers
5k views

Are 'effectually' and 'effectively' completely interchangable?

In the OED: effectively, (adverb)—in such a manner as to achieve a desired result: make sure that resources are used effectively. effectual, (adjective)—successful in producing ...
1
vote
3answers
91 views

“Doctor Pérez did some surgery on my knee”?

What is the natural way to say in English that a certain doctor did some surgery on — for instance — my knee? In Spanish we say "El doctor Pérez me operó la rodilla". Is the following ...
0
votes
3answers
201 views

What is the difference between a map tile and a map section? [closed]

We are translating the great OpenStreetMap editor JOSM to Hungarian and arguing on the translation of "map tile". Some of us state that it should be literally translated, because map tile and map ...
5
votes
5answers
4k views

Are “Lord” and “God” interchangeable?

Is there any difference between “The Lord is my shepherd” and “The God is my shepherd”? Are Lord and God interchangeable?
1
vote
2answers
220 views

“Finish/complete/resolve an overdue project” [closed]

I use the number of results in a Google search of a phrase as a rough estimate of its usage. I googled all three and got: "finish an overdue project" — 1920 results "complete an overdue project" — ...
2
votes
2answers
12k views

“I am going to bed” vs. “I will be going to bed”

What is the difference between saying the following? I am going to bed in a few minutes. I will be going to bed in a few minutes. Or I will be getting off here. Or, I guess, I will be ...
1
vote
2answers
266 views

Difference between “collaborative environment” and “collaboration environment”

I've seen these phrases in some technical articles. Is there any difference between these phrases?
0
votes
8answers
2k views

Word to describe being useful to many people

I am trying to find a word to describe a project I am working on. This project has one function, but will be useful to as many people as possible (as many people as meet the requirements to use the ...
1
vote
3answers
181 views

Is there a word meaning “true-on-average”? [closed]

Economist Bryan Caplan asks: What's a good word for "true-on-average"? Can we help him out?
1
vote
6answers
540 views

How far is the safari park from here?

Which is/are the correct and natural answer(s) to this question? It is ten miles far from here. It is ten miles far away from here. It is ten miles far away. It is ten miles away. ...
3
votes
5answers
20k views

Difference between 'infectious' and 'contagious'

On Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary we read: Infectious: an infectious disease can be passed easily from one person to another, especially through the air they breathe. Contagious: if a ...
1
vote
3answers
196 views

How to say “generating errors” in one word?

Erroneous means containing errors. I wanted to say about files that generate errors in a computer program, so I posted on a public mailing list: errogenous files. Could it be better? By better I don't ...
5
votes
1answer
25k views

Is saying 'Good Noon' valid?

How should I greet between 12pm and 2pm? Should I say 'Good Afternoon' or 'Good Noon'? Is Good Noon commonly used or not?
6
votes
4answers
2k views

Which preposition to use in “to live in fear […] one's life”

I am being threatened by unsavory sorts. I am now living in fear for my life. or I am now living in fear of my life.
2
votes
2answers
197 views

Applications in vs. applications to

I’m one semester away from completing my master’s studies of the applications of eye tracking in/to interactive media. In this context, what is the difference between the applications of ...
1
vote
3answers
466 views

Inclusive “or” in speech [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Alternatives to “and/or”? This has bothered me for a long time. As a software developer, the or is inclusive (xor is exclusive and rarely used / not ...
1
vote
8answers
15k views

A Good Phrase to Replace “Get To Know”

This is what I want to express: I want to get to know more algorithms that have been created. I have thought about changing the sentence into I want to gain a better insight into algorithms ...
1
vote
2answers
161 views

Is “for all who” grammatical? [closed]

The context is: The blog for all who want to learn German. I feel like this is not correct, but the only alternative I can think of is: The blog for all those who want to learn German. ...
0
votes
4answers
628 views

“Forget” vs. “would forget” vs. “forgets”

Is the format of this sentence correct: If he had to describe himself in 5 words, he’d say he’s curious. And then forget to give you 4 more words. There were some conflicts between a colleague ...
5
votes
3answers
570 views

“Swim teacher” or “swimming teacher”

I am pretty sure that both "swim teacher" and "swimming teacher" are valid, but are there any rules that would make one preferable to the other? As a British English speaker, "swimming teacher" is ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

Alternative phrase for “Service user”?

I am looking for a phrase to replace the term "Service user". There are two different contexts. Someone receiving services from a mental health trust. Someone who received services in the past, or ...
2
votes
1answer
395 views

“Continue existing there” or “continuing existing there”

I wrote the following sentences: Eyed closed, he imagined the moment disintegrating, returning to the stars, and continue existing there for eternity. Eyed closed, he imagined the moment ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

“Reaction to” or “reaction at”?

Here's the context: So has gone the reaction of many to the news that Facebook is buying the mobile photo-sharing service Instagram[.] Could "at" be used as well? I was taught that, when it ...
2
votes
6answers
560 views

Alternative to 'hype' for an academic paper

I am working on an academic paper, and I want to describe the scientific community's hype regarding a certain technology. The word 'hype' is concise and describes exactly what I mean, but I'm not sure ...
1
vote
0answers
1k views

“To a T” or “To a Tee”, and where does it come from? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Origin of “Fits [x] to a T”? I frequently hear the phrase "To a T[ee]", but I'm not sure that I've ever seen it written. What is the correct way to write ...
9
votes
4answers
2k views

Is this correct grammar: “[…] cash can't be beat.”

I found the following phrase in a NYTimes article and I was pretty surprised that it wasn't corrected or edited out: "But when it comes to privacy and freedom, cash can't be beat.". I am under the ...
5
votes
1answer
3k views

“Example where” or “example in which”

I think both are correct but is that true and what is the difference between them (if there is any)? This is an example where you can see that... This is an example in which you can see ...
4
votes
2answers
14k views

Use of “in this light”

In my language there is an idiom in this light which roughly means from this perspective or in connection with this. Can I use this idiom in English? For example, This presidential candidate was ...