This tag is for questions about choosing the best word for a particular context or meaning.

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2
votes
2answers
436 views

Does “She is in love with Tom” imply that Tom loves her too?

Does "She is in love with Tom" imply that Tom loves her too?
2
votes
2answers
1k views

What's the difference between “I'm in love with her” and “I love her”?

What's the difference between "I'm in love with her" and "I love her"?
0
votes
4answers
22k views

What's the difference between “You have my word” and “I promise”?

What's the difference between you have my word and I promise?
2
votes
7answers
4k views

“Injured” vs. “wounded”

I just saw a news report in which the reporter said: "They used the term injured and not wounded". I am wondering what the difference between the two is. Is wounded used only when there is an open ...
20
votes
9answers
55k views

Using “dear”, “darling”, or “honey” to address a friend

As far as I know dear, darling, and honey are commonly used between lovers, but I suppose there are more words like that. What else is commonly used? Which of these can be used to address a ...
2
votes
3answers
500 views

Alternatives to “this last point”

What alternatives are there to the expression "this last point"? I'll give an example of a sentence that I wrote recently, referring to the Jane Austen novel Pride and Prejudice: The dialog and ...
4
votes
4answers
3k views

Is there a canonic term for “the one whose birthday party is being celebrated”?

Something along the lines of 'hero of the occasion', but specifically for birthday? If there isn't, how would you otherwise say that? ('the subject of birthday party', 'the hero of this birthday ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

“Any ideas are appreciated” or “Any ideas would be appreciated”?

Lets say I'm asking a question on a popular question and answer website, and I want to close by saying that I will appreciate any submitted ideas. The first seems awkward because at the moment of ...
15
votes
7answers
33k views

What is the difference between “nothing but”, “anything but”, and “everything but”?

What is the difference between these phrases? When is it valid to use which? Should they be avoided as being ambiguous?
3
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the difference in meaning between “I play” and “I do play”? [closed]

What is the difference between I play and I do play? For example: If someone were to ask to me, do you play soccer?
2
votes
3answers
830 views

Importance of writing down Mission Statement in improving English proficiency, Do I really need to?

The Asahi, one of leading Japanese newspapers carried a half page feature article titled “Brush Up Your English Proficiency This Year!” on its January 5 issue. In this article, a well-known English ...
3
votes
5answers
16k views

“On the weekend” or “during the weekend”

Which is correct? I will see her on the weekend. I will see her during the weekend.
5
votes
7answers
11k views

Is there any difference between “famous” and “popular”?

Is there any difference between famous and popular?
4
votes
7answers
9k views

“Shade” vs. “shadow”

What are the differences between shade and shadow? Do they have different meanings or can they be used interchangeably? Let's sit under the shade/shadow. The cat was afraid of its own ...
15
votes
5answers
12k views

What is the difference between “gift” and “present”?

What is the difference between gift and present?
6
votes
7answers
3k views

What's the difference in meaning and usage between “target” and “goal”?

What are the differences in usage and meaning? For example, is it, My targets for 2011 are... or My goals for 2011 are... Which one is correct or more suitable here?
4
votes
6answers
10k views

What is the difference between “Class of 2004” and “Batch of 2004”?

What is the difference between "Class of 2004" and "Batch of 2004"? I have a feeling that one means the students who joined the university in 2004 and the other means those who graduated in 2004. Is ...
1
vote
2answers
158 views

How to name a routine interruption in the work of some system that is deliberately done in order to find some possible weak points in the system?

How would you name a routine interruption in the work of some system (let's say a subway or a railroad) that is deliberately done by the workers on a regular basis in order to find some possible weak ...
14
votes
2answers
14k views

Is “authentification” a real word?

My professor used the word authentification in a lecture. I have always used authentication. Is it a real word or is authentication the correct term?
4
votes
5answers
3k views

What's the difference between a tune and a melody?

What's the difference between a tune and a melody?
3
votes
3answers
392 views

Does the word “evolution” connote “upgrade”?

Does 'evolution' means 'upgrade' ? 'downgrade' or just 'gradient'?
8
votes
4answers
178k views

Which one is correct, “best wishes to you” or “best wishes for you”?

Which one is correct, "best wishes to you" or "best wishes for you"?
4
votes
4answers
5k views

Which is correct — “I told you” or “I said you”?

I often hear people using "I said you" in Asia, but people in America use "I told you". Is there a difference between the usage of said and told? And to be more specific which is correct ...
0
votes
1answer
255 views

Question on usage on 'Rating Yourself'

Assuming you are the interviewer and would you ask the candidate: How would you rate yourself on the scale from 1 to 10? What would you rate yourself on the scale of 1 to 10? Which ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

vocabulary question: manners vs. mannerisms

"It is a good mannerism to reply for a message". Is this sentence right? If so then why? Which one should be used in the above line — "good mannerism" or "good manners"?
6
votes
3answers
1k views

“Do it very quickly” vs “do it ASAP”

What is the difference between these phrases? Please, do it very quickly, since the deadline is approaching. and Please, do it ASAP, because the deadline is approaching.
5
votes
3answers
23k views

Which is the correct preposition for the end of “pride myself” (is it “on”, “at”, or “in”)?

as in "I pride myself on my ability to speak Klingon and Romulan in the appropriate accents." Which is the correct preposition for the end of that expression?
2
votes
7answers
9k views

“Situated” vs. “located”

I found the following example in my vocabulary: The town is situated on a plateau high up among the mountains of the north. Can I replace situated with located for the example above? What's the ...
0
votes
1answer
155 views

Periodical vs Issue?

I found issues were used on some websites like "$1 an issue". (Some magazines.) But I found another word periodical was used on my vocabulary book as follows: The periodical is published every ...
3
votes
2answers
381 views

Can you *donate* to a non-charitable cause?

I just had someone insist that a donation can only be to a charitable cause or organization; otherwise, the word contribution should be used. When I objected to "contribution" on the grounds that it ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

Is the plural of the electronic mouse “mouses” or “mice”?

Is the plural of that device that you plug into your computer mouses or mice? Which of these is correct? I bought some wireless optical mouses for my colleagues at work. I bought some ...
3
votes
3answers
293 views

“Taiwan visa” or “Taiwanese visa”?

Which way is correct? Is there any rule for such cases?
6
votes
1answer
13k views

Difference between the use of “for” and “of”

I am always confused by the difference between the use of for and of in cases like these: Principal component analysis of microarray data. Principal component analysis for microarray data. ...
5
votes
3answers
24k views

Is “I also don't know” less correct than “I don't know either”?

When do you use "I don't know either" and when "I also don't know" (or any other verb instead of "know")? I've been taught that "I also don't know" is not as correct as "I don't know either" - just ...
12
votes
2answers
7k views

Can “due to” and “because of ” be used interchangeably?

Is it fine to use due to in place of because of ? How about the other way around? Are any of these sentences ungrammatical? He was lost because of the storm. He was lost due to the storm. He lost ...
5
votes
2answers
9k views

“Studying PhD at the university” or “studying PhD in the university”?

Which of these two sentences is correct: I am studying PhD at the university. I am studying PhD in the university. Should I use "at" or "in"? Or is there no difference?
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Difficulty v. difficulties

Which form of "difficulty" should I opt for in the following sentence: They have immense difficulties easily accessing the texts. or They have immense difficulty easily accessing the texts. ...
5
votes
1answer
4k views

“Answer to my question” or “answer on my question”?

What's the right usage: an answer to my question or on my question?
11
votes
6answers
2k views

“Fluids” versus “liquids”?

What is the difference between fluid and liquid? I'm thinking of this in the context of drink plenty of fluids.
3
votes
6answers
7k views

“Good at” or “Good in” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “At” vs. “in” before verb "He is good in painting" or "He is good at painting" — which one is correct?
16
votes
1answer
5k views

Words pertaining to the senses and the corresponding disabilities

I need help on finding words relating to the senses/perception. I mean this in a neuronic/biological or philosophy-of-mind kind of way. A word for... pertaining to the senses (Is it sensory?) ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

'Heavy Traffic' or 'Lot of Traffic'?

Is it appropriate to say 'Heavy Traffic'? I am referring to traffic as in roads and vehicles in this context. Is using 'lot of traffic' more appropriate?
3
votes
7answers
825 views

“On the cloud” or “in the cloud”?

I would use this title for a blog about cloud computing. Which is correct — "on the cloud" or "in the cloud"?
13
votes
1answer
16k views

Which is correct: “you and I” or “you and me”?

I was told the correct usage is for example: "My wife and me" but I hear often "I and my wife" or "my wife and I". Google gives 34M results for "My wife and I" and 909K results for "My wife and me" ...
2
votes
4answers
349 views

What is this Dad going to say?

Here is a situation: Dad is talking to his 5-year-old son while watching TV: Dad: I really like this movie. Son: But I don't like this movie. Dad: I am a bit hungry. Son: But I am not hungry. ...
0
votes
2answers
25k views

When to use “is” and “was” for thing that has happened?

I've found some sentences that seem odd for me such as, "She is married" instead of "She was married" or "This transaction is approved" instead of "This transaction was approved" I want to know which ...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

Difference between “undertone” and “overtone”

Is there any meaningful difference between the terms undertone and overtone with regard to an utterance in the sense of an implicit meaning?
3
votes
1answer
12k views

Difference between “picture” and “photo”

When should I use one or the other?
5
votes
4answers
618 views

Has “utilise” lost its meaning in America?

My understanding is that "utilise" means to use an object for a task for which it was not intended. However, in American English, it seems that "utilize" is synonymous with "use", and it seems that ...
5
votes
3answers
11k views

What is the correct usage? “Ever so often” or “Every so often”

A colleague asked to check in with me every couple of weeks. I would like to respond that it would be wonderful if they checked in ever so often. But, I don't believe that sounds correct. How should I ...