This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

0
votes
2answers
279 views

A water circle of few radius is around the park

In the following image: Do you see the water in a few feet radius around a land? How do you describe this? Let's assume that the land is a park and there is no fountain. Can I express it this way: ...
4
votes
6answers
198 views

Word for relative movement of inner and outer

I want to describe the movement or position of an inner material inside an outer sheath, as the inner moves through the outer. Can anyone think of some kind of verb, spatial preposition or any other ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

example vs. exemplary

I am not a native speaker. Looking at the dictionary both sentences could be correct. I think in this example "example feature" is the right choice: These two example features are both ...
2
votes
3answers
71 views

I can see us agreeing on many points “in the article” or “from the article”?

I want to provide a reader with a link to an article and say that we would agree on a lot of points therein. What's the best way to state that, and which of these versions is correct? I can see us ...
2
votes
3answers
44k views

Is it appropriate to use 'eagerly' while ending a formal e-mail

Nowadays, I always use the following phrase when I am ending formal email; I eagerly await for your response. Regards, I've seen this phrase somewhere, kind-of a formal e-mail and I am ...
4
votes
3answers
9k views

“for the sake of” | synonyms

Are there any other ways of writing the following while keeping the same meaning? for the sake of I have used it so much in my essay, so I am searching a thing which gives the same meaning.
0
votes
0answers
38 views

Is there any difference between “crenellations” and “battlements”? [duplicate]

Both these terms seem to refer to the jagged parapets you see on classic medieval castle towers. Merriam-Webster defines "battlement" like this: a parapet with open spaces that surmounts a wall ...
0
votes
3answers
68 views

English word for “Zeitgeschehen” (present happenings)

The German word Zeitgeschehen is a noun that describes present happenings in general. Zeitgeschehen is most commonly used as the name of a section in media. Society, culture, news, … are put together ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

amongst and amidst and other words ending in -st

Came across this article earlier today, and now I'm questioning everything- Are "amongst" and "amidst" synonymous as the article states? Also, rather than possessing the "excrescent -st suffix", ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

populate vs. autopopulate

In technical writing, when describing how the software performs the action of completing a field on a screen, do you describe the field as being 'automatically populated' or just 'populated'? Does ...
1
vote
1answer
79 views

Is there any difference between “it's dead to me” and “it's dead for me?”

I read iTunes Is Dead to Me and was curious if there is any difference between saying "iTunes is dead to me" and "iTunes is dead for me?"
14
votes
3answers
2k views

What do rodents do?

I wonder if there is a English verb to express the way rodents (rats, mice, etc.) bite on something they are trying to eat or bite. In Portuguese we have the verb roer which comes from roedor which ...
0
votes
3answers
83 views

What is the UK-English Equivalent for “band-aid?”

What is the UK-English equivalent for "band-aid?" That is, the bandage one puts over cuts and the like?
0
votes
1answer
26 views

“metaphoric” versus “metaphorical”

Is there a difference between the words "metaphoric" and "metaphorical"? I'm reading an essay in which "metaphoric" is used. But that sounded a little odd to me. "Metaphorical" sounds better. ...
0
votes
2answers
496 views

Belong to Vs. Pertain to

I would like to know if the meaning of belong to conform the meaning of pertain to. If no, what is the difference and when each one of them is more suitable? Update Well according to my search ...
1
vote
1answer
27 views

Do harbour cranes lay dormant?

I am trying to construct 'alternate text' for a photograph I am submitting for evaluation. The photo is in the 'cityscape' category and depicts the harbour at dawn with cranes that are normally busy - ...
0
votes
1answer
81 views

Adding vs Contrasting: meaning of the required linker

I have a complicated text, but I built two sentences with the main idea. I'd like to use either a) or b) as the last sentence. We prepared ourselves so that "some stuff" is probably available, but ...
-1
votes
5answers
275 views

What is more natural: 'people like you' or 'person as you'?

It's nice to have people like you here. It's nice to have people as you here. It's nice to have persons like you here. It's nice to have persons as you here. I always say there is ...
6
votes
8answers
680 views

Word to describe a person who decides what to eat amongst a group of people? [closed]

The situation is as follows: After a college alumni event, old classmates are all sitting in a roundtable to discuss which restaurant they should go to eat that night. There are total of 8 guys and 8 ...
1
vote
2answers
135 views

The difference between 'transfer' and 'transit' in the context of airports and train stations

There appears to be a fine shade of meaning between the words 'transfer' and 'transit' in the domain of airports and train stations, possibly sea ports as well. Consider this typical usage ...
0
votes
6answers
130 views

Antonym for perfectionist.

A perfectionist is: a person who wants everything to be perfect and demands the highest standards possible. (Cambridge Dict.) What noun could be used to refer to the opposite of the ...
5
votes
2answers
12k views

What is the difference between “noun”, “proper noun”, and “name”?

Do noun and name carry a different meaning? If there are any differences, are those differences specific to a context?
-1
votes
1answer
42 views

The meaning of this sentence [closed]

"A love of the outdoors runs in the family." I don't know which meaning of "run " I should choose. Please help me explain the meaning of this sentence.
0
votes
3answers
326 views

What is an adjective for multiple things originating from the same source?

I feel like there should be a word for this, and it seems like it's on the tip of my tongue, but I just can't think of it. Is there an adjective for when a number of things all originate from the ...
0
votes
2answers
55 views

complex words indication

Splicing factors have oncogenic properties. However, their expression patterns and practical priority in gastric cancer and the difference of them between gastric cancer and colorectal cancers are ...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

Alternatives to “Or so I thought”?

That chair was very sturdy, or so I thought. "Or so I thought" means the previous phrase is wrong after a while of consideration. (or something similar) Is there any term/words that can replace ...
2
votes
2answers
375 views

Referring to people from different parts of United Kingdom

I see four people in front of me. One is from Wales, one is from Scotland, one is from England and one is from Northern Ireland. I can say about each one "He is Scottish/Welsh/English". But, how do I ...
27
votes
6answers
2k views

What do you call this segment of road between the lane and an exit?

Circled in red. Is there an official name for the portion of road between the road and an exit is called?
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Which determiner to use with degrees: “a” or “my/his/her/your”?

Examples: She has a PhD in biophysics. She has her PhD in biophysics. And: He has a black belt in judo. He has his black belt in judo.
-1
votes
1answer
64 views

“I remember a time” vs. “I remember the time”

I remember a time she was working as a waitress. I remember the time she was working as a waitress. Which of these is correct? And why?
30
votes
7answers
5k views

Word for a software bug that occurs again after having fixed it?

What's the word for a software bug that reoccurs after being fixed? I'm embarking on some test-driven development (TDD) for a project, and I want to use the right term but have forgotten the word. ...
13
votes
4answers
12k views

“Baggage” versus “luggage”

I have the feeling that luggage is more closely associated with vacation travel, whereas baggage is for general transportation. Or... are they just exact synonyms?
1
vote
2answers
6k views

“Have been through” or “have gone through”?

I don't know whether been or gone would be better in this sentence: I have some long-lasting memories in my mind, such as memorable overseas trips that I have been through. I have some ...
0
votes
3answers
60 views

What's the difference between “increased” and “increasing”?

What's the difference between "at an increased rate" and "at an increasing rate". It seems to me both of these are correct and no difference. Am I right?
2
votes
0answers
345 views

would you ask someone to drive safe or to drive safely? [duplicate]

When someone is going to drive their car somewhere, I always used to say "drive safely" to them. Recently I was told I should say "drive safe." Which is correct? So it's about when to use the word ...
18
votes
3answers
43k views
4
votes
3answers
1k views

“Prices of” vs “prices for”

I came across two different sentences, from The Wall Street Journal, both containing the word "prices" but with different prepositions, "of" and "for". Here are the two sentences. Audi Cuts ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

“Curious as to who” vs. “curious of who”

I'm curious as to who you are. I'm curious of who you are. The person is anonymous and I'm just wondering who it is.
1
vote
1answer
392 views

Is “cause” instead of “because” becoming Standard English?

Nowadays, I'm seeing a drastic increase in usage of cause in place of because, especially in written English. People are in such a hurry, that a statement like below passes off like Standard English: ...
4
votes
3answers
995 views

Is 'set phrase' a set phrase?

Some words or phrases have 'special' meaning beyond the combination of constituent parts. For example: 'White House' is the white house where the US president lives. 'black board' is where you ...
1
vote
3answers
68 views

What would be an exact word to describe taking solace in other's misfortune, knowing one is not alone in facing it?

Schadenfreude implies deriving 'pleasure' in other's misfortune but what I am looking for is a word where one derives comfort that one's misfortune is faced by others as well. For instance, knowing at ...
0
votes
3answers
114 views

“I feel stressed” or “I feel stressful”? Which one is correct? [closed]

I say "I feel stressful" but my teacher, a native speaker of English, says that I should say "I feel stressed". Both stressful and stressed are adjective. Which is correct, I feel stressed or I ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

How to express the idea of the company I am working for and not my company?

Ok, English is my second language, and sometimes I have the following confusing situation. When on the train, I told a friend of mine that “My company is not doing well these days. By my company I ...
2
votes
4answers
79 views

Which of “I’d rather it be/were you” is/are correct?

Which of these is correct and why? I’d rather it be you. I’d rather it were you.
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Which term expresses ”a generation of graduates who graduated the first course of a college”?

Suppose business college A first debuted in 2000. It opened its first business course in 2000, and the course will finish in 2004. In 2001 it opened a second course, and students who enrolled in 2001 ...
-1
votes
2answers
30 views

“Table of Contents” vs. “Contents”

I'm a student and about to write my first scientific paper in English. I'm currently not sure how to name the "table of contents". The dictionary says that "Contents" is more popular, but I have seen ...
0
votes
3answers
60 views

“Sponsoring” without implying funding

I am trying to replace the term "sponsored" in the following context, with a better term that does not imply receiving funds or support of any kind. Project X was sponsored by Company Y. Any ...
3
votes
10answers
259 views

Word for a given situation

In the spirit of The Big Bang TV show titles I am looking for a word to use in a particular situation. First, there's a joke that sets up the scenario. 2 guys camping. They are barefoot by the fire. ...
3
votes
1answer
204 views

Is there an adjective for people who prefer seeing diagrams rather than reading words?

I have a friend who prefer seeing diagrams rather than reading words. Is there an adjective to represent his character?
3
votes
4answers
8k views

Which is correct: 'Drafty' or 'draughty'?

I have been changing 'drafty' for 'draughty', or because of my confusion, removing the word altogether while subbing online articles. I'd appreciate guidance on which term is correct for UK English. ...