This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning.

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7
votes
3answers
1k views

Better term for “intellectual jokes”

What can you call a joke, pun, or anything funny that likely needs intelligence to get? All I can come up with is intellectual jokes; is there another word for this? A one-word answer would be great. ...
11
votes
3answers
7k views

Is “triple” the proper counterpart of pair when describing a group of three items?

I'm writing a tech doc and this question bothers me, though I know it should be simple. I know I should say "A pair of [Key, Value]", but when I have something like "A ____ of [Key, Value, Flag]", ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

What to call a date field that represents when another date field was entered? [closed]

I have a date field named "Initial Forecast Date" and I need another date field that represents when the user entered "Initial Forecast Date". What would be the most appropriate name for this field? ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Goal-driven vs. goal-oriented

What is differences between "goal-driven" and "goal-oriented"? E.g. This chapter proposes modeling perception as a goal-driven planning pro- cess and considers how to guide the application of ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“Much as” vs “Much like”

"Much as they had done with her..." "Much like they had done with her..." I was told that the use of "much like" in the second sentence is grammatically wrong. Any explanation is greatly ...
1
vote
1answer
78 views

Is there sch a thing in English as “other payment for use of land” that is not, in the broad sense, “rent”?

I ask this as an inquiry into the validity of the logic behind the currently accepted answer to Do you still pay 10x the dice when getting the chance card that takes you to the nearest utility if the ...
23
votes
5answers
7k views

What is the “‑cide” word for killing one’s husband?

We have uxoricide for killing one’s wife, but what is the equivalent term for killing one’s husband? Similarly, what is the husband-specific equivalent for the adjective uxorial?
5
votes
7answers
2k views

Is there a word to describe a claim that cannot be disproved because the situation will never occur?

I'm looking for a way to describe a statement or claim made by a person that can't be disproved purely on the basis that the situation itself will never occur (or is highly unlikely to). For ...
8
votes
2answers
26k views

Difference between “recently” and “lately”

I have posted a topic using this sentence: I have picked some fictions to read lately. RegDwight edited this sentence to: I have recently picked up several works of fiction and begun to read ...
148
votes
19answers
43k views

What is a feminine version of 'guys'?

I commonly use the word 'guys' to refer to a group of males colloquially. It's colloquial but not rude, off putting, condescending, patronizing (though I wouldn't use it with a group of men at a board ...
26
votes
6answers
13k views

Types of things vs. types of thing

When speaking precisely or technically, one would say that "Homo erectus and homo sapiens are two species of hominid" rather than "Homo erectus and homo sapiens are two species of hominids." The ...
1
vote
4answers
3k views

What do you call someone who knows multiple programming languages?

Someone who knows multiple languages is called polyglot or multilingual (There can be nuances between two words also.). I'm not sure if we can apply these terms to someone who knows multiple ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

offer for vs. offer to

Which of the two sentences is correct? He refused the organization's offer for help. He refused the organization's offer to help. Did a few searches online, and I found that both are widely used. ...
0
votes
4answers
67 views

One word synonymous to display of power

I need one single word that is synonymous to "bold display of power/might/hold/domination in some place" .It would be much appreciated if someone can provide me a noun otherwise a verb will also do ...
5
votes
3answers
34k views

Proper use of “out to lunch”, “out for lunch” and “out at lunch”

Recently a co-worker and I debated the proper use of "out to lunch". The argument stemmed from conversation over the appropriate preposition to use, and became particularly heated when we tried to ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

Difference between “Discriminant”, “Discriminative” and “Discriminating”

Let us assume I am writing some technical CS stuff, and I want to talk about "features" of something that discriminate something else. Translating from my native language (French), I would use the ...
0
votes
1answer
929 views

Is “in assistance with” correct?

I have drafted a letter containing the statement: In assistance with the team, the company registered sales amounting to $x in 2014-15 Is "In assistance with the team" a correct use of ...
1
vote
1answer
127 views

melancholically or melancholic

In the example below, should I use melancholically or melancholic? Are either fine to use? "the music begins playing melancholically/melancholic over the dancefloor." Thanks for any input, much ...
3
votes
1answer
76 views

“Connected by” vs “Connected with” vs “Connected to”

I want to know the difference and when to use which construction. For instance: The island and the city are connected with a bridge or The island and the city are connected by a bridge ? ...
8
votes
2answers
7k views

What's the difference between something that it is “connected” and “interconnected?”

I always thought that inter means that the elements I'm talking about has a relation with another one. The word "connected" already has this meaning. So when I read "interconnected" I think about: ...
31
votes
8answers
10k views

When talking to American clients, should I say “smoothie” or “milkshake”?

We have a client visit planned to our service center (in India) and I am in-charge of Food and Beverages for our client's entire itinerary. I am writing to my client's Travel coordinator(an American) ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

Should I use 'leitmotifs', the plural of leitmotif, in academic English?

Should I, in an scientific book, use the word 'leitmotifs', the plural of leitmotif? Some dictionaries seem to know it in the plural form, but does it sound very weird or massively pretentious to the ...
6
votes
2answers
18k views

“Starting with” vs. “starting from”

I would like to ask about the difference between the two phrases starting with and starting from. Take the following two sentences for example: Please give me all the names starting with A. ...
3
votes
1answer
42 views

Human vs Person

Imagine a database to keep clients' data. Clients can be either humans/persons or companies. For human/person clients there is additional data to be stored, like gender, age. What word works better in ...
4
votes
1answer
8k views

What is the difference between the words negative and negatory?

What is the difference between the words negative and negatory? I looked up the definitions here and they are pretty much the same.
0
votes
0answers
41 views

Use of 'being' at the end of the sentence

Is it right if I write the sentence as follows: I started my graduate research on Sensing, dynamic spectrum access and sharing being the main focus. Or should I write it like this: I ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Can “trusty” and “trustworthy” be used interchangeably?

Such as: "I'm going back to the clubhouse; there are trusty people there." "I'm going back to the clubhouse; there are trustworthy people there." Trusty Definition: having served for a long ...
14
votes
4answers
20k views

Which is correct: “home in” or “hone in”?

I've heard people say "Home in on something", but I've also heard others say "Hone in on something". Which is the correct expression, and what is the etymology of these?
2
votes
4answers
5k views

Which one is correct? “Look here” or “Look at here”?

Between the following two phrases: "Look here" "Look at here" which one is correct? Is it advisable to use "at" in this case?
0
votes
1answer
184 views

“such as yourselves” or “such as you”

Would it be Without patrons such as yourselves, we could not have this event. OR Without patrons such as you, we could not have this event.
3
votes
4answers
131 views

Which adjective is better to describe 'weather' and 'climate' that they are neither cold nor hot?

There are some adjectives which are used to describe weather, such as hot, cold, wet, dry, fine, nice, etc. I think we can use 'mild' (relatively warm for winter or cool for summer). Or we can use ...
2
votes
1answer
69 views

Which one is common: “Diagnostic” or “Diagnostics”

I'm translating the interface texts of an industrial control panel software and got stuck on this one. The module I'm referring to has some lists containing the sensors and switches for the digital ...
0
votes
2answers
55 views

Informal of “Fixing problem is in progress” [closed]

We have comical picture which we show when video signal is lost. The text below should be sort of that: "No signal. Fixing is in progress". But in more informal way. One alternative is: "No signal. We ...
8
votes
3answers
2k views

Opposite of benefit of the doubt?

"Benefit of the doubt" is a standard phrase in English and is a very useful one in formal discussions. Is there an equivalent expression to denote the opposite of it, formal or informal? For example: ...
1
vote
2answers
32 views

Reform vs. Re-form

Does the word "reform" refer to something forming again (the nucleus reformed) or to something like "social reform"? I wanted to know because my biology textbook refers to the nucleus forming again ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

give an exact number

I heard on the following web site that one person says "* give an exact number.." http://loe.org/shows/shows.html?programID=12-P13-00043 I wonder whether or not the "give" can be used as a verb in a ...
0
votes
2answers
36 views

Is there a term or expression for certain terms that we have lain in a dictionary that we consider useless?

I've researched and I found out that "Pleonasm" is not what I'm referring to. So it's not that. For example: The term prognosticate -"To prognosticate weather conditions is not a simple matter." ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Should 'in' be used in this sentence or 'on'? What is the grammar behind it?

We will imprint your design, logo or message in any color on any shape, to make your unique air freshener. In this sentence is "on any shape" correct or will it be "in any shape"? And what is ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

What do you call someone who builds fences

What do you call someone who builds fences other than maybe "fence builder"? Is there a specialized name for that - maybe even archaic? Example: A smithy smith works with metal (Correction @Chris ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Should I use “internal” or “domestic”? [closed]

Should I use "internal" or "domestic"? And where? What word should be applied to internal/domestic market?
-3
votes
3answers
41 views

Is this headline concise and clear enough? [closed]

I want to say it like im 5. Essentially, where a 5 year old could be able to comprehend the message. I tried to simplify this line, but I feel it's still a bit complicated. Making deliveries ...
1
vote
4answers
86 views

What is a good word to describe someone that is good at playing with others gullibility [closed]

What is a word that shows some being good at playing with someone gullibility?
0
votes
1answer
41 views

“conversation-partner” and “conversation-mate”

Is it appropriate to say that the person I'm having a conversation with is my conversation-partner, or do I have to say conversational partner? And if "conversation-partner" is Ok, what about ...
11
votes
2answers
8k views

“Sign in”, “signin” or “sign-in”

Which is correct: sign in, signin or sign-in when used as a noun and also as a verb?
0
votes
5answers
84 views

Is there a word that refers to both caller and callee in telecommunication? [closed]

Is there a word that can refer to both caller and callee as in calling party and called party in telecommunication?
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Members of a set that will probably have a quality

Consider these statements. What I want to convey is that most Alphas will die, that Tom, Dick, and Harry as Alphas are very likely to die, but it's not certain; and some Betas will die. (We already ...
0
votes
2answers
65 views

“Drink up”: lost in translation: how can it be regained?

Articles on this issue periodically appear in literary essays. There are pros and cons, and the issue lives on, unresolved. Here's the problem: Translators of Russian classic novels into English ...
5
votes
3answers
333 views

Soft winter OR mild winter?

I was doing some online tests that are supposed to be useful for the TOEFL and I was confused (although I gave a correct answer) with the following multiple-choice question: The meteorologists say ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

What preposition is used with Weekend [duplicate]

When is Pat going to call you? I' am expecting him to call sometime ______ the weekend. a)in b)on c)over
1
vote
2answers
7k views

What is a word similar to FYI but not objective/neutral

FYI can be used in an email to inform the person reading the email about some information. It is comfortable using this between peers. But what if the mail is intended to inform someone higher in the ...