This tag is for questions about choosing the best word from a given selection for a particular context or meaning.

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41
votes
5answers
2k views

Flora, fauna, robot

Are there any terms for referring to robot-kind, as flora refers to plants and fauna to animals? I'm looking for a word that would fit in with flora and fauna, so if it derives from Latin or Roman ...
-2
votes
0answers
26 views

Argentine or Argentina- Argentineans or Argentinians [duplicate]

I regualrly connect online with a lot of people from the South American state Argentina. It appears I might be offending them. The dictionaries seem to confuse me on this: Argentine or Argentina ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

Is “He's looking this way! Get away before he sees you!” correct?

Is the sentence correct, or would I need to reword it as "He's starting to look this way! Get away before he sees you!" In my first sentence, the person is in the process of turning his head to look ...
6
votes
3answers
14k views

Is it correct to say “I feel painful” to mean “I feel pain”?

Is it correct to say "I feel painful" to mean "I feel pain"? Please note that I mean only those cases, in which the phrase is a complete sentence. There should be no words after the last word in each ...
0
votes
2answers
63 views

Word meaning both create and update?

I'd like to know if someone has a better word than these (authored, produced) , for both creating and updating something. Context: I'm a software developer and I'm trying to think of a clever way to ...
1
vote
2answers
35 views

Contribute vs assist [closed]

How is it correct to say - I contributed in your achievements VS I assisted in your achievements. I will explain what I want to say - I dont way to say that I help, because a man can consider that I ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

bite off a fingertip [closed]

Anatomically, or colloquially, is the fingertip the whole part from the joint to the tip, or can it be just a tiny bit of flesh from the tip? I'm tempted to write "caused him to accidentally bite off ...
0
votes
1answer
104 views

Until, till, as long as

I will not go to the garden until my mother allows me I will not go to the garden as long as my mother doesn't allow me I will not go to the garden till my mother allows me: Are these sentences the ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Word for liking and not liking something at the same time? [duplicate]

What's a word for the feeling of liking something, but not liking it at the same time? I love the way the Spanish speak, but it bothers me at the same time. I've looked through and dictionaries asked ...
4
votes
3answers
96 views

Usage of “well-intended” vs. “well-intentioned”

It seems to me that the adjective well-intended is properly applied to an action, whereas well-intentioned is properly applied to an actor. For example, suppose John observes that Mary's car is dirty ...
0
votes
3answers
51 views

Difference between “I can do that” and “that works for me” [closed]

Is there a difference between these two? Which one sounds more polite? Thank you.
2
votes
2answers
156 views

“Homosexual” or “Gay and Lesbian”?

I have faced a problem with my writing which I could really do with some clarification on. My question applies to both British and American English (which is fairly standard on the internet). ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

“Abusive” vs “invective” vs “vituperative”

What is the different between abusive, invective and vituperative? In the following definitions from Oxford, the last two both contain abusive, which makes me hard to distinguish them. Abusive: ...
1
vote
10answers
957 views

Single word antonym of “censorship”

What is a single word antonym of censorship? Freedom of speech is too long. I would like to be able to contrast it like: ignorance vs knowledge submission vs defiance oppression vs ...
19
votes
5answers
31k views

“Hooker”, “whore”, “prostitute”, when to use which?

"Hooker", "whore", and "prostitute" all mean whore; what are the differences between them?
0
votes
4answers
203 views

What is the proper term for describing all 50 states in the USA, without including territories etc

The 48 mainland state are referred to as the "contiguous united states", I can't seem to find the word for "All 50 states, including Hawaii and Alaska, not including Guam and Puerto Rico". I can't ...
2
votes
1answer
134 views

Possible Interpretations of “Log”

While doing some research I ran across the following passage. I know what "shackles' are, what might a "log" be? “It is very seldom that a boy deserves both a log and a shackle at the same time! ...
6
votes
4answers
25k views

“In the last 3 months” vs “in the past 3 months”

What's the difference between in the last 3 months and in the past 3 months if there is any?
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Wording for error message when deleting an item [duplicate]

When displaying a message to a user from our software, is it better to say: "Choose the case note that you want to delete, and then try again." or "Choose the case note you want to delete, and ...
4
votes
4answers
114 views

Word or phrase to use “when you told a story/situation and it happend you later”

English is NOT my primary language . In my language we have a phrase to use in this kind of situation . You were telling a story or a situation to your friends and later it happens you . For eg : ...
3
votes
1answer
91 views

Genetic condition that leaves open gaps between teeth?

You would think this would be something a dentist knows. I've asked scores of dentists this very question and no one has an answer. It's got to have a name. It's fairly common. The teeth don't ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Cadaver/corpse/body for a dead human body

Currently listening to the audio book "Digital Fortress", I came across the word "cadaver" in reference to a dead human body for the first time. Somehow it struck me as a degrading way of referring to ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

Is it correct to say ''you ARE to be back here before dark'' [duplicate]

I'm reading a novel and a character says this line:''you ARE to be back here before dark'' but I could not find this usage of the verb to be in my dictionary, so here I ask you if this is informal ...
49
votes
13answers
9k views

What's a less offensive substitute for “rep-whores”?

This is a frequently thrown-around term on Internet forums in general and Stack Exchange specifically. Although it conveys a lot of meaning, I'd much prefer a phrase with a less offensive origin. ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Permutation as an adjective?

"My studies showcase special emphasis on cumulative recursive [permutative?] effects of one's hydration, nutrition, self-image, and general cognitive ability." Basically, each of the four items ...
0
votes
4answers
468 views

Should “afford” be transitive in “my chosen path has afforded (to) me unique opportunities”?

In a college essay I wrote a sentence that reads: Sixteen years later, my chosen path has afforded to me unique opportunities, limitless learning, and potential for growth. Should I use the verb ...
34
votes
14answers
5k views

Feminism being referred to as equality for all, as opposed to equality for women [closed]

In a recent debate with a colleague, a self-proclaimed feminist, she described feminists as seeking equality for all, and not simply just women. I thought that this was inherently wrong considering ...
2
votes
2answers
31 views

What is a “Select Committee” in the context of an 1833 English report?

I'm French, and I'm currently working on a historical report on English society in the early 19th century for a school exam. I'm working from an English book, and I have a translation problem. I ...
0
votes
2answers
47 views

drawn or drawn in

I have a figure and some edges are plotted for convenience. So I want to write a caption like "Auxiliary edges are drawn in" But I'm confused about the in. As a non native speaker, drawn in ...
-1
votes
4answers
78 views

A synonym for “different” [closed]

I am not a native English speaker and currently writing on a scientific journal. In my paper, I want to explain a fundamental difference when comparing my idea with other methods. I need a synonym for ...
2
votes
1answer
137 views

Is the following sentence odd? “I find them comic”

But this is the Old Bailey. He's a Lord — or she's a Lady. You may find the wigs and the ceremonial ways that people refer to each other strange or intimidating. I was advised. But I don't find ...
1
vote
4answers
9k views

“Cool water” vs. “cold water” [closed]

We often use "cool water". But can we use "cool water" or "cold water"? Which is correct? Examples: I drink cool water only. People always like cool water. In the above examples, ...
-5
votes
1answer
813 views

“To have to” vs. “should” [closed]

I wonder which one to choose here: My father should drive carefully when it’s raining. My father has to drive carefully when it’s raining.
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Would an “affector” be appropriate for an event driver?

I'm trying to come up with a better word to describe a "driver" or "conditional"; basically, the name of an object or event which is a trigger for something else. Would it be appropriate to say that ...
3
votes
2answers
85 views

Clasping arms when cold: how does one say that?

How does one say in English when, as a reaction to cold, a person crosses their arms, grabbing their own shoulders? It is a very common gesture, not shrugging as "I don't care", but to keep the cold ...
3
votes
2answers
457 views

A fatal accident vs a fateful accident [closed]

fatal/adjective/causing death. fateful/adjective/ having far-reaching and often disastrous consequences or implications. My team-leader survived a life-threatening injury, when back to work, an ...
8
votes
3answers
2k views

Is there such a thing as a “pre-anniversary”? Or a better word?

I suddenly find myself trying to describe a date that's an exact number of years before a scheduled event and I can't think of a better word to describe it than "pre-anniversary" or maybe even ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

“private reason” vs “personal reason”

Someone turned down my invitation for visit to our university for some private reasons. I am not sure what he meant by that. The situation is like he used to work for a company and there might be a ...
2
votes
5answers
12k views

“Old days” or “olden days”?

Sometimes I use the phrase "back in the old days". I was recently in a class where the trainer kept using the phrase "olden days." Which usage is acceptable?
1
vote
2answers
75 views

What is the word for what an applicant applies to?

If you are applying to a school you are an "applicant". What is the word for the thing you're applying to? Similar to the sentence "the stalker stalks the stalkee", what would be in the blank in the ...
1
vote
6answers
132 views

Word for flaws associated with an overly rule-based cognitive style

I am looking for a word which describes the psychology behind multiple related behaviors. I feel that it's at the tip of my tongue, but I can't seem to get it. I want to describe this person as ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

When to use 'degree of' versus 'level of' in urban planning

Should we say, in urban planning, a certain level of compact development, or a certain degree of compact development?
-1
votes
1answer
107 views

Is there a way to specify a person just by hair color? [closed]

You can say: "Look, there is a blonde woman." or "Look, there is a gray woman." If I am talking about hair color. But at the moment I say brown or black it is about skin color. And red just ...
1
vote
2answers
65 views

Is there a word that describes “ranking up a position”?

For example, say a programmer. A junior programmer "xxx"s into a senior programmer.. Ranks up doesn't sound that well, and I'm looking for a single word (if any)
0
votes
1answer
46 views

How would you translate “Kommandostab”, “command bar”, from German?

How would you translate "Kommandostab" from German? The literate translation is "command bar", this object was used to give orders to the army. Full sentence: "In der rechten Hand hält er einen ...
6
votes
2answers
191 views

What is 'pink' and what is 'magenta'? [closed]

A major political row has broken out in Britain over the colour of this bus. [Image from The Daily Telegraph] The bus is sponsored by the Labour Party to take high-flying female politicians ...
0
votes
4answers
56 views

Survey Question

I have drafted an internal employee survey focused around "inclusion". One of the questions has been vetoed incorrect by my supervisor, while I maintain that the original is grammatically correct. ...
2
votes
2answers
17k views

“No more”, “no longer”, “not anymore”

You love me no more. You no longer love me. You don't love me anymore. How are these three sentences different from one another? I use not anymore more often than the others. But once I ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Which is the correct word to use here: “consensus” or “majority”?

I was just told that: What you call a consensus isn't a consensus, but a majority. He implied that it was not a consensus because a few disagreed with the decision made. From my understanding, ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

The 'Double That', rephrase or go with it? [closed]

There's a previous question here: How do you handle "that that"? The double "that" problem I'm translating a book, and found myself producing this following sentence: Parting ...