This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning.

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1
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1answer
35 views

What is the difference between “acquisitional”, “acquisitive”, and “acquisitory”?

I am actually a native speaker, but this one threw me. "Acquisitory" seems to be associated with avarice/greed, possibly specifically for material goods. "Acquisitive" also seems to be related to ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

What is the meaning of “reset” in this sentence?

What was the meaning of "reset" in this letter? "change"?, "setting again?" , “setting back to the original state" We did not "reset the time" in these animals. We put them into an environment ...
5
votes
4answers
175 views

What’s a person who borrows something but won’t return it?

I cannot find the right words or expression or idiom to describe a person who borrows something from someone but will not return it to its owner. Also, I would like to know the word that describes a ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

When to use “gather” versus “hunt”?

Is there a good and fast rule for when to the verb ‘gather’ versus ‘hunt’ for venturing out for food? I always thought that plants were gathered and animals were hunted. However ‘mushroom hunting’ is ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

What is the difference between apologize and apologise and how could use it in suitable place? [duplicate]

I am confused every time when I am using these words, then using any one of them without knowing its difference. Can anyone help me how could I use these words in appropriate situation?
0
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1answer
58 views

What's a more appropriate word than verbatim or literal in this context?

The XML file is being transcribed verbatim to generate the form on the web page. Perhaps literal fits better than verbatim, as the former denotes a looser correlation (in my opinion) than the ...
0
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1answer
38 views

Lexical collocation of “former”

Imagine that you are the president of a company, and there was another person playing the same role before you. How should I describe the former president using the expression like "He was the ...
0
votes
1answer
68 views

Reset = “setting again” or to “setting back to the original state”?

In the OED dictionary, "Reset" has the following meanings: reset See definition in Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary Line breaks: re¦set Pronunciation: /riːˈsɛt/ Definition of reset in English: ...
28
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6answers
3k views
0
votes
1answer
70 views

“One thing to note” or “One thing to be noted”? [closed]

Just stumbled which to use when I was writing something. "One thing to note" seems to be used much more often, but clarifications from experts would be helpful.
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Which is best, “to access” or “of access”?

When describing someone who is reclusive is it better to say: He was difficult to access. or He was difficult of access.
2
votes
3answers
80 views

“Commit” vs. “commitment” vs. “committing” in computer-related texts

Let’s suppose we have the following excerpt: how the target DB engine handles data commitment how the target DB engine handles data commit how the target DB engine handles data committing Which ...
0
votes
3answers
67 views

Word for person who shops for others as a profession

Someone who has a great taste in fashion could help others with their shopping, but as a profession not as a hobby. The inspiration for this question is from the movie "In Her Shoes".
0
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2answers
35 views

multiple number change, at a rate? with a ratio? fold?

A (a=1, b=2, c=3) then, B (a=1.5, b=3, c=4.5) C (a=3, b=6, c=9) D (a=0.5, b=1, c=1.5) As above, based on the amounts of the elements in group A, the elements of B, C, and D were changed ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

“Enquire from someone” vs “enquire with someone”

Which is the correct sentence from these two? Can you enquire from her? Can you enquire with her? I tried to search the internet but most results talk about the difference between ...
0
votes
3answers
90 views

An adjective to indicate that there is too much text on a slide

Your slide is too adj What's an adjective to indicate that there are too many words on a slide?
0
votes
2answers
87 views

“May” vs. “might” [duplicate]

What’s the difference between these sentences: I thought you might be interested in looking at this event. I thought you may be interested in looking at this event.
0
votes
0answers
39 views

On playing with words for naming and titling

I've watched a movie titled "Rain Fall" in which Rain was surname of the main character. The first thing that the title brings into mind is "rainfall". In fact, it's a common way of playing with words ...
0
votes
3answers
64 views

“Happy for you are improving”—grammatically correct?

Is it correct to say I am happy for you are improving! or does it necessarily have to be with that, as in here: I am happy that you are improving! ?
0
votes
3answers
51 views

Are “prototypical” and “prototypal” different?

I typed prototypal inheritance and got a wavy red underline conveying a alternative word for the same from Google. I am getting the same underline while typing this post. The suggestion is ...
-1
votes
1answer
37 views

“Rise in” vs. “rise of”

What’s the difference between "rise in" and "rise of"? Specifically, I am looking at the sentence: The rise __ juvenile crime is attributed to three factors. Which preposition should I choose?
0
votes
1answer
37 views

“Will I” vs. “I will”

As in the following sentence: When I have the time, I will watch a new episode of one of the aforementioned Netflix shows, though rarely I will watch one of the shows below: vs. When I have ...
0
votes
4answers
47 views

Integrally or Comprehensively

I am looking for an adverb that implies "all at the same time" or ""in an all-inclusive way". My sentence is like this: "The above algorithm comprehensively solves Sub-problems 1, 2, and 3 of the ...
0
votes
3answers
30 views

What is the exact word for a vehicle usage statistics?

I was wondering what is the exact word of a vehicle usage statistics? For example, what should I call my car's total traversed distance?
0
votes
0answers
38 views

Is there any difference between “crenellations” and “battlements”? [duplicate]

Both these terms seem to refer to the jagged parapets you see on classic medieval castle towers. Merriam-Webster defines "battlement" like this: a parapet with open spaces that surmounts a wall ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

amongst and amidst and other words ending in -st

Came across this article earlier today, and now I'm questioning everything- Are "amongst" and "amidst" synonymous as the article states? Also, rather than possessing the "excrescent -st suffix", ...
0
votes
3answers
83 views

What is the UK-English Equivalent for “band-aid?”

What is the UK-English equivalent for "band-aid?" That is, the bandage one puts over cuts and the like?
0
votes
1answer
26 views

populate vs. autopopulate

In technical writing, when describing how the software performs the action of completing a field on a screen, do you describe the field as being 'automatically populated' or just 'populated'? Does ...
0
votes
3answers
68 views

English word for “Zeitgeschehen” (present happenings)

The German word Zeitgeschehen is a noun that describes present happenings in general. Zeitgeschehen is most commonly used as the name of a section in media. Society, culture, news, … are put together ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

“metaphoric” versus “metaphorical”

Is there a difference between the words "metaphoric" and "metaphorical"? I'm reading an essay in which "metaphoric" is used. But that sounded a little odd to me. "Metaphorical" sounds better. ...
1
vote
1answer
79 views

Is there any difference between “it's dead to me” and “it's dead for me?”

I read iTunes Is Dead to Me and was curious if there is any difference between saying "iTunes is dead to me" and "iTunes is dead for me?"
1
vote
1answer
27 views

Do harbour cranes lay dormant?

I am trying to construct 'alternate text' for a photograph I am submitting for evaluation. The photo is in the 'cityscape' category and depicts the harbour at dawn with cranes that are normally busy - ...
1
vote
2answers
124 views

The difference between 'transfer' and 'transit' in the context of airports and train stations

There appears to be a fine shade of meaning between the words 'transfer' and 'transit' in the domain of airports and train stations, possibly sea ports as well. Consider this typical usage ...
-1
votes
1answer
42 views

The meaning of this sentence [closed]

"A love of the outdoors runs in the family." I don't know which meaning of "run " I should choose. Please help me explain the meaning of this sentence.
0
votes
6answers
129 views

Antonym for perfectionist.

A perfectionist is: a person who wants everything to be perfect and demands the highest standards possible. (Cambridge Dict.) What noun could be used to refer to the opposite of the ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Alternatives to “Or so I thought”?

That chair was very sturdy, or so I thought. "Or so I thought" means the previous phrase is wrong after a while of consideration. (or something similar) Is there any term/words that can replace ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Which determiner to use with degrees: “a” or “my/his/her/your”?

Examples: She has a PhD in biophysics. She has her PhD in biophysics. And: He has a black belt in judo. He has his black belt in judo.
0
votes
3answers
59 views

What's the difference between “increased” and “increasing”?

What's the difference between "at an increased rate" and "at an increasing rate". It seems to me both of these are correct and no difference. Am I right?
2
votes
0answers
345 views

would you ask someone to drive safe or to drive safely? [duplicate]

When someone is going to drive their car somewhere, I always used to say "drive safely" to them. Recently I was told I should say "drive safe." Which is correct? So it's about when to use the word ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

“Curious as to who” vs. “curious of who”

I'm curious as to who you are. I'm curious of who you are. The person is anonymous and I'm just wondering who it is.
1
vote
3answers
67 views

What would be an exact word to describe taking solace in other's misfortune, knowing one is not alone in facing it?

Schadenfreude implies deriving 'pleasure' in other's misfortune but what I am looking for is a word where one derives comfort that one's misfortune is faced by others as well. For instance, knowing at ...
-1
votes
2answers
30 views

“Table of Contents” vs. “Contents”

I'm a student and about to write my first scientific paper in English. I'm currently not sure how to name the "table of contents". The dictionary says that "Contents" is more popular, but I have seen ...
0
votes
3answers
59 views

“Sponsoring” without implying funding

I am trying to replace the term "sponsored" in the following context, with a better term that does not imply receiving funds or support of any kind. Project X was sponsored by Company Y. Any ...
1
vote
4answers
66 views

What is the antonym of “isolated” in the context of chemical substance?

I am looking for a word which would mean "not an isolated substance". I would use "blend" or "mixture", but these would imply that the components where isolated in the first place and then blended ...
2
votes
4answers
76 views

Which of “I’d rather it be/were you” is/are correct?

Which of these is correct and why? I’d rather it be you. I’d rather it were you.
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Is this the right way of framing the sentence

I am preparing my resume and I would like to have your opinion on the grammatical correctness of the following sentences. Taught Laboratory sessions, graded home works, exams for PH 101 (Course ...
3
votes
10answers
258 views

Word for a given situation

In the spirit of The Big Bang TV show titles I am looking for a word to use in a particular situation. First, there's a joke that sets up the scenario. 2 guys camping. They are barefoot by the fire. ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

aberration vs aberrance vs aberrancy

All three nouns are derived from aberrant, the latter two are not used often I suppose considering that spell check considered them misspelt. What are the difference between the three? Are they ...
8
votes
13answers
1k views

An adjective or noun for someone who “has a lot of gall”?

What would be a suitable term for someone who has a lot of gall or has the gall to? Specifically someone who has wronged you or yours, or taken something from you, and should be repentant (and ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

verb of 'remediation' (no such thing as 'remediated')

As in the sentence: The pill, in combination with a lot of water, remediated the [effects of the] alcohol. I know there's no such word, only remediation, but I wish it was a word, because it ...