This tag is for questions about choosing the best word for a particular context or meaning.

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0
votes
1answer
35 views

date has already passed OR date has already past? [closed]

Which is correct : date has already passed , or date has already past ? Thanks
-1
votes
0answers
30 views

Under what circumstances is the word “that” necessary, optional, or to be replaced with “which”? [duplicate]

When is it necessary to include "that" in a sentence? In what case should "which" be used, and is it ever optional? Some examples: I didn't know (that) you had to leave. My grandma said (that) her ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Emissary / Ambassador / Representative / Envoy / Delegate

These words are all more or less interchangeable, but I'm wondering which is most distinguished. If I have a group of representatives, but some are the leaders of their groups and others are just ...
3
votes
5answers
73 views

Antonym (or dual) for 'anachronism'

I'm looking for a word or a phrase (preferably a noun phrase) that describes something current, which should not be still present, because it is kind of outdated, but is still around us because of ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

Where to place “among other things”?

I'll be placing a short introduction on a web site and the introduction includes a sentence similar to this: I'm – among many other things – a hobbyist coder. I'm unsure about the ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

Word for when something turns out to be the opposite of what you believed? [duplicate]

I've been wondering for a while, if there is a word for when something turns out to be the complete opposite of what you believed. So, something that would fit in a sentence like below would be ...
5
votes
5answers
1k views

Word for someone who always corrects misspellings

Is there a specific word for the type of person who always corrects misspellings? Something exact, not something like perfectionist, grammar nazi or anal. Something that describes the person, like ...
-1
votes
1answer
32 views

word describing the demographic make up of those members attending the church worship majority of the time [closed]

What is the word describing a church congregation describing those in attendance such as those who have similar qualities as a people group like older, middle class all white?
31
votes
16answers
8k views

Is there a word which means whatever you want it to mean? Or has no meaning?

I'm looking for a word which can be used in any situation to describe something in whatever way you want, i.e it's not a word and just fits in to places..., but is there an actual word which does ...
0
votes
2answers
64 views

Vehicle vs car words usage [closed]

Consider that somebody should name field in some kind of questionnaire (e.g. for a bank), or name a class in programming language for purpose of describing person's private transport facility ...
4
votes
5answers
378 views

How to ask for the title on cheque?

If I need to know whose name should I put in title of a cheque, what would be the most precise and educated sentence? I have to pay someone some money via cheque but I want to ask them whose name ...
0
votes
2answers
47 views

Word for someone who is “pretentious”, but without negative connotation?

Pretentious is defined as "attempting to impress by affecting greater importance, talent, culture, etc., than is actually possessed." What if someone does impress others because they actually do have ...
1
vote
2answers
42 views

Systemically vs systematically [closed]

From a colleague's email, "Given that the expected business process is not working and has been causing a lot of issues across different systems, it is evident that we need to enforce the process ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

use of distainer office, distrainment proceedings, etc

Is "distainer office, distrainment proceedings, distrain order, ..." correct? Even this spell checker highlights these words as incorrect. Some translations use execution office, executor's office, ...
-1
votes
3answers
54 views

What is more natural: 'people like you' or 'person as you'?

It's nice to have people like you here. It's nice to have people as you here. It's nice to have persons like you here. It's nice to have persons as you here. I always say there is ...
0
votes
2answers
58 views

If walking across the street unlawfully is jaywalking, is it safe to say biking across the street is jaybiking?

Can the prefix "jay-" be used with any verb form so long as it represents crossing a street illegally? For example, I went to NYC the past week for vacation, and noticed so many people, and bikers, ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

What is the difference between “X is needed” and “X is necessary”?

Do the following two sentences mean the same? A: If you improve the quality of your data, less data is needed to achieve an error rate of 30%. B: If you improve the quality of your data, less ...
0
votes
2answers
35 views

What's a better word for “part” in this sentence?

The new technology divided the world - or at least the part that could pay - in two: those who [blah blah blah] and those who [blah blah blah]. I would use "or at least those who could pay" but I ...
2
votes
5answers
148 views

“Females under the age of…” instead of “Women under the age of…” Is that offensive?

Is it offensive to refer to women as "females", as I've seen posted at the entrance of a night club: "Females under the age of twenty-one will have to...."
2
votes
4answers
124 views

Using 'nascent' in a negative context

Is it an inappropriate choice of word to use 'nascent' in a negative context? For example, "Auditory hallucinations were one of the more notable symptoms of his nascent schizophrenia." Or should the ...
2
votes
5answers
202 views

How would you describe: Read a book, but not cover-to-cover?

As the title says. I'm looking for a good word or expression for saying something like "I have read only several chapters from random location of the book, but someday I want to read from cover to ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

What are the fourth and fifth levels in this context? [duplicate]

One can use the terms primary, secondary, and tertiary to describe the first, second, and third levels of something. What would the fourth level be called? Would it be something like "quartiary" or ...
-2
votes
1answer
77 views

Word for region between waist and hips [closed]

I'm searching for a word for the part of the body between the waist and hips, or encompassing both, particularly regarding human females. Any guesses? Inventions?
9
votes
10answers
419 views

“Psychically” vs. “psychologically” vs. “mentally”

This one has been giving me headaches for about a year now. Some time ago, I created an AskReddit thread with the following title: How do you psychically prepare for pain before a surgical ...
0
votes
2answers
60 views

Unforgettable or Memorable?

I was writing a thank you letter to someone I had good time with. I was fighting between two adjectives to describe the experience. These are: 1. unforgettable, 2. memorable. The questions that I was ...
2
votes
8answers
129 views

“Food for thought” in a word

How can I express "food for thought" in a word? Does such a word exist? Example usage: The world will only know peace when our love for power is exceeded by our power to love. That's __ ...
4
votes
2answers
130 views

Why does the word “tortilla” refer to three distinct types of edibles?

The crisps[BrEn]/chips[AmEn] that are made of corn (and probably not deep-fried) are called tortilla: The wraps with that special taste, are called tortila: And then, the omelet-like meal is ...
10
votes
4answers
2k views

What are “schlieren” in English?

The German word for these patterns is "Schliere, pl. Schlieren", and apparently this word has entered the English language as a loanword (cf. article Schlieren in Wikipedia or entry schliere in OED). ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Job Position term [closed]

Anyone from the corporate world, what do you call someone who talks to possible clients (or apply to jobs for a client?!), and seals the contract on the owner's behalf? Does this position exist? Lol.
1
vote
0answers
56 views

Inoffensive exclamatory word to express surprise [closed]

Is there an inoffensive (possibly slang) term that can be used to express surprise in the "WTF" sense? For example, this term would be appropriate upon seeing that the stock market has fallen several ...
-2
votes
2answers
50 views

Is there a word that describes this feeling? [closed]

The rising star shows no remorse for the figment of existence to which man shows no resolve. There is no depression, for there is no sadness. There is no boredom, for there is no annoyance. The world ...
1
vote
3answers
77 views

Best way to say something affects another but only moderately?

There is a saying that "Correlation does not imply causation." I am trying to find the best way, preferrably in a word or short phrase, to explain when one thing really does have a causal effect on ...
4
votes
4answers
560 views

What is it called when you say something but it does not imply for the other?

I'm really lost for words... For example, I like people with short hair. But then someone could say, so you hate people with long hair? But, of course, I did not give any information on people with ...
3
votes
9answers
605 views

A more suitable word for events which occur in a book/movie/etc

I'm looking for a more suitable word than event for something which occurs in (in my particular case) a book. If one was to summarise the events (ugh) of a book - just so there's no doubt about what ...
1
vote
4answers
76 views

Another word for “consume” that's clearly about incorporeal things?

I'm looking for a single verb with similar meaning to gaining, consuming or gathering, but only in a context of information, knowledge or ideas. So the word itself should make clear that I'm talking ...
1
vote
2answers
47 views

Can the adjective “squalid” be used to describe a person?

As the title states: Can squalid be used to describe a person that has really fallen on hard times (ragged clothing, worn-out, haggard etc.)? And if it can be used as such, how does it compare to ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

I don't know if this is an awkward usage of “for which” and an adjective

The figure of casualties is presumed to be significantly higher, but there are no specific data for which published. The latter part of the sentence sounds a little awkward to me. I just want to ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

What do you call a scale going down?

I asked a physics question about a scale tipping over and asked Which way does the scale tip? I was later corrected that I should have asked whether the scale would tip down or tip up. So it made me ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

to pickup or be picked up

Is it better to say: "something is available for pickup in my office" or "something is available to be picked up in my office"? Also is pickup one word or two in the above sentence?
1
vote
2answers
443 views

Why do they say “may not” for things which people shouldn't do

I have seen in so many place where they would have mentioned "You may not.." etc for the things people shouldn't do. For eg: in companies where USB is not allowed, they will mention like this "You may ...
7
votes
10answers
3k views

Is there a word for fake kindness or hospitality?

Is there a word for faking kindness/hospitality to sound more tactful and decent than you really are (which could be categorized as some sort of hypocrisy)? For example, saying: Pay us a visit ...
1
vote
2answers
58 views

Any better word for “upsell”

My company provides more value to my clients by offering them services that could enhance their business/process. The process involves: I point a void (improvement scope) to the client. I look out ...
0
votes
2answers
54 views

Which is correct, “ready to give” or “ready to take”?

A company which develops a particular application for business persons has on their website the following: Ready to give a test drive? Request a Demo Now. In my opinion, the correct sentence ...
0
votes
0answers
69 views

Proper greetings on the phone [migrated]

English is my 2nd language and I need your advice on this little awkward moment I had with a lady on the phone today. She left a voice message so I was returning her call. Me: Hi. I'm ** returning ...
22
votes
3answers
5k views

What is the “‑cide” word for killing one’s husband?

We have uxoricide for killing one’s wife, but what is the equivalent term for killing one’s husband? Similarly, what is the husband-specific equivalent for the adjective uxorial?
0
votes
1answer
124 views

How to reply to someone's welcome [closed]

What should we say in reply to a person who welcomes us to a particular place, for example one says: You are welcome to ABC company. or I welcome you to our home. or Welcome Mr. Abc ...
0
votes
1answer
78 views

Is the word “Shinobi” an accepted English word?

I've been wondering if the word "Shinobi" is an accepted English word. As far as I know, its synonym "Ninja" is an accepted English word where "Spy" is the nearest common English.
1
vote
1answer
48 views

“At the service of” versus “in the service of”

In doing a translation on duolingo, another translator had translated a phrase to say "at the service of X". I edited this to "in the service of X" and left a comment that as a native speaker, hearing ...
2
votes
1answer
111 views

What is the difference between “super” and “superb”?

I have seen usage of both super and superb. I also searched for meaning of these two words and found they are almost identical. Example sentences - She is a super girl. His performance in the last ...
3
votes
6answers
209 views

What are entries of the same year called

I want to know a word for a group of students who enroll in a university at the same department at the same time. I tried looking it up in google but didn't get any real results.