This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning.

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-2
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1answer
42 views

What does “illuminate” mean?

What is the meaning of illuminate regarding skin appearance? What is the difference between shiny or glowing in this context?
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Long-term v lifelong [closed]

Should I say "It's been a long-term dream of mine to do sth" or "It's been a lifelong dream of mine to do sth"
1
vote
5answers
100 views

how to say “friends who love to quarrel”

I am translating a story with a word (kenka-tomodachi) meaning "quarrel-friends" or old friends who love to fight constantly about things as their basic way of interacting. Can anyone think of an ...
13
votes
9answers
2k views

Antonym of Overlap?

I'm looking for a word which means "leaving space around", as an antonym of overlap. Specific example case: The server's service stops between 23:00 and 00:00 UTC, therefore to avoid generating ...
3
votes
2answers
66 views

What is a word that means related to moons?

I'm looking for a word that means "relating to moons" or "pertaining to moons". The context of the sentence is "I need to make a intermoonary injection burn in 10 seconds". I'm looking for a word ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Which is best: draw a diagram or plot a diagram (an engineering type of diagram)?

I am to prepare an essay that explains (attempts to at least) how to generate a time-temperature-transformation diagrams, also known as TTT diagrams. They look like this: Wikipedia ...
3
votes
4answers
104 views

How to add emphasis without using profanity [closed]

My son uses fuck or fucking to emphasize his statements. I told him there are words that you can use that aren't so offensive for my 3 year old grandchild to parrot! He asked what word is so globally ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

About Verbs that can be followed by object + infinitive

For instance, "The concepts in the next chapter should help persuade them." And then, englishgrammer.org explain this, "Some verbs are followed by object + infinitive without to. Examples are: let, ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

What's the difference between “to validate” and “to confirm”? [closed]

What's the difference between “to validate” and “to confirm”? What is more natural to use in day to day situations. Can you confirm this for me? Can you validate this for me? For example, if there is ...
2
votes
2answers
32 views

Pictographs and other types of writing

If someone is writing in pictographs, would the correct verb to describe the action be, "to write"? Or would it be to depict or something along those lines?
3
votes
3answers
52 views

Modern words for “contrariwise”

Does contrariwise sound old-fashioned? As in Alice in Wonderland: ‘Contrariwise,’ continued Tweedledee, ‘if it was so, it might be.’ What are the modern words for contrariwise?
0
votes
0answers
43 views

Preposition: Within vs In

Is there a distinction between "within" and "in" as in, "upon finding a violation within the preceding four years" versus "upon finding a violation in the preceding four years"?
0
votes
1answer
39 views

how to use the word imperative?

how to use the word imperative when referring to plural and not singular? the above mentioned issues are imperative to the growth of the economy or the above mentioned issues are imperatives to the ...
1
vote
3answers
136 views

How to express the idea that you are so scared that you almost pee in your pants? “be scared to pee” maybe?

Ok, we got the idiom "be scared to death" = "feel extremely frightened" (see http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/scare+to+death) "be scared to death" does not mean "you are scared that you will be ...
3
votes
3answers
61 views

Is it common to use the word “throbbings” (plural of throbbing) as a noun?

I ask because my word processor highlighted it as a wrong word. And I couldn't find any instances of my desired usage on Google. Here's an example sentence: I have migraines. I'm not talking ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

How can we describe a broad sense of taste?

How can we describe a broad sense of taste? Can we say that we have a versatile taste? Or is it more correct to say that we have a diverse taste? Taste here is with reference to food.
3
votes
3answers
88 views

What is the difference between candidly and honestly?

In almost every dictionary, candidly and honestly are explained as having the same meaning. Still, I'm pretty sure there must be some difference, whether big or tiny. Any reasonable tip would be much ...
1
vote
6answers
158 views

what is the opposite way of an expression of “win-win situation”?

I am just trying to find out an expression that is an opposite of "win-win situation? when you are having problems or in troubles and trying to get out or to solve those problems in multiple way but ...
0
votes
1answer
76 views

To prove some property “to stretch to some class of objects”

While collaborating in the writing of a scientific paper, one of the co-authors wrote ".../... and we will prove it to stretch to some class", is it usual ? The context is the following. "Then, ...
2
votes
5answers
412 views

Made me abreast?

Background: I had spoken to Person A on the phone, and he caught me up with the happenings of Person B. Is it correct to tell Person B that "he [Person A] made me abreast of what was going on with ...
0
votes
3answers
74 views

One word for something that works well? [closed]

I am looking for a single word for something that works well or something that doesn’t work well as interventions. I don’t not want to use efficient or proper because these describe the person or ...
0
votes
3answers
95 views

is “I am scary” sentence right or wrong?

Ok, scary = frightening (source: https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=define%3Ascary) And we often hear "it is frightening" and "I am frightened ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

What is the difference between “acquisitional”, “acquisitive”, and “acquisitory”?

I am actually a native speaker, but this one threw me. "Acquisitory" seems to be associated with avarice/greed, possibly specifically for material goods. "Acquisitive" also seems to be related to ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

What is the meaning of “reset” in this sentence?

What was the meaning of "reset" in this letter? "change"?, "setting again?" , “setting back to the original state" We did not "reset the time" in these animals. We put them into an environment ...
6
votes
4answers
185 views

What’s a person who borrows something but won’t return it?

I cannot find the right words or expression or idiom to describe a person who borrows something from someone but will not return it to its owner. Also, I would like to know the word that describes a ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

When to use “gather” versus “hunt”?

Is there a good and fast rule for when to the verb ‘gather’ versus ‘hunt’ for venturing out for food? I always thought that plants were gathered and animals were hunted. However ‘mushroom hunting’ is ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

What is the difference between apologize and apologise and how could use it in suitable place? [duplicate]

I am confused every time when I am using these words, then using any one of them without knowing its difference. Can anyone help me how could I use these words in appropriate situation?
0
votes
1answer
58 views

What's a more appropriate word than verbatim or literal in this context?

The XML file is being transcribed verbatim to generate the form on the web page. Perhaps literal fits better than verbatim, as the former denotes a looser correlation (in my opinion) than the ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Lexical collocation of “former”

Imagine that you are the president of a company, and there was another person playing the same role before you. How should I describe the former president using the expression like "He was the ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

Reset = “setting again” or to “setting back to the original state”?

In the OED dictionary, "Reset" has the following meanings: reset See definition in Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary Line breaks: re¦set Pronunciation: /riːˈsɛt/ Definition of reset in English: ...
29
votes
6answers
3k views
0
votes
1answer
77 views

“One thing to note” or “One thing to be noted”? [closed]

Just stumbled which to use when I was writing something. "One thing to note" seems to be used much more often, but clarifications from experts would be helpful.
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Which is best, “to access” or “of access”?

When describing someone who is reclusive is it better to say: He was difficult to access. or He was difficult of access.
2
votes
3answers
80 views

“Commit” vs. “commitment” vs. “committing” in computer-related texts

Let’s suppose we have the following excerpt: how the target DB engine handles data commitment how the target DB engine handles data commit how the target DB engine handles data committing Which ...
0
votes
3answers
67 views

Word for person who shops for others as a profession

Someone who has a great taste in fashion could help others with their shopping, but as a profession not as a hobby. The inspiration for this question is from the movie "In Her Shoes".
0
votes
2answers
35 views

multiple number change, at a rate? with a ratio? fold?

A (a=1, b=2, c=3) then, B (a=1.5, b=3, c=4.5) C (a=3, b=6, c=9) D (a=0.5, b=1, c=1.5) As above, based on the amounts of the elements in group A, the elements of B, C, and D were changed ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

“Enquire from someone” vs “enquire with someone”

Which is the correct sentence from these two? Can you enquire from her? Can you enquire with her? I tried to search the internet but most results talk about the difference between ...
0
votes
3answers
90 views

An adjective to indicate that there is too much text on a slide

Your slide is too adj What's an adjective to indicate that there are too many words on a slide?
0
votes
2answers
89 views

“May” vs. “might” [duplicate]

What’s the difference between these sentences: I thought you might be interested in looking at this event. I thought you may be interested in looking at this event.
0
votes
0answers
40 views

On playing with words for naming and titling

I've watched a movie titled "Rain Fall" in which Rain was surname of the main character. The first thing that the title brings into mind is "rainfall". In fact, it's a common way of playing with words ...
0
votes
3answers
67 views

“Happy for you are improving”—grammatically correct?

Is it correct to say I am happy for you are improving! or does it necessarily have to be with that, as in here: I am happy that you are improving! ?
0
votes
3answers
52 views

Are “prototypical” and “prototypal” different?

I typed prototypal inheritance and got a wavy red underline conveying a alternative word for the same from Google. I am getting the same underline while typing this post. The suggestion is ...
-1
votes
1answer
38 views

“Rise in” vs. “rise of”

What’s the difference between "rise in" and "rise of"? Specifically, I am looking at the sentence: The rise __ juvenile crime is attributed to three factors. Which preposition should I choose?
0
votes
1answer
38 views

“Will I” vs. “I will”

As in the following sentence: When I have the time, I will watch a new episode of one of the aforementioned Netflix shows, though rarely I will watch one of the shows below: vs. When I have ...
0
votes
4answers
47 views

Integrally or Comprehensively

I am looking for an adverb that implies "all at the same time" or ""in an all-inclusive way". My sentence is like this: "The above algorithm comprehensively solves Sub-problems 1, 2, and 3 of the ...
0
votes
3answers
30 views

What is the exact word for a vehicle usage statistics?

I was wondering what is the exact word of a vehicle usage statistics? For example, what should I call my car's total traversed distance?
0
votes
0answers
38 views

Is there any difference between “crenellations” and “battlements”? [duplicate]

Both these terms seem to refer to the jagged parapets you see on classic medieval castle towers. Merriam-Webster defines "battlement" like this: a parapet with open spaces that surmounts a wall ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

amongst and amidst and other words ending in -st

Came across this article earlier today, and now I'm questioning everything- Are "amongst" and "amidst" synonymous as the article states? Also, rather than possessing the "excrescent -st suffix", ...
0
votes
3answers
84 views

What is the UK-English Equivalent for “band-aid?”

What is the UK-English equivalent for "band-aid?" That is, the bandage one puts over cuts and the like?
0
votes
1answer
28 views

populate vs. autopopulate

In technical writing, when describing how the software performs the action of completing a field on a screen, do you describe the field as being 'automatically populated' or just 'populated'? Does ...