This tag is for questions about choosing the best word for a particular context or meaning.

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2
votes
2answers
41 views

How to understand “so much signs” in this sentence?

Here is a sentence from Literature, Technology and Modernity, 1860-2000: Just as Vickery has been turned into a three-dimensional negative by an electrical storm, the war dead survived, by the ...
0
votes
3answers
55 views

You really want to help someone, but that individual becomes suspicious of the nature of your help and questions it

I don’t know what to call the behavior of those who don’t believe that anybody acts with good intentions, so I'm looking for a suitable word, idiom or expression.
2
votes
4answers
121 views

Fear of asking girl out - is called …?

Fear or phobia of asking girl out, fear of rejection(that she would say no or even worse). Here, Soceraphobia (fear of her father/brother) is not involved. Mostly guys are feared by most compelling ...
1
vote
3answers
69 views

Why do cricket and baseball each use the term 'pitch' but in different senses?

I should say from the outset that I do know the answer to this question, because I have just researched it. But it is so interesting that I felt it was worth an airing. I am not clear if it is ...
-2
votes
1answer
71 views

What is an alternative word for “eaten” [closed]

I am describing the context here: Person A: Hey, how was your birthday party on Sunday? Person B: Party was pretty good, but of all the food we ordered only 40% was eaten/consumed by the ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

What do we now call a 'Principal Boy'?

In the British pantomime 'Principal Boy' has always referred to the main male role e.g. Jack in Jack and the Beanstalk, Aladdin, Peter Pan etc. It has traditionally been played by a female, especially ...
9
votes
6answers
1k views

Similar term to “visual” for audio?

I'm looking for a term for audio in form of the word visual. Visual is defined as of or relating to the sense of sight What could you call the sense of hearing? Also, what do you call this ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

Does the verb “to onset” exist? [closed]

I just heard (for the first time) onset being used as a verb in a scientific talk. According to ODE and Webster, there is no verb "onset". However, wikipedia does mention it. Could the native ...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

“a while” vs “awhile”

Is there a difference between "awhile" and "a while"? If there is, what is it? I've been wondering this for awhile, but now I actually need the answer.
1
vote
3answers
75 views

I am an intern of/in/at [company name]?

I want to say that I am doing my internship in/at [company name]. Please give me some more examples using the word "intern" or "internship". There seem to be differences between e.g. hospital and ...
1
vote
3answers
62 views

a word or a phrase for “something that entails spending money” [closed]

I need to know a word or a phrase for the following: "Something that entails spending money"
13
votes
6answers
2k views

How does one describe people who do not pick up irony, or vibes?

I realise that at a severe level this can present as a symptom of Asperger's Syndrome, or High Functioning Autism. But I am not talking about that. I am referring to people who just don't seem to ...
-1
votes
0answers
43 views

why do we say “deaf ears”- Is it not pleonasm [closed]

If one is deaf, he/she can't hear or have extremely limited hearing abilities. And since hearing is about ears or vice-versa... Can we say "deaf ears" when we refer to people?
2
votes
1answer
35 views

“In case” vs “if”?

I was taught that "in case" does not mean "if". As in: I will give you my card in case you need it. (Take it and use in case of need in the future) I will give you my card if you need it. ...
32
votes
9answers
4k views

Word for metallic “dust”?

What’s the English word for the metallic “dust”, or more precisely the tiny remains (waste) of drilling, welding, cutting through metal, and similar metal processing?
2
votes
2answers
40 views

Another way to express “ignore the pain” [closed]

Jim had ignored the pain thinking it was nothing. What are some word choices for ignore?
0
votes
0answers
24 views

What is better word to 'defaulter' describing a person who did not follow a process? [closed]

In office everyone needs to fill their time logs, failing to person receives the email. The manager refers to person(s) as defaulter. Is there any other word which can be used here ? (I believe its a ...
20
votes
9answers
3k views

What is it called when something you previously took to be a mistake turned out to be the correct decision?

Sometimes your “mistake” results in a big success, or you find out that it actually was the correct way of doing it. I sarcastically call this a “correct mistake”. What do you call it? I don’t know if ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

Can “my pleasure” carry negative connotations

Is it appropriate to say 'my Pleasure'- In a job interview and e-mails closings. "I really enjoyed talking with you - my pleasure" Or would a simple 'thank you' be more appropriate. Can "my ...
4
votes
2answers
75 views

One (or few) word expression for products you don't know you need

I'd like to find a very simple, preferably one word (or few words) expression for products that you don't know you need until you see them. Examples are: electronic face cleanser sleep enhancing app ...
-4
votes
2answers
43 views

Can this sentence be shortened without additional jargon? [closed]

From Wikipedia:"Homology modelling": Homology modeling, also known as comparative modeling of protein, refers to constructing an atomic-resolution model of the "target" protein from its amino ...
33
votes
18answers
5k views

Completing something just to finish it despite lack of interest - is called …?

Recently I started reading a novel that I was excited to read. After getting approximately 45% into it, I lost the pace. It started becoming slow and lousy. I thought to leave it unfinished but it ...
0
votes
0answers
66 views

why using the word “graphic” rather than the word “gore”? [closed]

When should the word "graphic," rather than the word "gore", be used? Actual Meanings of Gore & Graphic: Graphic: An image that is generated by a computer Gore: Coagulated blood from ...
4
votes
4answers
204 views

Using “largely” to mean “significantly”. Which is correct?

I have a question concerning usage of the word "largely". While proof-reading a text written by a colleague* I saw a phrase similar to the following: "Because of these advantages, technique X largely ...
1
vote
2answers
80 views

When a school is registering kids for college, what is that called?

During last years registration enrollment, we had 1,457 children register. Is "registration enrollment" the best choice here? The reason I don't just use the word "registration" is that a ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

better way to write “in Apple's iMac's common MacOS”

I was looking at a better way to write the following while emphasizing Apple in the beginning. But it seems like too many possessive s usages. What could be a substitute? "The software that runs ...
2
votes
3answers
109 views

Is there a synonym for “day” that can go with “at night”, “at dusk”, “at dawn”? [closed]

I need a word (ideally) or phrase that means "daytime" that can be used in a sentence "the event happened at dawn/dusk/night/day" "The event happened at day", and "The event happened at daytime" ...
2
votes
4answers
88 views

A good substitute for “developed a disease”?

The words contracting or catching a disease mainly refers to the communicable ones. If the disease/condition is a slowly developing one, then what would be a good substitute for "developed?" ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

“We make an identity for ourselves” or “We make identities for ourselves?”

The question is in the title. Which one is better? Why?
7
votes
2answers
277 views

Does one “take” a photocopy or “make” a photocopy? [closed]

If the verb for "photograph" is take, I presume that the verb for a "photographic copy" should also be take. The word photocopy is often abbreviated to copy. I have noticed the verb make is used for ...
4
votes
2answers
91 views

Formal way to say “I believe”

I am writing a chapter in a book and I want to say that "I believe that this researcher is right ....", in a more formal way. Can I say "The present author believes ....."
2
votes
6answers
151 views

Word for someone who blindly follows a religion or government

What word describes a person who blindly (unquestioningly) follows a government or religion? I am looking for a specific word that I came across recently but have since forgotten what is was and where ...
6
votes
13answers
1k views

How do you describe someone who can hear you or see you but pretends or ignores your presence while you are trying to get his or her attention ?

you are trying to get somebody's attention by waving your hand or saying hello! but he or she ignores you; I am looking for an Idiom or word to describe the situation or attitude of that person.
0
votes
2answers
47 views

Associates vs employees

I've noted that some US companies (I've seen that in less-than-stellar retail and fast-food chains) call people working for them "associates", rather than "employees". What would be the difference ...
2
votes
2answers
92 views

Thanks. You got it

Can "You got it, dude " be used as a reply to "thank you" in informal English?
4
votes
1answer
43 views

Etymology of legend (as used in a chart/map)?

Related question: “Legend” or “key”? Legend, also known as a Chart's Key, often located on the right hand side of the chart or graph. It took me some time to understand what the legend was when ...
1
vote
2answers
79 views

Another word for “kisses” or “slightly touches” or “barely makes contact”

I'm specifically trying to find the perfect word for this phrase I'm adding to Wikipedia: Oman's Musandam peninsula kisses the gulf at the Strait of Hormuz. But kisses really isn't the right ...
6
votes
3answers
248 views

What word describes languages that are written left-to-right, top-to-bottom?

I am trying to describe the set of languages that, like English, are written left to right, and was trying "romanized", but "romanized" describes transliteration to a different set of characters, such ...
3
votes
2answers
40 views

What is the right term for “I have some issues new users usually have when doing something new”

When trying a new product / service, and having some "initial road bumps" when getting started, is there a term that describes this situation? E.g. if I write to a support person - "Hi, I'm having ...
2
votes
2answers
82 views

Is “knob” associated with penis? [closed]

I'm working on something where I used the word knob for a button to drag. I thought this is the right word. Then today an english friend of mine told me that knob means penis in english. This would ...
2
votes
3answers
427 views

What is the adjective form of efficacy? [closed]

The word efficacy is often used in the medical field. For example, a paper might be on the efficacy of a treatment or a particular drug. The word, of course, implies how effectual that treatment or ...
2
votes
4answers
70 views

How to describe a person with the qualities give in the body of this question?

Which term can be used to describe a person who usually does his works by his own, for example, repairs his car himself, learns through self-studying, etc. (I look for something more specific or ...
3
votes
2answers
88 views

Contradictory rules about “who” and “whom” in relation to this sentence

I have a grammar which says that "whom" is used when it follow a preposition. i.g.: to whom am I speaking. to whom it may concern. The grammar also says that "whom" is the object form of "who". ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

“relaxed flying fingers” associated with ergonomic keyboard computer interface?

I want to start an open source software project and call it "relaxed flying fingers". The project is about a better keyboard interface, especially for touch typers (people typing with ten fingers). ...
0
votes
4answers
64 views

“Easy to adhere to” alternatives?

Apparently "adherable" should not be used in formal language (if the opposite is true, please correct me). Are there any more concise ways of saying "easy to adhere to", such as in this phrase: For ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Removing offensiveness from swear word [closed]

Is there a consensus in terms of the ranking of offensiveness given by the word "damn" and its derivatives? Damn Darn Dang Ding (as in ding-busted) I assume that the less a word sounds like the ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Proceed vs. Proceed further/ahead- Redundancy

In a training session on Business English, the instructor often said, proceed and proceed further, usually, after a pause by the speakers or whenever he interrupted. Examples: I ...
3
votes
3answers
108 views

Is there a concise word or phrase for the feeling of being unsure if someone is kidding?

I'm searching for a word for the feeling of uncertainty as to the sincerity of another person's statements or behavior. Or, the state of being that is to think someone is possibly putting on an act ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

“Head to” vs “head toward”

What should I use the former and when should I use the latter? For example: Sylvia and I grabbed our luggage and headed to the entrance. As we headed toward the center, I spotted a L-shaped ...
2
votes
1answer
45 views

What word or term describes a wire which is rigid, like a very thin rod?

The word wire usually describes a flexible strand of metal used to conduct electricity. However, there is a kind of non-flexible wire which can be used to transfer mechanical motion. I guess "rod" ...