This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning.

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3
votes
1answer
46 views

What would you call a laugh that sounded like a mix between wheezing and a hiccup

A friend of mine suggested that one of her co-workers laughed in such a fashion, and I was curious if there was a single word or phrase that might closely resemble that. I asked her if it sounded ...
0
votes
4answers
87 views

Is there any polite equivalent to “genitals”?

Albeit slightly conflicting, I was wondering if there's any more "polite", or better flowing word other than "genitals" in the context of: His genitals were cut off. It would be prefered if the ...
1
vote
2answers
86 views

Buying in increments

I am looking for the best word for when you have to buy something in increments or in certain quantity sizes. Minimum billing, minimum charge, minimum buy is typically used when you have to spend a ...
-1
votes
2answers
63 views

Is there a word or phrase that expresses the action of “a person thinking about what another person is doing when the other person is not around”

Is there a word or phrase that expresses the action of "a person thinking about what another person is doing when the other person is not around". for example, John is sitting in his room in Kentucky, ...
-1
votes
0answers
68 views

Confusion between:“{is/has} no chance” and “{is/has} no match” [closed]

Which form is correct in the sentences below? A snake has no chance/match to an angry rabbit. OR A snake is no chance/match to an angry rabbit. Please explain when I should use has ...
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

“It” vs. “this” [closed]

If I am sharing a (specific, identified) status update, which would be the most appropriate way of informing people that I will be sharing it: I am sharing it. or I am sharing this. In ...
1
vote
4answers
3k views

“make it to there” [on hold]

Consider the following two phrases which are both about going to some place: If I can't make it there If I can't make it to there Isn't the second phrase grammatically correct, whereas the ...
1
vote
5answers
82 views

Single word for scientific studies that change two factors at once

I am reviewing a number of studies for my thesis that all manipulate the same factors A (with levels A1 and A2) and B (with levels B1 and B2). Now some of them only manipulate A while keeping the ...
0
votes
3answers
84 views

Does this word exist? [on hold]

If you want to summarize "I am good in engaging (with) others", meaning "getting them interested and involved", can you say then "I'm an engager"? Or how would you call it, "I am an...". Does the word ...
1
vote
0answers
64 views

Can you “do” an action? [on hold]

I recall having read an article that states that you cannot "do" an action; thus "do it" is not acceptable. And the most prominent example of this is the slogan of Nike: Just "do it." The author ...
-1
votes
1answer
179 views

What do you call call a female philosopher? [closed]

If we want to select a word that specifically refers to a female philosopher rather than a male philosopher, what would that word be? There are many female counterparts for many masculine words, which ...
9
votes
5answers
2k views

Is it absolutely necessary to use “than” over “then” in a comparison? [closed]

Do you think you are smarter then me? While this question should be using than...I have to wonder if this is a debatable topic within English or is this cut and dry? If this specific instance is ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

'Lodge a complaint' vs 'file a complaint'

Is there any difference between lodge a complaint and file a complaint? I found two relevant senses for these words in the Oxford Advanced Learner Dictionary: lodge: to make formal statement ...
0
votes
1answer
573 views

“Much as” vs “Much like”

"Much as they had done with her..." "Much like they had done with her..." I was told that the use of "much like" in the second sentence is grammatically wrong. Any explanation is greatly ...
-1
votes
1answer
41 views

Would have find or found [closed]

A friend is looking for an apartment in a certain time in the future and she doubt if the owner would agree to renew her contract. So what do I say? Do I say "by the end of the contract you would have ...
-1
votes
0answers
20 views

the 'Wall', 'Doctor', etc., POINTS towards that vs. the 'Wall', 'Doctor', etc., POINT towards that [closed]

Which of the twain is a more appropriate, grammatically correct expression? "the 'Wall', 'Doctor', etc., POINTS towards that" or "the 'Wall', 'Doctor', etc., POINT towards that"
15
votes
4answers
964 views

Does one “shave” or “shear” a dog?

I was editing a question about the alleged dangers of shaving a dog. The associated pictures were like this: To me, this dog hasn't been shaved, i.e. removing all of the hair down to the skin, ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

What's the difference between “case by case” and “case to case”?

What's the difference between "case by case" and "case to case"? I often hear the former from my Japanese students. When I asked them where they got the phrase, they always say they learned it from ...
6
votes
9answers
7k views

Difference between “buy” and “purchase”

Referencing this answer. Are buy and purchase synonyms in every aspect/context of paying money? What I thought that these terms were unit-based: if you pay for a single unit (1 cigarette or 1 ...
-1
votes
6answers
110 views

Word for using software without knowing how it works

I am looking for single word or set of few words for the following meaning: Using software (for example calculating mean of 10 given numbers) without knowing the details how the software internally ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Difference between 'to seem' and 'to appear'

Is there a difference between the sentences "The general case seems to be open." and "The general case appears to be open." ? Or are they interchangeable?
8
votes
4answers
1k views

Is there a word for a person who believes all events - past, present and future - have all been predetermined?

Such person believes that whatever you did or do has been predetermined by a god or another omnipotent force. It's as if free will didn't exist. e.g. "It's no use trying to discuss it with you. You ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

“Cook at 200 degrees” or “cook in 200 degrees” or something else? [closed]

When talking about cooking in an oven, should I say "Cook at 200 degrees" or "cook in 200 degrees" or "cook on 200 degrees" or something else?
1
vote
1answer
34 views

class or classes?

I am reading spring docs and find this sentence: In several places an Inventor and Inventor’s Society class are used as the target objects for expression evaluation. Should the word class be ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Is there a word that defines describing something in the past with modern language? [duplicate]

For example, Jane Austen's carriage went up and down the hills like a roller coaster.
0
votes
2answers
81 views

Non-gendered collective title for a group of people in a business context

In a work context, what is a good word for addressing a mixed-gender group of people? Currently, "guys" seems to be fairly popular, but does have male overtones." Is there a really nothing better? A ...
0
votes
2answers
37 views

“Feed on” or “feed with”?

Is it correct to say, for example: "She fed him on lamb" as well as "She fed him with lamb"? Omitting the preposition and simply leaving the sentence as "She fed him lamb" sounds more acceptable to ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Is “in assistance with” correct?

I have drafted a letter containing the statement: In assistance with the team, the company registered sales amounting to $x in 2014-15 Is "In assistance with the team" a correct use of ...
13
votes
12answers
2k views

Alternative for “manning” a station

Is there a non-gendered term for manning a station, as in manning the desk? The only ideas I can come up with are "stationed at" the desk or other clunky things. Finding the right gerund would make my ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

melancholically or melancholic

In the example below, should I use melancholically or melancholic? Are either fine to use? "the music begins playing melancholically/melancholic over the dancefloor." Thanks for any input, much ...
10
votes
4answers
17k views

“Nowadays” vs “today”

I'm taking an English academic writing course. My teacher recommended using today as it is more accepted compared to nowadays. I asked her if this is accepted in American English (she's from US) or in ...
0
votes
2answers
63 views

Looking for the word which covers the eye lid of the horses and led the horse to run straight

I am looking for the word which covers the eye lid of the horses and led the horse to run straight without track distractions .. Some thing similar to funambulist.
1
vote
1answer
19 views

“given to” vs “marked by” vs “characterized by”

Based the definition I inferred from often seeing dictionary definitions of different words written using one or more of these three phrases, the three feel more or less the same. While a quick ...
0
votes
2answers
107 views

“Deliver using/with/by the certificate”

In the fragment "to complete and deliver construction works to the customer using the Certificate of Work Completion", how can I change the word using (in the sense of "by what means")? Should I ...
-1
votes
4answers
53 views

How are the words 'Suburb' and 'Superb' related to 'Superbas'?

All are Latin, or I guess come from Latin, but is it a direct shot to say that whenever Suburbs first became recognized and named, that they were given the status of being Superb? At one point was ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

What does “quotable” mean in this sentence? [closed]

Afters years of being one of the most quotable political operatives around, I developed a case of political laryngitis. All quotable's meanings have to do with putting something in between ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

Is it right to say “hastening the time of my own doom”?

Since hasten means accelerate, I feel the person is saying that he or she is saying shortening the time of his doom of making it pass away more quickly. The correct way or what I think he is trying ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

“Due to” or “because of”

I've already read a lot about the usage of "due to" and "because of" and it's clear to me when to use "due to" and when to use "because of". So "due to" is usually linked to the noun, right? The ...
1
vote
4answers
220 views

Why does my sentence seem to require an adjective?

In the midst of a paragraph, one of my students write, 'They taught us a way of cleaning.' I felt it sounded exponentially better to say, 'They taught us a new method of cleaning,' or 'new way'. Why ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

The past tense of 'input' [duplicate]

What is the past tense of the word 'input'? It doesn't sound right to me in this sentence but I am not really sure what should be used. They inputted the password in the database yesterday. What ...
-1
votes
0answers
38 views

Incomprehensible vs Unintelligble

I'm having hard times fathoming the difference between 'Incomprehensible' and 'Unintelligble' After some research, I assume that Incomprehensible would be used to express the inability to understand ...
1
vote
2answers
36 views

What does “post” mean in this context?

when your butler warns you to be wary of the grave risks you would be taking, you force your wary butler to resign from his post. Two possible meaning: point of view and occupation as a butler. ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Humans or people?

This is the sentence I've read: Freedom is something humans in all times have fought for. I am under the impression that the use of humans is not adequate here. Thus, my question is: when to ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views
2
votes
2answers
70 views

What is the word that describes the middle part of a presentation?

My presentation has three parts. I want to use "prologue" and "epilogue" to say part 1 is the introduction and part 3 is the conclusion of a presentation. I am wondering if there is a specialist ...
0
votes
4answers
70 views

Is “beguile” supposed to always be used in a bad way?

The definitions of it, pretty much all, involve words like "trickery" and "deception". But one legitimate definition can also be: to captivate with irresistible charm. Nothing too bad sounding.
0
votes
4answers
69 views

smug vs. full of oneself [closed]

Consider these two examples relating to a person who looks at the mirror more than one hundred time a day: She is very smug. She is full of herself. Are these two expressions both correct? ...
9
votes
2answers
6k views

“Sign in”, “signin” or “sign-in”

Which is correct: sign in, signin or sign-in when used as a noun and also as a verb?
0
votes
2answers
64 views

Cancer be beaten

Is there a name for this construction or wordplay? It can be both: Cancer be beaten Cancer can be beaten ("Can" in "Cancer" is emphasized for the purpose) It can be called a wordplay or a pun ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Use of “just” in technical writing as an adverb for location

I am editing a friend's scientific manuscript, which will ultimately be submitted to a biological journal. He uses "just" as an adverb to describe a location (emphasis added by me), e.g., The ...