0
votes
2answers
44 views

“What about” vs. ”what of”

Example from page 75 of Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer: But what of mandatory authorities? Are they as “binding” as the traditional terminology suggests? The answer depends on what ...
0
votes
3answers
62 views

Difference between “novice” and “newbie” [closed]

I can say "I am a novice in English" or "I am a newbie in English". Is there any difference between these?
1
vote
1answer
42 views

When to use the abverbial form of maximal: maximally?

Could the following sentence considered to be a correct use case of the adverbial form of the word maximal in English? Use underflow to set the maximally possible value of used datatype. When ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

Corresponding vs. appropriate

Let me give you some context first: Germans. We may have similar words with different meanings and use words just because they have a similar spelling. software company, writing software for ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

could and might to talk about future possibility

I have problem with using could in the future possibilities for example: They have the technology, but unless the government makes stricter laws, car companies ____ do it. With which one should I ...
-2
votes
0answers
53 views

Difference between “lady” and “woman”? [migrated]

Are there differences between "lady" and "woman" ? Google say lady is a polite social woman. But we don't use them just as this. Do we? English isn't my native language so I am better clarifying ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

“supervisor” vs. “mentor”

In master's theses it is common to state two people who oversaw or should have overseen the project. It is common that only one of these engaged himself with the student's work. At my university ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

What is the difference between “here goes” and “here it goes”?

I’m wondering what the difference between here goes and here it goes is. When something is going down and I want to express my feeling of “I’ll make it!”, which expression is correct? For example, ...
3
votes
3answers
558 views

Difference between “ad hoc” and “impromptu” [closed]

Is there any difference between "ad hoc" and "impromptu"? Can you find sentences where only one of the words is acceptable and the other is not? And where they are interchangeable? What about the ...
3
votes
2answers
171 views

Contemplate vs consider

After reading an article recently, I wondered when one should use contemplate over consider. I searched for the issue on Google and found that: In that context, they're essentially the same. ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

“Sleep through a single night” vs. “sleep a single night”

For the next two weeks he did not sleep through a single night. Can we recast the sentence as follows? For the next two weeks he did not sleep a single night. That is, is the use of through ...
3
votes
2answers
92 views

Upside down vs downside up

Typically when something is reversed or inverted we say it is "upside down", could we also say that it is also "downside up"? For example... "The picture is upside down" could we also say it ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

“Influences” vs. “influencers”

I want to say :"Identifying influences in different categories is interesting for companies". By "influences" I mean people, who have influence in some categories. Should I use "influences" or ...
3
votes
3answers
162 views

Difference between “larder” and “pantry”

What is the difference between larder and pantry? Is it size? Or content? I found very similar definitions for both terms, something like "a room/place in which food is stored". Which of the words is ...
0
votes
1answer
172 views

Can I end this sentence with “also” or “too”? Which one is right?

Please see the sentences: I scheduled to stay after school with you today, but yesterday I was assigned a detention for today too. I scheduled to stay after school with you today, but ...
3
votes
6answers
770 views

Difference between “funny” and “strange”/“weird”

I noticed that in English the word funny is sometimes used in the meaning of strange or weird. What's the exact difference? What is interesting for me is that you have a single word meaning at the ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Difference between the words of violent criticisms

What is the exact difference between: revile castigate inveigh asperse culminate vituperate vilify In what context are these words used?
1
vote
1answer
61 views

What's the difference between “general” and “generic”?

What is the difference between them? Do they have different meanings? When should I use "general" or "generic"?
0
votes
1answer
78 views

Is there any difference between “invite to” and “invite for”?

Is there any difference between invite to and invite for in terms of usage and meaning? For example: invite someone to lunch, dinner, a party, or a meeting but invite them for a drink or a meal
1
vote
2answers
326 views

“Conventional” vs. “traditional” [closed]

What is the difference between conventional and traditional? E.g.: My grandfather used to live a conventional/traditional life.
1
vote
1answer
94 views

what's the difference between “Indispensable Amino Acid” and “Essential Amino Acid”?

As I have seen several times of the using of those two words in even the same book. But I don't know what's the difference meaning between those two words.
1
vote
4answers
134 views

Can you use obverse/reverse when referring to a sheet of paper?

Is it acceptable to use 'obverse and reverse' when referring to the sides of a loose-leaf sheet of paper? The wikipedia article on, "Obverse and Reverse" stated that: "Obverse and its opposite, ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

Difference between a “self-serving individual” and “self-centered individual” [closed]

Is being "self-serving" the same as being "self-centered"? While looking for an answer to this question, I saw this previous question on the difference between "selfish" and "self-centered". I ...
-1
votes
1answer
154 views

labour v.s. labourer [closed]

What's the difference between them when I mean "worker"? In other word, which one below is right? Companies can barely find young labours in an ageing society. Companies can barely find young ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Initial “See, …” or “Look, …” usage

Which is correct to say 1. "Look , The situation was like that..." or "See, The situation was like that ....". 2. "Look , I am not involved in it..." or "See, I am not involved in ...
3
votes
3answers
100 views

What is the difference between “being in” and “being down”

I've come across both sentences and was wondering if there is any difference in their meaning. Here are the sentences where I met them: To be down: Give me a call if you're down To be in: ...
0
votes
4answers
214 views

Can 'I would say' always replace 'I think'?

There is a question about 'I guess' and one answer is comparing 'I guess', and 'I would say'. I would say characterizes what follows as a personal opinion or judgment: From what I know of him I ...
4
votes
1answer
113 views

“Holy Spirit” or “Holy Ghost”? [closed]

Until today I believed that both terms are basically the same. But our English teacher told us that the correct term is Holy Spirit. Is there any difference between Holy Spirit and Holy Ghost? I ...
1
vote
1answer
104 views

Are “go on”; “go for it”; “Carry on” and “go ahead” synonymous?

I saw “Carry on” vs. “go ahead” A friend of mine said this to me, and it sounded kind weird for me... If you know a better way "go on" I would say If you know a better way "go for it" Are ...
0
votes
1answer
104 views

Is “further” now used for both physical and metaphorical distances?

Is it true that 'further' and 'farther' are becoming interchangeable? He drove further north. His furthest destination to travel is 167 miles. This link says that further is now widely ...
-1
votes
1answer
313 views

Is there difference between acne and pimples?

As title says: Is there difference between acne and pimples? As far as I know "acne" is skin condition, meaning that there are number of various "pimple" types on and under the skin.
0
votes
2answers
161 views

Bunch of girls/Buncha girls

as English isn't my first language, I don't really 'feel' whether bunch of girls/buncha girls is offensive, friendly, etc.? Could you tell me what's the proper meaning of the phrase? I hear it in ...
1
vote
3answers
47 views

Voltage vs. Voltages

Is 'voltages' the plural for voltage? When requesting for someone to check voltage more than once, would you state that you're documenting 'voltages'?
0
votes
1answer
539 views

What is the difference between providing that and provided that? [closed]

Please tell me about this question and give me an example for each one. Is it conjunction or not? Thanks
0
votes
3answers
129 views

What's the difference in being extemporaneous,being spontaneous and being impulsive?

What's the difference in being extemporaneous, being spontaneous and being impulsive? Or, when, where, - in which situation - would you rather use them?
1
vote
2answers
572 views

What is the difference between a variant and a variation?

I designed a logo for a client. He liked the idea it presented, but wanted to see alternative ways to represent its idea, so I came up with several new designs of similar concept. I now have to ...
0
votes
1answer
247 views

“Artificial” vs. “faux” vs. “fake”

Do these words have a different meaning? Should we say artificial sugar or sweetener? Should we say artificial fur or faux fur? Is there a rule that defines the border for artificial/faux/fake? ...
2
votes
3answers
733 views

“Comportment” vs. “deportment”

What is the difference between comportment and deportment? I have tried looking up a comparison, but with very little results. The few discussions I found were contradictory. I also tried looking ...
0
votes
4answers
168 views

House keeping or house cleaning?

I'm a web professional, recently we wanted to make major changes into our web app and one of our colleagues used the word house cleaning. What phrase do you use to say major changes need to be done. ...
0
votes
1answer
78 views

Difference between chastise and lambaste?

Is there a difference between chastise and lambaste? When should one use chastise and when should one use lambaste?
4
votes
3answers
3k views

Difference between “take a taxi” and “get a taxi”

Which of the following is correct? If both are correct, do they have different meanings or usage? Take a taxi/bus/train OR Get a taxi/bus/train
0
votes
1answer
295 views

order of magnitude of words describing the size of a group [closed]

Are there any definitive, or even generally accepted guides which indicate the order of magnitude of: pack party throng rabble horde drove swarm plague There is some agreement that "couple" is 2, ...
1
vote
1answer
125 views

What are the differences between the following sentences containing “surprised”?

I have written four similar sentences using surprised: I was deeply surprised at the news. I was deeply surprised at learning the news. I was deeply surprised at being told the news. I ...
0
votes
1answer
275 views

“Carry on” vs. “go ahead”

I am confused about whether it is okay to say, "Ok, carry on/go ahead with your job then." Any help on this simple issue is highly appreciated.
0
votes
2answers
92 views

“Sign up free” or “Sign up for free” [duplicate]

I've stumbled upon "Sign up free" and "Sign up for free" on different websites. "Sign up free" makes no sense to me. Is it correct? Which one should I use on my website? Thanks.
6
votes
4answers
2k views

What's the difference between “life conditions” and “living conditions”?

What's the difference between life conditions and living conditions? I often use the former. "The life conditions of the Victorian workers", for example.
1
vote
2answers
160 views

Up one's ass vs. In one's ass

Why is stick/shove/etc up one's ass much more common than in/into one's ass?
2
votes
1answer
344 views

“Comical” v. “Comedic”

Is there any semantic distinction between the words comedic and comical? I usually use the former to describe people and the latter to describe things, situations, etc.
1
vote
2answers
3k views

“Nervous” vs. “anxious”

Are these words interchangeable? When would you use one over the other? For example, is it correct to say you "feel nervous" or "feel anxious"? Is it correct to say you are an "anxious person" or a ...
-1
votes
2answers
161 views

“Its color is brown” vs “It is brown in color” describing nouns

I was wondering what the difference between these two similar ways of describing a noun is. Its color is brown. or It is brown in color. If they are both proper usage please explain to me ...