0
votes
0answers
36 views

Starting a sentence with “And so” in a mathematical proof

Inspired by this question, I thought of something more. As Tim says, and I ageree, one more often sees repeated use of "Hence", "Therefore" etc. in a mathematical proof, and not very often do people ...
0
votes
2answers
25 views

Initial “See, …” or “Look, …” usage

Which is correct to say 1. "Look , The situation was like that..." or "See, The situation was like that ....". 2. "Look , I am not involved in it..." or "See, I am not involved in ...
3
votes
3answers
80 views

What is the difference between “being in” and “being down”

I've come across both sentences and was wondering if there is any difference in their meaning. Here are the sentences where I met them: To be down: Give me a call if you're down To be in: ...
0
votes
4answers
109 views

Can 'I would say' always replace 'I think'?

There is a question about 'I guess' and one answer is comparing 'I guess', and 'I would say'. I would say characterizes what follows as a personal opinion or judgment: From what I know of him I ...
4
votes
1answer
97 views

“Holy Spirit” or “Holy Ghost”? [closed]

Until today I believed that both terms are basically the same. But our English teacher told us that the correct term is Holy Spirit. Is there any difference between Holy Spirit and Holy Ghost? I ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

Are “go on”; “go for it”; “Carry on” and “go ahead” synonymous?

I saw “Carry on” vs. “go ahead” A friend of mine said this to me, and it sounded kind weird for me... If you know a better way "go on" I would say If you know a better way "go for it" Are ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Is “further” now used for both physical and metaphorical distances?

Is it true that 'further' and 'farther' are becoming interchangeable? He drove further north. His furthest destination to travel is 167 miles. This link says that further is now widely ...
-1
votes
1answer
138 views

Is there difference between acne and pimples?

As title says: Is there difference between acne and pimples? As far as I know "acne" is skin condition, meaning that there are number of various "pimple" types on and under the skin.
0
votes
2answers
79 views

Bunch of girls/Buncha girls

as English isn't my first language, I don't really 'feel' whether bunch of girls/buncha girls is offensive, friendly, etc.? Could you tell me what's the proper meaning of the phrase? I hear it in ...
1
vote
3answers
40 views

Voltage vs. Voltages

Is 'voltages' the plural for voltage? When requesting for someone to check voltage more than once, would you state that you're documenting 'voltages'?
0
votes
1answer
88 views

What is the difference between providing that and provided that? [closed]

Please tell me about this question and give me an example for each one. Is it conjunction or not? Thanks
0
votes
3answers
91 views

What's the difference in being extemporaneous,being spontaneous and being impulsive?

What's the difference in being extemporaneous, being spontaneous and being impulsive? Or, when, where, - in which situation - would you rather use them?
2
votes
1answer
218 views

What is the difference between a variant and a variation?

I designed a logo for a client. He liked the idea it presented, but wanted to see alternative ways to represent its idea, so I came up with several new designs of similar concept. I now have to ...
0
votes
1answer
124 views

“Artificial” vs. “faux” vs. “fake”

Do these words have a different meaning? Should we say artificial sugar or sweetener? Should we say artificial fur or faux fur? Is there a rule that defines the border for artificial/faux/fake? ...
1
vote
2answers
245 views

“Comportment” vs. “deportment”

What is the difference between comportment and deportment? I have tried looking up a comparison, but with very little results. The few discussions I found were contradictory. I also tried looking ...
0
votes
4answers
133 views

House keeping or house cleaning?

I'm a web professional, recently we wanted to make major changes into our web app and one of our colleagues used the word house cleaning. What phrase do you use to say major changes need to be done. ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Difference between chastise and lambaste?

Is there a difference between chastise and lambaste? When should one use chastise and when should one use lambaste?
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Difference between “take a taxi” and “get a taxi”

Which of the following is correct? If both are correct, do they have different meanings or usage? Take a taxi/bus/train OR Get a taxi/bus/train
-1
votes
1answer
187 views

order of magnitude of words describing the size of a group [closed]

Are there any definitive, or even generally accepted guides which indicate the order of magnitude of: pack party throng rabble horde drove swarm plague There is some agreement that "couple" is 2, ...
1
vote
1answer
105 views

What are the differences between the following sentences containing “surprised”?

I have written four similar sentences using surprised: I was deeply surprised at the news. I was deeply surprised at learning the news. I was deeply surprised at being told the news. I ...
0
votes
1answer
199 views

“Carry on” vs. “go ahead”

I am confused about whether it is okay to say, "Ok, carry on/go ahead with your job then." Any help on this simple issue is highly appreciated.
0
votes
2answers
86 views

“Sign up free” or “Sign up for free” [duplicate]

I've stumbled upon "Sign up free" and "Sign up for free" on different websites. "Sign up free" makes no sense to me. Is it correct? Which one should I use on my website? Thanks.
6
votes
4answers
1k views

What's the difference between “life conditions” and “living conditions”?

What's the difference between life conditions and living conditions? I often use the former. "The life conditions of the Victorian workers", for example.
1
vote
2answers
146 views

Up one's ass vs. In one's ass

Why is stick/shove/etc up one's ass much more common than in/into one's ass?
2
votes
1answer
177 views

“Comical” v. “Comedic”

Is there any semantic distinction between the words comedic and comical? I usually use the former to describe people and the latter to describe things, situations, etc.
0
votes
2answers
1k views

“Nervous” vs. “anxious”

Are these words interchangeable? When would you use one over the other? For example, is it correct to say you "feel nervous" or "feel anxious"? Is it correct to say you are an "anxious person" or a ...
-1
votes
2answers
131 views

“Its color is brown” vs “It is brown in color” describing nouns

I was wondering what the difference between these two similar ways of describing a noun is. Its color is brown. or It is brown in color. If they are both proper usage please explain to me ...
2
votes
1answer
426 views

“Sought” vs. “searched”

Can sought and searched be used interchangeably? As in "we searched for an article" versus "we sought an article". (Or if I got those two examples wrong, but there are correct examples where sought ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

'There seem' or 'there seems' + usage of the word 'seem'

First, I have a question "How words 'seem' and 'there' are used together?" Which is correct: There seem ... or There seems ... Then, I'm am interested in general constructions with the word ...
3
votes
2answers
155 views

“Suffer” vs. “suffer from”

I would like to know the difference between "suffer" and "suffer from". From the dictionary, I cannot distinguish between them. In particular, which of the following should I use: suffer ...
3
votes
4answers
424 views

The difference between “quite” and “enough”

Is there any difference between "quite" and "enough"? Please suggest the proper usage. I'm not quite happy. vs I'm not happy enough.
2
votes
3answers
13k views

When to use “Ok noted”?

I'm a software developer. My situation is, I'm working with my customer (onshore project manager) via chatting using Skype. He helps me to make his side's server available and give me a link to the ...
0
votes
2answers
104 views

“Rules” vs. “principles” [duplicate]

What's the difference between rules and principles? For example, which one is the better fit in the following context? Strict __ govern the clothes we wear.
0
votes
1answer
6k views

“Totally agree” and “completely agree”

What is the difference between totally agree and completely agree? In other words, what is the difference in meaning between totally and completely in such combinations in conversations?
5
votes
2answers
568 views

“Trawling through” or “trolling through”

There are quite a few discussions online about whether one can "trawl through" or "troll through", looking for something. From what I can see, both are fishing terms so both are legitimate in ...
1
vote
1answer
233 views

“feel tired” vs. “am tired”

Which of these two sentences is more appropriate in a given situation? I am tired. I am feeling tired. I know this might be a very childish question, but English is not my first language ...
0
votes
1answer
274 views

Difference between “meeting” and “meet up”

Is this sentence correct? Can we skip the meet up this week?
-2
votes
1answer
198 views

What are the differences between “dudes,” “guys,” and “friends”? [closed]

What are the differences between dudes, guys, and friends?
-1
votes
2answers
10k views

“Housewife” vs. “homemaker” [closed]

What is the difference between housewife and homemaker? When can we use housewife and when can we use homemaker? I am a housewife. I am a homemaker. Which is correct in the above ...
0
votes
1answer
162 views

Should I say I work “for” or “with” my supervisor? [duplicate]

I have heard people saying both "I work for him" and "I work with him" when they are talking about their supervisors. But, since these people were not native English speakers, I could not figure out ...
0
votes
1answer
186 views

“Inspect” vs. “control” [closed]

Which of inspect or control is more appropriate when referring to action checking the operational state of something? Context: Workers are checking the operational state of a billboard with regards ...
8
votes
3answers
1k views

What’s the difference between “line” and “row”?

I’m not exactly sure under which circumstances is line or row the more suitable term. In Portuguese, they both translate to the same word linha, which can be used for both a drawing line or for an ...
1
vote
3answers
641 views

What's the difference between “erroneous” and “wrong”? [closed]

Are these words totally interchangeable? I made the [erroneous/wrong] decision.
0
votes
2answers
86 views

What is the correct use of the word “abuses”?

What is the correct use of the word "abuses"? While the phrase: "Human rights abuses" doesn't seem incorrect, "verbal and physical abuses" does. I am tired, so if I'm being dense please don't be too ...
3
votes
1answer
97 views

“Stoppage” vs “Stopping”

Can "stoppage" and "stopping" be used interchangeably? If not, could someone please provide an example where they would convey dissimilar notions? Do they have any semantic differences? I don't ...
2
votes
1answer
772 views

“Decide on” vs. “decide for”

What's the difference between "decide on something" and "decide for something"? For example, which preposition would you use in the following passage? After more than a decade of disagreement, ...
2
votes
2answers
649 views

Usage of “diary” and “calendar”

The difference between a paper diary and a paper calendar is fairly clear, though either may be used to record an appointmemt. However a computer application is less clear as, for example, MS ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Difference between “meaning of life” and “purpose of life”

I have seen and heard both, but I cannot tell the difference between "meaning of life" and "purpose of life". Could anybody explain it to me? When to use which?
1
vote
2answers
719 views

When to use whence instead of hence

I've come across instances where I felt using both was just fine. The dictionary definition doesn't provide much clarity either. Could someone please clarify the differences between the two?
-3
votes
2answers
236 views

“Troublesome” vs. “annoying” [closed]

What is the difference between "troublesome" and "annoying", especially when used to describe a person?