9
votes
9answers
1k views

A word for old-fashioned, dirty bar/place (spit-and-sawdust)

Is there a (common) single word for an old-fashioned, non-modern, simple, dirty, untidy bar/place ? A noun would be preferable. Details: There is an informal British term: spit-and-sawdust ...
6
votes
1answer
379 views

Processor vs Processer

Is there any difference between "processor" and "processer"? Some spelling dictionaries only have the -or form, and some have both. Is it a US vs UK English thing? Or something else? More ...
1
vote
3answers
70 views

Word for sharing or to encourage sharing

Is there any other word for sharing? or to encourage sharing? Thanks in advance. Edit: I need to write something to encourage sharing information. (Let's share our experiences - something like ...
2
votes
2answers
132 views

I work “in a grocery store” or “at a grocery store” [duplicate]

I am not a native speaker but both sounds good to me. Which one should be more accurate or in fact correct.
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Difference between “take a taxi” and “get a taxi”

Which of the following is correct? If both are correct, do they have different meanings or usage? Take a taxi/bus/train OR Get a taxi/bus/train
4
votes
3answers
4k views

“Elder brother” or “older brother”?

I've read both forms in newspapers and online news: elder brother and older brother. What's the difference between them? When should I use which?
1
vote
3answers
88 views

I need a word encompassing the meaning of free from something

Suppose I have a work to accomplish today, but I am not in the mood to finish it. I need the word to comprehend all these ideas. The sentence to be put in would be like "Request to free me from the ...
0
votes
2answers
4k views

Is it awkward to start an email with “I am [my name]. I am writing to ask you…”?

I saw a job announcement (faculty position), which usually says "questions regarding this position should be addressed to [name and email.]. I want to ask a few questions about the position, and ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

What is the word for “history of the study of the subject”?

Suppose the subject is nutrition. Is there a word for the history of the study of nutrition? Or the history of the study of a science for that matter? I thought it was one of those epi-ology words ...
3
votes
2answers
139 views

“tear apart” or “rip apart” packaging?

What's the best verb to express that I opened the packaging of a product by tearing it off? Tear apart the packaging? Rip the packaging? Or is there any better verb or phrase to be used?
3
votes
2answers
179 views

Metro Station or Subway Station in US?

I am not sure which term is more common when people talk and refer to metro station. Somebody told me you should use subway instead of metro and people use subway in everyday talking. Is this true? I ...
2
votes
0answers
205 views

Tri-Parts Phrasal Verbs and Categories [closed]

There seem to be three categories for tri-part phrasal verbs: genuine non-separable (come up with); flexible in that the final particle can be omitted (brush up (on); mandatory separable (talk (.) ...
2
votes
1answer
341 views

“Perhaps” or “Maybe”?

As a non-native speaker of English, I was once told in London by a learned British man that I should not use 'maybe' for 'perhaps' in the UK, as by doing so, I'd be following an American usage (so ...
2
votes
8answers
7k views

What do you call a person who motivates or inspires?

My choices so far: motivational source inspirational source source of motivation source of inspiration Being a non-native speaker, I don't know which one to use. What I want to say is that ...
5
votes
1answer
158 views

Pool or billiards in 1890s American South?

Which term is more likely to have been used in Georgia around 1893? I found a British website which explains the origin of the modern game known as American pool ...
1
vote
0answers
88 views

What were fedoras called in the 1890s? [closed]

I am aware that fedoras were just coming into fashion in the 1890s. Were they called "fedoras" or was there some other name for them used back then?
3
votes
4answers
526 views

“Hot cakes” or “flapjacks” in 1890s American South?

Which term is more likely to have been used by my main character, a young man from a wealthy Macon, Georgia family, in 1893?
2
votes
3answers
167 views

What word describes the shape of a whirlwind when seen from above?

What word describes the shape of a whirlwind when seen from above? Swirl Whorl Radial The shape they make when seen from above resembles a radial pattern or even a whorl.
2
votes
1answer
89 views

Cologne or toilet water?

I am writing a novel set in 1890s Georgia (United States), and I am wondering whether the main character, a young man of eighteen, would refer to eau de toilette as cologne, toilet water, or something ...
-1
votes
3answers
167 views

“Testification” in US English

The usage of Dieter Wisclieceny’s statements and testifications from the Nuremberg Trials as the basis for the interrogation and trial of Eichmann is also accurate. In Microsoft word, the ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Use of “Pretty cool, huh?”

Would it be grammatically correct to use "Pretty cool, huh?" or would you need to use e.g: "Pretty cool, right?" I think that the "huh" would be asking a "what?", although that doesn't make sense in ...
1
vote
2answers
289 views

Prepositions and Corners

Does one use "on" or "at" in the following: Kate met him at the corner Kate met him on the corner. Or are they the same?
10
votes
3answers
424 views

“You are likely to [verb]” vs. “you are like to [verb]”

In a recent answer to another question, a fellow poster just used the following turn of phrase: The nearest you’re like to get is [word][.] I only ever saw and used "you’re likely to..." myself, ...
1
vote
3answers
21k views

“Please note” vs. “please notice” [closed]

When I'm writing a text and want to ask the reader to pay close attention to a point, should I write "Please note" or "Please notice"? Is there any difference?
4
votes
4answers
1k views

Do Americans use the term “garburator” or is there a better equivalent?

Is it obsolete to use the term garburator to refer to a garbage disposal unit in a kitchen? If it is, do we have a better term to replace it with? Also, what is the etymology of this word?
1
vote
4answers
1k views

Synonyms for “curate” in US English

What synonyms are there for "curate", as in (to quote here) to select, organize, and present (suitable content, typically for online or computational use), using professional or expert knowledge ...
2
votes
2answers
121 views

US English — “primary grains being produced” vs. “major cereals being produced”

I am correcting a Spanish-to-English translation that states, The primary grains being produced in the world are maize, wheat, rice, barley, sorghum and oats. I would prefer to use cereals ...
2
votes
7answers
1k views

US and UK English: queue or waiting line?

What do you usually say, depending on the context and depending if it's US or UK English? wait in line or queue
1
vote
2answers
265 views

What is more commonly used in US? “Cum Laude” or “With Honors”?

I understand that the terms Cum Laude and With Honors are interchangeable, but which one is better understood in US and more commonly used?
0
votes
3answers
1k views

“Acted in the benefit of ” vs. “acted for the benefit of ” vs. “acted to the benefit of ”

I am not sure about this quote: As to whether the president acted for the benefit of the majority, 35 percent of the respondents said that he did not, 30 percent that he only partly acted in the ...
2
votes
1answer
9k views

Correct way of saying “errands to run” [closed]

Which is the correct way to tell someone that I have errands to run? Are all of these fine to say in person and in an email? I got some errands to run or is it I have errands to run or ...
0
votes
3answers
810 views

Use “underway” or “under way” as an adverb?

Is it proper to use underway as an adverb? Or should under way be used? Merriam-Webster defines underway as an adjective and under way as an adverb. The Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & ...
8
votes
6answers
8k views

Is there a different understanding of “rubber” in British and American English?

I was well aware of the different meanings of rubber, not least because there are the same definitions in my mother-tongue. However, while reading a text about differences between British and American ...
0
votes
1answer
164 views

What do you call those stuff published in craigslist.com?

I was thinking about the word of those things which are published in craigslist.com and whether if I should call them ads? list? commercials? notice? promotion? flyers? or something else. To clear ...
4
votes
3answers
5k views

“Ground floor” vs. “first floor”

Is the bottom-most floor (on ground level not the basement) "ground floor" or "first floor" in America?
5
votes
3answers
11k views

“Invite” vs. “invitation”

I hear a lot of people saying "Send me an invite". I always thought that it was an 'invitation'. Is "sending one an invite" accepted usage? Or is it incorrect? If I need to get my wedding invitation ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

What is the correct relative pronoun for “government”?

What is the correct relative pronoun for "government"? Which of the following phrases is correct? I am writing for an American [English] audience. The Queensland Government, who licenses several ...
9
votes
6answers
11k views

“On/at/for/over the weekend” in American English

Some sources say that "at the weekend" is wrong, while other ones say it's correct. Which form is acceptable in American English? On Saturdays her sister Ann usually comes to stay with Mary ...
4
votes
2answers
5k views

“In college” versus “at college” versus “at university” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which one is more correct: “works at a university” or “works in a university”? It seems that only in the U.S. one says that they are or were "in ...
1
vote
0answers
156 views

Does the word “excitation” exist? [closed]

I've recently listened to an old hit by the Beach Boys and I was surprised by the lyrics where the word "excitation" is so frequently repeated. Does it really exist, perhaps as a regional term? I ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

“Have a breakfast” or “eat a breakfast” in AmE

Which expression do Americans prefer, have a breakfast or eat a breakfast?
7
votes
6answers
13k views

'Expired' or 'Passed away'?

When someone dies, do we say they expired or passed away? Does the word expired give any more respect when used? Or less respect than passed away?
4
votes
2answers
261 views

Does “Stop aping!” sound natural?

A teenager is acting in a very silly and annoying way making faces and rapidly changing his postures. His father gets really annoyed by it and tells him "Stop aping!" Does "Stop aping!" go okay here ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

“And to you” or “you too”?

I really like to chat with English folks, so I have wished them Merry Christmas. To my surprise I have noticed the following pattern — the British answered "and to you", but Americans "you too". The ...
9
votes
4answers
3k views

“Facade” vs. “façade”

I know that both facade and façade are valid in British English. Is that also true for American English? Or should facade be used when writing something for American customers? This is something that ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Is this an example of litotes?

In Macbeth's Tomorrow speech To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day, To the last syllable of recorded time; And all our yesterdays have lighted ...
8
votes
3answers
18k views

“Checked shirt” vs “check shirt”

My son is learning English as a foreign language and I notice a mixture of British and American words in his vocab lists. Is there such thing as a checked shirt, or should it be a check shirt?
2
votes
1answer
189 views

“Is Ken home?” or “Is Ken at home?”

When you ask someone if your buddy Ken is at home or not, what is the correct question, "Is Ken home?" or "Is Ken at home?"? I'm pretty sure both of those are correct, since I've seen a lot of times ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

“Aeroplane” or “Airplane” - Which are people more familiar with? [closed]

I'm considering creating an application which has the word "Aeroplane" in the title. However, I have noticed in Google the following trend: Aeroplane: 16,700,000 results Airplane: 119,000,000 ...
0
votes
1answer
434 views

Is it less than $100 or under $100? Is it more than $100 or is it over $100?

I am building a web site and need to clarify something for a non-U.S. customer. It's whether to use "less than/more than" or "under/over". items less than $100.00 items from $100.00 to $500.00 ...