0
votes
2answers
57 views

Unforgettable or Memorable?

I was writing a thank you letter to someone I had good time with. I was fighting between two adjectives to describe the experience. These are: 1. unforgettable, 2. memorable. The questions that I was ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

What is the difference between “super” and “superb”?

I have seen usage of both super and superb. I also searched for meaning of these two words and found they are almost identical. Example sentences - She is a super girl. His performance in the last ...
3
votes
6answers
508 views

What is an adjective for “requires a lot of work”? [closed]

For example, Starting a new business requires a lot of work. What would be an adjective in: Starting a new business is _.
16
votes
17answers
3k views

Appropriate word for a young person who behaves like a cynical old person?

What is an appropriate term for a young person (child, or teenager) whose words and actions mimic that of a much older person from a previous generation? Such a youngster would demonstrate strong ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Why do Americans seem to use the word “delicious” less often than I do?

I am a foreigner and now I am in America. I always use the word delicious whenever I like food. For example: This meat is so delicious! But one of my friends, who is not a native speaker, once ...
13
votes
4answers
563 views

Rule for when to use “thin” versus “narrow”

My 5-year-old asked this morning if you would say a road was "thin" or "narrow". We had no difficulty telling her she should use "narrow" in that case, but couldn't explain why. We found it ...
-1
votes
1answer
43 views

untypical, atypical, nontypical

I'm trying to label customer data with a word describing how typical they are. There is basically 3 possible values: typical, temporarily untypical, untypical. But I'm not sure if "untypical" is the ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

When to use the abverbial form of maximal: maximally?

Could the following sentence considered to be a correct use case of the adverbial form of the word maximal in English? Use underflow to set the maximally possible value of used datatype. When ...
1
vote
3answers
65 views

a word for an unfamiliar situation

Is there a single word for an unfamiliar situation or a better way of wording this? If a situation is unfamiliar to you.
0
votes
3answers
67 views

Single word for person entitled to receive a sales commission

I need a fairly specific single word for a person who is entitled to receive a sales commission. "Agent" for example isn't specific enough. A short phrase is also usable. Adjectives ditto. The ...
1
vote
3answers
115 views

Is there a word for someone born in the UK?

While watching the World Cup game a few minutes ago, I was wondering what if the United Kingdom - and not England - had a National Team, with English, Scottish, Welsh, and Northern Ireland players ...
-1
votes
1answer
76 views

“Putative” vs. “surrogate” [closed]

How similar or different is "putative" to "surrogate"? The term "surrogate father" is common, "putative father" is fairly so, too. But what may be the difference in connotation?
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Qualifying a profile

Which of these adjectives is better used to qualify a profile (the width of an elongated object, such as in crossing profile)? low or small large or high Low crossing profile seems more common ...
5
votes
6answers
441 views

A word describes the person whose homeland/origins cannot be assurely identified

I am looking for adjective describes the person whose origins cannot be identified based on his appearance features, accent, background ... etc. Some people has typical appearance features of middle ...
2
votes
1answer
101 views

Can someone provide an explanation regarding the etymology of the adjective “hell-bent?”

It's etymology is given as: hell-bent, 1835, U.S., originally slang, from hell + bent How do the the words "hell + bent," when taken together, form the definition "determined to achieve ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Demonstrated through? [closed]

Is this sentence correct? "Excellent communication, organizational, and leadership skills demonstrated through various awards and volunteer activities."
3
votes
6answers
939 views

Difference between “funny” and “strange”/“weird”

I noticed that in English the word funny is sometimes used in the meaning of strange or weird. What's the exact difference? What is interesting for me is that you have a single word meaning at the ...
2
votes
4answers
190 views

What is the difference between “graphic” and “graphical” as adjectives?

Are the two adjectives completely interchangeable, or is there a distinction between them? Does it matter which I choose?
0
votes
2answers
1k views

“More drunk” or “drunker”?

I am at a party. I drink wine till I'm drunk. Then I drink some more. So am I more drunk now, or drunker?
1
vote
2answers
462 views

“Conventional” vs. “traditional” [closed]

What is the difference between conventional and traditional? E.g.: My grandfather used to live a conventional/traditional life.
8
votes
6answers
1k views

Using “decadent” to describe a building or town in neglect or ruin

I have often seen decadent used to refer to a non-physical state, like a person who is spiritually or morally decadent. Could decadent be applied to something physical like a building or a town to ...
2
votes
2answers
249 views

Do I take a small nap or a light nap?

I heard a friends say that he's going to take a small nap. Is this correct usage? I thought we only take light naps.
0
votes
3answers
278 views

Is there a difference between “anatomic” and “anatomical”?

I want to say "anatomical context". Google tells me that anatomical in that context is preferred. An online dictionary claimed that American English does not have anatomic but only knows anatomical.
2
votes
7answers
2k views

What's an adjective that means “has high expectations”

If you were to describe a person as someone who has high expectations or standards (of their work, peers, or subordinates), what word would you use? "Demanding" is the closest I have come but that's ...
1
vote
5answers
219 views

I got first place in a competition where it's possible to tie. How would I distinguish that I was an untied first?

I would like to avoid using the phrase "untied first" unless that is actually the accepted way to say it.
4
votes
18answers
2k views

What is the word meaning “going on and on for miles and miles”?

Edit: I was walking down an intolerably long sidewalk one day, and every time a mounted another hill, I saw more of it seeming to stretch out before me. It got me to thinking: is there a word for ...
1
vote
4answers
1k views

single word adjective for 'temperature-related'

As temporal is the adjective which describes things relating to time, is there such a word for temperature? The hyphenated 'temperature-related' works, but it is not a single word. For context, I'm ...
2
votes
3answers
224 views

Is there a word describing someone who is ignorant in the ways of Science?

I am not sure if dogmatic or doctrinaire covers it, but I am looking for a word to describe someone (like a politician) who is willfully unknowing of how the scientific method works and what science ...
2
votes
2answers
306 views

What is the difference between the adjectives/adverbs “broad” and “wide”? the nouns “breadth” and “width”? [duplicate]

Broad and wide are near synonyms but only near, since "a broad smile" is a more common collocation than "a wide smile", and you can say "eyes wide open" but not "eyes broad open". Breadth and width ...
2
votes
7answers
341 views

Adjacent means side-by-side. What's the word for behind-one-another?

Example: rows 9 and 10 in the theatre are ??? rows. Alternatively: rows 9 an 10 are ???-ly adjacent (while seats B and C are laterally adjacent). There are words like subsequent, consecutive, etc., ...
2
votes
2answers
81 views

Use of “Afghani” as an adjective

So we know that the noun "Afghan" is preferred over "Afghani" when it comes to describing the people of Afghanistan, but what's the scoop for using it as an adjective? For example, is saying an ...
-1
votes
1answer
213 views

“Too low for the price” or “too less for the price” [closed]

Too low for the price Too less for the price Please suggest which one is correct grammatically. Scenarios: The cost for 15 minute show was Rupees 50. It is too low for the price. I ...
0
votes
1answer
317 views

“Artificial” vs. “faux” vs. “fake”

Do these words have a different meaning? Should we say artificial sugar or sweetener? Should we say artificial fur or faux fur? Is there a rule that defines the border for artificial/faux/fake? ...
-1
votes
2answers
116 views

Inconsecutive or nonconsecutive or …? [closed]

I want to say that the data is not like 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159 but can be 154, 156, 157, 159. How do I negate the word "consecutive"? I was not able to find it in the dictionary. I have found ...
1
vote
5answers
258 views

Is it “to be left free to do something” or “to be let free to do something”?

I know "to leave someone alone" and "to let someone be on their own". What happens when the adjective is followed by a verb (in the infinitive)? Is it "*Leave me free to do whatever I want." / "*I ...
1
vote
4answers
686 views

Word for “what-if scenarios”

What is the English word that best captures "what if" situation? Something along the lines of "What if something goes wrong". It is close to being pessimistic. But pessimistic is too negative. I am ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Calendric vs Calendrical

When choosing an adjective to refer to the nature of a calendar system, such as how we have months of varying length, is it more appropriate to use calendric or calendrical? Is there any difference, ...
5
votes
5answers
382 views

Does a laser “etch” things, or does it “engrave” them?

Which (if any) of these adjectives would you use for describing a surface that has been cut using a laser beam: a laser-etched surface a laser-engraved surface a laser-(something else) surface a ...
3
votes
2answers
808 views

“High aspirations” vs. “large aspirations”

When you intend to say someone has a strong desire to achieve something high or great, is it proper to say they have "high aspirations"? Or would it be "large aspirations", or something else?
-1
votes
2answers
87 views

“Intense stress” vs. “high stress”

Capable of performing under intense stress without compromising quality of service. Capable of performing under high stress without compromising quality of service. Which is best suited ...
0
votes
3answers
9k views

“As evidenced by” or “as evident by”?

I have this sentence: Group theory is one of my favourite areas in mathematics, as evidenced by the fact that I chose to do two group theory modules in my undergraduate course. I am wondering if ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

“Is missing” vs. “is missed” [closed]

I was wondering why we say "something is missing" instead of "something is missed"? If missed is an adjective then why we use it that way? E.g.: "The sword is missing".
4
votes
3answers
12k views

“Elder brother” or “older brother”?

I've read both forms in newspapers and online news: elder brother and older brother. What's the difference between them? When should I use which?
1
vote
1answer
68 views

What is the difference between 'The Germany National team' and 'the German national team'? [duplicate]

I can't say I get it. I think the difference is: 'The Germany National team' is team which represents Germany as a country. And it is its formal title. 'the German national team' is team which ...
3
votes
1answer
107 views

Why is there “Germany National Team”, not “German National Team”?

Why is the team from Germany called "Germany National Team", not "German National Team"? On official Internet sites, it is the same for every official national team; Germany National, France National, ...
0
votes
1answer
129 views

“Technology” is to “technical” as “memory” is to what?

I'm writing a sentence about the job of the memory and am characterizing absorption with memory. How do I say "memorical absorption" correctly? Memorial sounds like a noun...
1
vote
1answer
101 views

“Hierarchical” vs. “hierarchic”

When do you use hierarchical and when hierarchic? For example, hierarchical database sounds much more native to me, even as a non-native English speaker. But why isn't it hierarchic database? Edit: ...
3
votes
3answers
4k views

Should I write: “areas becoming denser” or “more dense”?

I am trying to describe how cities have been affected by the growing population in terms of the density of bodies. This is how I have it at the moment but I am unsure whether it should be "more ...
6
votes
4answers
3k views

What's the difference between “life conditions” and “living conditions”?

What's the difference between life conditions and living conditions? I often use the former. "The life conditions of the Victorian workers", for example.
1
vote
2answers
222 views

Is “heartfelt” reserved for sad moments, or can it be used for happy ones?

I'm writing an email about something nice (a newborn child), and was about to use the word "heartfelt". Just then, I noticed I may have heard the word almost exclusively in the context of a sad ...