This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning.

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0
votes
3answers
41 views

What's the difference between “increased” and “increasing”?

What's the difference between "at an increased rate" and "at an increasing rate". It seems to me both of these are correct and no difference. Am I right?
2
votes
0answers
344 views

would you ask someone to drive safe or to drive safely? [duplicate]

When someone is going to drive their car somewhere, I always used to say "drive safely" to them. Recently I was told I should say "drive safe." Which is correct? So it's about when to use the word ...
-1
votes
0answers
25 views

“[all] over the world” vs “in the world”

Could one help me with good examples wich show what is the difference between "[all] over the world" and "in the world"? Thanks in advance. Upd: found some piece of info: ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Comparator vs. Comparative [on hold]

I want to say people have different ways of evaluating a proposition. Which of the following sentences is more suitable for this context? People use different comparator functions for evaluating ...
-3
votes
0answers
31 views

Polite reminder for some (pending) favour [on hold]

In formal writing, what would be a good/polite way to say that you are about to ask someone a favour, especially if that favour is not a new one, but something you already asked (but perhaps for some ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

“Curious as to who” vs. “curious of who”

I'm curious as to who you are. I'm curious of who you are. The person is anonymous and I'm just wondering who it is.
1
vote
3answers
56 views

What would be an exact word to describe taking solace in other's misfortune, knowing one is not alone in facing it?

Schadenfreude implies deriving 'pleasure' in other's misfortune but what I am looking for is a word where one derives comfort that one's misfortune is faced by others as well. For instance, knowing at ...
-1
votes
2answers
25 views

“Table of Contents” vs. “Contents”

I'm a student and about to write my first scientific paper in English. I'm currently not sure how to name the "table of contents". The dictionary says that "Contents" is more popular, but I have seen ...
0
votes
3answers
52 views

“Sponsoring” without implying funding

I am trying to replace the term "sponsored" in the following context, with a better term that does not imply receiving funds or support of any kind. Project X was sponsored by Company Y. Any ...
-1
votes
1answer
31 views

Is there a better title or a word for Computer Lab Assistant?

Is there a better title or a word for Computer Lab Assistant? A title which would make these designation sound professional and more respectable.
1
vote
3answers
51 views

What is the antonym of “isolated” in the context of chemical substance?

I am looking for a word which would mean "not an isolated substance". I would use "blend" or "mixture", but these would imply that the components where isolated in the first place and then blended ...
2
votes
4answers
56 views

Which of “I’d rather it be/were you” is/are correct?

Which of these is correct and why? I’d rather it be you. I’d rather it were you.
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Is this the right way of framing the sentence

I am preparing my resume and I would like to have your opinion on the grammatical correctness of the following sentences. Taught Laboratory sessions, graded home works, exams for PH 101 (Course ...
3
votes
10answers
237 views

Word for a given situation

In the spirit of The Big Bang TV show titles I am looking for a word to use in a particular situation. First, there's a joke that sets up the scenario. 2 guys camping. They are barefoot by the fire. ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

aberration vs aberrance vs aberrancy

All three nouns are derived from aberrant, the latter two are not used often I suppose considering that spell check considered them misspelt. What are the difference between the three? Are they ...
8
votes
12answers
1k views

An adjective or noun for someone who “has a lot of gall”?

What would be a suitable term for someone who has a lot of gall or has the gall to? Specifically someone who has wronged you or yours, or taken something from you, and should be repentant (and ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

verb of 'remediation' (no such thing as 'remediated')

As in the sentence: The pill, in combination with a lot of water, remediated the [effects of the] alcohol. I know there's no such word, only remediation, but I wish it was a word, because it ...
-1
votes
0answers
29 views

my first summer assignment and i want it to be as perfect as possible. does this sound alright?

"Which character seems to you most responsible for the sufferings of the main characters in the story? Explain. Include specific text references to support your ideas." The author describes ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

is the grammar correct? and do i need to add more? [on hold]

Dimmesdale’s final confession was courageous, but if he really was to be truly courageous about the confession then he would of confessed seven years ago. He would of had a better life, and not feel ...
0
votes
2answers
45 views

A phrase to replace “you use” in this sentence

I'm trying to ask a question to a student, but I really want to avoid using the phrase "you use". I still want to address the student directly but "you use" just feels awkward and clumsy. The sentence ...
1
vote
1answer
16 views

Should I use 'health check' or 'healthcheck'?

I don't know if this adds anything, but the context is computer software where a component checks the health of the system and produces a report. I don't know whether it's a 'Health Check Feature' or ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Verb when citing statistics ex. “one in nine Americans (work or works) in sales”

When I read the following sentence: According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, one in nine Americans works in sales. I believe work sounds better than works. Experts and wordsmiths, ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

What is meant by “ Scorpions opened for upcoming British band UFO.”

Well I've seen that sentence in wiki; an article about a rock band called Scorpions. I'm a little bit confusing on the verb used in this sentence. Scorpions opened for upcoming band UFO. What does ...
4
votes
2answers
77 views

What's an adjective to describe something “Of or relating to a row”?

Columnal: "Columnar" Columnar: "of, relating to, resembling, or characterized by columns" Tabular: "of, relating to, or arranged in a table"
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Where can I get a collection of “word spectrums”?

I understand that the The Oxford American Writer's Thesaurus includes "word spectrums" (see illustration below) for a number of words. Is there another source for such type of data? That is, I want ...
0
votes
2answers
47 views

word choice: someone who sticks with their group

I'm trying to find a word to fit in this context: you are a sitting _____ I want the word to show they are a follower in a teenage girl group. Like one with a head girl and the person I'm describing ...
3
votes
6answers
160 views

A word for an explosion of emotion

When I was reading P.S Your Cat is Dead by James Kirkwood, I remember stumbling upon a single word that meant an explosion of positive emotion, but I can't recall what that word was. The word had a ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Can i say “Advanced Default Interface”/“Advanced Classic Interface”? [closed]

For people with native English, could you please help me. Can I say "Advanced Default/Classic Interface" in English, and if it's correct or acceptable? I'm building modifications to existing software ...
0
votes
2answers
89 views

How to reply when someone says 'you deserve this'

I always wonder if it is okay to reply with just a 'Thanks' when someone says 'you deserve this' or 'you have done a great job'. Can someone please advise me about whether saying 'Thanks' and leaving ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

What is it called when you lose a tooth but still have most remaining ones?

I know the word toothless means, according to Google: having no teeth, typically through old age. I'm wondering if a kid or an adult loses one or two teeth is also called toothless. As I ...
0
votes
1answer
84 views

Common word for two people who want to meet but are not acquaintances

I'm looking for a word to describe two people (instructor and student), who are trying to find time to met each other. Preferably one or two word expression.
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Is there any difference between 'artfully' and 'artistically'? [closed]

Is there any difference between 'artfully' and 'artistically'? e.g., are there any subtle differences between an 'artfully plated' dish and an 'artistically plated' one?
-1
votes
0answers
19 views

What's the question that brings the answer “seventh day of the year”? [duplicate]

I'm not a native speaker so I was wondering what's the question one might ask that brings the answer e.g. "32nd day of the year" ?
0
votes
2answers
95 views

It's a pity / shame / unfortunate

Dear native speakers of British / American English, I often find myself in the situation when I have to say one of these but then get confused about the choice of word. Is there any difference in ...
1
vote
2answers
38 views

Can a “program” “engage in research”?

This is regarding a sentence describing a graduate program at a university. I am pretty sure this is incorrect, but I would like to know why: This program engages in research and educates on ...
-2
votes
1answer
71 views

everything was up to my expectation [closed]

I received the phone and that I liked it and everything was up to my expectation.
0
votes
4answers
60 views

needless/redundant cinema?

If a director produces awful films, which he would better spare the world--can one call it "needless cinema"? or maybe "redundant cinema"? Or (if both sound bad), which word would be more suitable to ...
2
votes
2answers
86 views

What's the difference between “scribbled” and “scribbled down”?

Example: Scott scribbled a few words. Scott scribbled down a few words. What's the difference? I checked on Google Books and it seems like "scribbled a few words" is often immediately ...
0
votes
2answers
34 views

is this expression “think big and take risk rather than think small and take safe” ok?

I want to express this sentence Should young people think big and take risk rather than think small and take safe? So, think big >< think small & take risk >< take safe So, is the ...
-1
votes
2answers
65 views

Objects which are badly described by their names [closed]

I am looking for objects which have descriptions opposite or contradictory to their names. For example a black box flight recorder is orange. A marine toilet is a called a head. I am giving a humorous ...
1
vote
2answers
23 views

This contract clause […] that I have this-and-that right

This contract clause [...] that I have this-and-that right. which of the following can I use instead of the [...]? "says"? "stipulates"? "dictates"? "mandates"? something else?
0
votes
2answers
57 views

‘Went for a run’ vs. ‘went on a run’

I would like to know what's the difference between: I went for a run today I went on a run today. And when it's correct to apply each of those. Thanks a ton. Pablo.
1
vote
4answers
47 views

Gravity pull vs. gravitational pull

I've been reading "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People" by Stephen R. Covey and I feel like he's misusing the word gravity in a couple of sentences. "Habits too, have tremendous gravity ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Acronyms in formal writing [closed]

I'm writing a formal essay, in which I use the acronym "US" a lot. Is this acceptable or should I write "United States" instead?
2
votes
5answers
104 views

An adjective that would subtly imply that the criticism is not a personal grudge

I have expressed disapproval of sb/sth and my professor has escalated the issue to the management stating behavioral issues. I am writing a letter explaining what went wrong. I want to state that ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

Diction related to these words? [closed]

What group of words are related to these concepts: Xenophobia Zeitgeist Parochial Antipathy In the context of describing someone against cultural integration, against new worlds..etc
0
votes
3answers
78 views

“I feel stressed” or “I feel stressful”? Which one is correct? [closed]

I say "I feel stressful" but my teacher, a native speaker of English, says that I should say "I feel stressed". Both stressful and stressed are adjective. Which is correct, I feel stressed or I ...
-2
votes
2answers
79 views

Why do native speakers often use delexical structures? [closed]

I am aware that native speakers use "I made a decision" more often than " I decided." and "I took a walk." more often than "I walked." Why do native speakers use such structures?
2
votes
2answers
42 views

Have I used the word “manifests” correctly?

Have I used the word "manifests" in this sentence correctly? The American Dream manifests the opportunity for success regardless of social class or background; however, Alex Gibney’s Park Avenue ...
2
votes
1answer
51 views

gynecological or gynecologic?

I often write medical copy and have always used 'gynecologic' as the descriptor, as in 'gynecologic oncologist' or 'gynecologic disorders.' However, I am editing something where the writer uses ...