A vocabulary is the body of words used in a particular language.

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Is there a word for the value that you compare against a threshold value?

I am writing some software where I count some values and compare it to a threshold. Then if it is below the threshold the value will be highlighted. Is there a specific word for the value that gets ...
2
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4answers
158 views

differentiating between all that and what

Original (extracted from the book The Scarlet Letter): Like all that pertains to crime, it seemed never to have known a youthful era. My own rephrased sentences: Like whatever that pertains ...
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4answers
115 views

What do you call someone who is good at their job?

What do you call someone who is good at their job? For example: how would you describe an optometrist/ophthalmologist who is really good at what they do?
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3answers
56 views

How can I express these concepts using a single word?

I need help with few English words. I'm writing the article about online services and I am stuck. How to say using one word: a) a person who posts a job (like a person who writes an advert on ...
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3answers
186 views

root words and affixes lead to a limitless vocabulary?

Could anyone explain how a solid knowledge about root words and affixes ( which can alter words meaning presumably ) boosts one's vocabulary? I want to know how it works? I've read somewhere that good ...
3
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2answers
156 views

The term for a long sentence which ends with the key element

I recall from my youth a term for a long sentence which hid its meaning or point until the very end. it was used often in academic writing (and since I was doing much academic writing, I used this ...
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2answers
51 views

What is the difference between “part” and “component”?

Can a part mean something that (along with other things) makes up a whole, apart from meaning a piece of something? Can then part always substitute component?
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2answers
46 views

A word for self answering question

What is the word for a question that answers itself? For example quote Where must we go... we who wander this wasteland in search of our better selves is self answering.
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2answers
35 views

What does “the exposed nail” mean?

"I was the exposed nail in the meeting room." What does "the exposed nail" mean in the context?
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1answer
50 views

Word for a statement that embodies its own 'theme'?

eg, "People over-generalize." Sort of, 'autological', for sentences.
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1answer
87 views

“It was a truly amazing experience” vs “It was truly an amazing experience”

Is there much of a difference between these two sentences? It was a truly amazing experience. It was truly an amazing experience.
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1answer
87 views

Is there a word for “near in time” (both past & future) that doesn't also imply geographical proximity?

I'm currently writing a program that finds the "nearest sensible job", in terms of time. The only problem is that that phrase could also mean that the program is finding the nearest geographical job. ...
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1answer
55 views

Name for presenting two arguments and letting the reader make their own decision?

As the title says, is there word for presenting two arguments and letting the reader draw their own conclusions from that? For example, let's say that someone has asked for my thoughts on restaurants ...
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1answer
118 views

Word for belief or prejudice that is held, but it is not conscious

I remember reading about an idea of a belief or prejudice that is subconscious. It had a prefix, and it was something like: belief -> alief or prejudice -> ajudice But I can't remember the ...
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1answer
81 views

University research or Academic research

What do you call researches that are carried out in the universities as thesis or...? academic researches university researches researches in university
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1answer
25 views

double drift of stars

I read the following sentence "They seemed like a double drift of stars, streaming through space." In this passage: "...Then this blood began to change too. Instead of a continuous liquid ...
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1answer
74 views

To “opt-out” or to “withdraw”?

Which is more formal in register, opt-out of something or withdraw from something? Are there any more formal ways to phrase the idea?
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1answer
130 views

Difference between “turns out” and “turns out to be”

I'm not a native English speaker, hence I'm a little confused here. I want to know the difference between the two and also correct me if I'm saying it wrong here "It's turns out to be a conspiracy ...
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1answer
217 views

What is the difference between “way of thinking” vs “the way they think”

I am writing a short description of a social experiement. The objective is to get a better idea of the way people think. I have some troubles to understand the difference between those two phrases: ...
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1answer
1k views

What's a better way of saying “rarely used”

I'm writing an article about using rarely used English words and how to learn and use them. As an example I'd like to find an alternate way of saying "rarely used" I believe there should be one word ...
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1answer
835 views

What does “can be said to do / to be” something mean?

The various modern revolutions in physics, in psychology, in politics, even in literary style, have not escaped his intelligent notice, but they can scarcely be said to have influenced him deeply. ...
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0answers
210 views

The antonym of Schadenfreude is “fribbly” - the joy in other people's joy. What is the origin of this new meaning?

For many years the word fribbly has been used, in various communities as the antonym of Schadenfreude. Rather than harm-joy or "pleasure derived from the misfortunes of others". Fribbly is "Joy-Joy" ...
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0answers
27 views

Word for cutting a sentence in half the rest of the meaning inferred

Is there any word for cutting off a sentence on purpose when the rest of the sentence can be inferred? I see this used sometimes when someone is talking about a grave danger. It is sometimes finished ...
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0answers
22 views

Differences between: “prior”, “ precede”, “predate”, “in advance” and “former”

I am struggling with the exact meanings of these words. In the dictionary they all seem to be connected to the idea of "previous". But I don't know which word I should use and in which context. ...
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14 views

question about away from

Whats meaning of “ away from ” in the sentence : a move away from traditional industries such as coal mining .please ? can you explain meaning the sentence , please . Thank you so much
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0answers
25 views

Word describing something as “useful, handy, worth it” in reference to receiving a gift for it

How do you say something (like a hobby) was "useful" or "handy" when you've received a gift for it? I feel like those words imply I deserved a gift, which is not true.
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0answers
43 views

word for Father's responsibilities / duties?

I'm in the process of writing out my family constitution for our marriage, basically it's a book about family goals, family member rights and duties, financial and academic expectations etc. It is a ...
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0answers
46 views

Colloquial definitions of 'nice', possible alternatives?

I (and my family) use the word 'nice' in a very particular way which I seem to have trouble conveying to other people; so I've come here to see if there is anything remotely analogous. I describe ...
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44 views

Burn a hole in the road?

my question is: In Marry The Night's lyrics, Lady Gaga sings "I'm gonna burn a hole in the road". Why is that? I've heard the expression "on the road" but not "in the road". I don't speak English ...
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0answers
31 views

what is the difference between need and necessitate?

both are verb and necessitate is formal. two are all related with the adjective necessary. Mostly people use need in daily life. what is the difference?
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0answers
52 views

What do you call a razor knife when the blade is removed?

The definition of a knife is a blade attached to a handle or something like that. I argue that when the blade is removed from a razor knife with a removable blade, then it isn't a knife anymore until ...
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0answers
25 views

“pumphead” - why?

Can anybody tell me where the expression "pumphead" comes from? Why do doctors use it? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postperfusion_syndrome Thanks!
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0answers
46 views

Question about phone conversation

What should I say on the phone? Is it, Where are you calling from? or From where are you calling? If there is any alternative, please do share.Thanks
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0answers
64 views

Can the adjective “sexist” be replaced by “chauvinistic” in this context?

Can chauvinistic denote the same meaning as sexist in this sentence? The nature of these rituals generates a sexist mentality among the new members.
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249 views

Word/Phrase List to Describe Different Types of Relationships

The Swedish language has a big list of the words which describe the various types of the relationships. Many of those words just were coined recently. There is even the word which describes the people ...
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86 views

A verb like “delegate,” but it moves in the opposite direction

In short, I was thinking about how much of the time someone will come to me with a task that I just don't have the industry knowledge to perform, so I have to bring it to my boss. I was thinking it ...
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0answers
100 views

Word for someone who is typing and then erases what they've written?

I remember reading about this word once and can no longer find it. The word is for a person who is repeatedly typing something to you in a chat service (that shows when they are typing) but then ...
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0answers
66 views

“Leave” doing sth meaning stop / give up

Is it correct to say "leave a course" (stop doing it, give it up)? e.g. I took an English course but after some time I left if .