A vocabulary is the body of words used in a particular language.

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2answers
54 views

How to improve my English? [on hold]

To improve my vocabulary, I read a lot of novels and learned more than few new words. Though I am able to comprehend the word when I see them, I am unable to use (or recall) them when needed. What ...
0
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1answer
38 views

Is `composability` a proper word in English?

Is composability a proper word in English ? Suppose I have a set of elements and can compose them to create different structures. May I call this property of the set "composability" ?
2
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1answer
375 views

Role of a person in charge of the casting of a film

Let's say this is the information related to a film: Written by: John Doe Produced by: Mary James Casting by: Peter Smith, Sarah Jones ... Then: John Doe is a writer. Mary James is a ...
5
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5answers
405 views

What do you call it when the current generation thinks the previous is better/more poetic?

It's referred to as the "allure of nostalgia" in the wiki entry for Midnight in Paris.
17
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11answers
6k views

What do you call a group of people that move a lot?

I can't think of the word to describe it. Something similar to "wanderer" or "roamer". It's often used to describe people that don't stay in one place... not "migratory"...
5
votes
4answers
443 views

Can a person's name be used to represent a group of people?

Can a name of a person (usually from stories, or history) be used to describe a group of people? For example, can Cinderella be used to refer to girls who are poor and have difficulties in life, but ...
0
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1answer
41 views

What does the phrase by Sloterdijk mean? [closed]

"A session of a carnival club" - what's that? What kind of club is it? Any synonyms? Descroptions? Examples? Anything?
12
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5answers
3k views

Is “drownded” a word?

Is there such a word as "drownded"? I would say "drowned" but I am hearing "drownded" so often I am beginning to wonder. For example: He went into the deepest waters and drownded.
3
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4answers
89 views

Fitting word for “subject to physics” or possibly “subject to laws”

Is there a fitting word that means "subject to physics" or possibly "subject to laws"? It seems to me that I must have read such a word somewhere but I simply can't dredge one up. Ex: Any passengers ...
1
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4answers
80 views

“corollarily” or equivalent?

A corollary in mathematics is a useful side-effect (with other related meanings, but as it pertains to this question, that's the relevant definition to keep in mind). I want to use the word ...
5
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3answers
307 views

Why are foreign words used in modern vernacular?

Why are seemingly foreign words such as hors d’œuvres, maître d’, garçon, and Gesundheit used in American vernacular?
15
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7answers
2k views

Is there a word to name being unable to think of “proper terminology” for something?

In regards to only being able to say something like "hand ankle" when meaning "wrist", but the person is absolutely unable to remember the word "wrist". (Or "unsweet doughnut", when someone can't ...
14
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16answers
3k views

A word that means 'most important'?

I tried to find a single word that means "most important", but I couldn't. I want it to be able to express what's missing below: If you get hurt, the _ thing to do is to stay calm. It would ...
16
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21answers
8k views

What is the word for the emotion I feel when I see someone being humiliated?

When I see someone else being embarrassed / humiliated, for example a singer forgetting their words in a concert, I would say something like "I feel embarrassed for them". But is there a better word ...
1
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3answers
83 views

“To tame” for “to cultivate [vegetables, a land, etc.]” and “to domesticate (or farm) [poultry, fish, etc.]” in AmE

The Harrap's New Shorter French and English dictionary Ed. 1985, defines both verbal and adjectival "tame" as Americanisms for respectively "to cultivate" and "cultivated", as of a plant or a land ...
0
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2answers
39 views

What category includes “news”, “articles”, and “stories”

I have created a dropdown menu for my website. In this dropdown menu I have put a tab for audio, a tab for video, but I don't know what to call the category that include (News, articles, and stories ...
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0answers
16 views

Which is correct: I chose not to discuss my concerns, or I chose to not discuss my concerns? [duplicate]

Which is correct: I chose not to discuss my concerns, or I chose to not discuss my concerns? chose not to or chose to not
2
votes
1answer
29 views

“A feeling of content” or “A feeling of contentment”?

I'm a native English user. I am used to using "content" as a noun, adjective and verb but when I use it as a noun, I usually use content rather than contentment. I checked the dictionaries and both ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

Desk name plate for a PhD holder

I have read the full article in wikipedia and this question, but I am still unclear about this, as I am not a native speaker. A quick Google search did not help either. My brother recently received a ...
0
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2answers
61 views

Can we use “likewise” instead of “also” in formal writing?

When we write academic paper, can we use "also"? If it is a bit informal, is it ok to use "likewise" instead of "also"? Or, are there any possible expression in such situation?
0
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1answer
710 views

Difference in naming between consulting and consultants

I have a domain research for a company and since English is not my first language I was wondering about the difference between e.g. Boston Consulting and Boston Consultants My guess is that the ...
0
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2answers
61 views

How to emphasize “I would rather”

I would like to emphasize the expression "I would rather... than ...". My native language is French, and in French we would say something like "I would rather 1000 times.... than", so I'm looking for ...
1
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2answers
48 views

Common terminology for “blessing” and “curse”?

I'm doing a certain something that requires identifying a property of some certain (fictional) thing as either "Blessed", "Cursed", or "Neither". What's the common term for "Blessing" or "Cursed", if ...
5
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9answers
182 views

An active verb “to find peace in” something

I'm looking for an active verb which means something along the lines of "to take or find peace in" something. Something like soothe is the opposite of what I want, in the sense that the something is ...
1
vote
3answers
87 views

Another way of saying “easily deceived”?

What's another way of saying easily deceived? I want to have a better vocabulary. Easily deceived sounds a bit basic to me. Is there a better word for that phrase?
1
vote
2answers
63 views

What is/is there a word for singing through your nose?

I recall there being a word for nasal singing, I might be imagining things, but haven't had any luck finding that word on Google. Does any one have any suggestions?
10
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4answers
919 views

What would be a word for describing a tendency to take the literal meaning of words above the accepted meaning?

For example someone accused of homophobia would answer that isn't correct as he is not afraid of homosexuals. The accepted meaning of homophobia is, of course, a much wider range of negative ...
5
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2answers
474 views

Capo = Cheerleader?

I noticed that the demi-official USA national (soccer) team supporter's group has a name for the folks who lead their section of the stands in chants/cheers; a word I'd never seen used for that ...
4
votes
7answers
3k views

What is the opposite of “interesting” in “This person is interesting”?

During a conversation yesterday, I couldn't come up with the opposite of interesting. "Initially she was very interesting, and I enjoyed her company. However, a few months later, she became ...
3
votes
7answers
372 views

What's an adjective that means “has high expectations”

If you were to describe a person as someone who has high expectations or standards (of their work, peers, or subordinates), what word would you use? "Demanding" is the closest I have come but that's ...
0
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4answers
57 views

“Waiting on” and “waiting for” [duplicate]

While purchasing in Walmart, after sliding my card the card machine was saying "Waiting on cashier". What does "waiting on" mean in this case and how it differs from "waiting for"? Would that be ...
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4answers
135 views

Adjectival “Anglican” for “English”, and “Anglicanism” for “Anglomania” in AmE

Harrap's New Shorter French and English Dictionary, Ed. 1985 [Harrap's Shorter French Dictionary], points up adjectival "Anglican" as an Americanism for "English", and "Anglicanism" as an AmE ...
1
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1answer
41 views

A word for “taking some foods from pot and putting it in to the plate”

What word you should use to tell someone to "take some foods from the pot and put it into the plate"? You can say stuff like "take some food" but it does not exactly mean the act of "taking food ...
243
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6answers
73k views

Did English ever have a formal version of “you”?

From the top of my head, Danish "De" (practically never used), German "Sie", Chinese "您", French "vous", Spanish "usted" are a formal way of addressing someone, especially if one isn't familiar with ...
0
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6answers
99 views

A word for someone who occupies a position

Is there a lexicalization for someone who holds a position, for example, in a company, in the army, in an organization, etc? All of the relevant __ should be promptly contacted and updated. ...
3
votes
2answers
259 views

What word or phrase expresses briefly detaining a suspect on the street and then letting him/her go?

Today, a Dutch paper published a little research triggered by a politician outing the English phrase (abbreviated) "65 percent of them have been detained by the police at least once." I think, and ...
12
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2answers
3k views

“Oestrogen” and “oesophagus” — why are they spelled differently in British English?

Within Biology, there are some biological terms that differ in spelling between the British English and American English dictionaries. For example, oestrogen and oesophagus, as well as the word ...
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0answers
38 views

If not only to… - meaning

"He had to make war, he had to make conquests, if not only to subsist". Does if not only to equal so that he could?
0
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2answers
45 views

Meaning of “Gambler at heart” [closed]

I want to know what does the expression gambler at heart mean and in which context we can use it?
12
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3answers
280 views

What is a “canary-trainer”?

In Arthur Conan Doyle's The adventure of Black Peter, Watson casually refers to a previous exploit of Holmes:- In the memorable year '95 a curious and incongruous succession of cases had engaged ...
0
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1answer
46 views

Is the term “local unit shipping fee” correct?

We have "unit price" is the price of 1 item only. And this price does not include shipping fee. I am using the term "local unit shipping fee" to express that is the shipping fee of 1 item only and ...
0
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1answer
28 views

“To take in” and “to catch” in the sense "to attend and visit (or see) [the sights of (a city, etc.)] in AmE

Do these terms share the same degree of informality in the sense "to attend and visit (or see)" as of someone taking in/catching the sights of a place, or taking in/catching a show or a movie? E.g. ...
3
votes
1answer
77 views

“Sport”, “sports”, and “sporting” as modifiers

Is there a difference between a "sports jacket", a "sport jacket", and a "sporting jacket"? Or are these merely dialectal differences? For instance, why do various outerwear and sportswear brands ...
4
votes
3answers
118 views

Yards, courtyards, and gardens in AE

As long as reportedly Americans commonly designate an area of land, usually planted with plants, trees, flowerbeds, etc., adjoining a house as a yard (front yard/backyard); and a plot of land used for ...
3
votes
4answers
304 views

“Shag” for “chase and bring back, fetch” in AE

Does "shag" have any currency in modern day AE to mean "chase and bring back, fetch (an escaped animal/prisoner)"? Is its use limited to the pursuit of runaways, or can it be extended to a broader ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

“To charge (that…)” for “to claim/to assert” in AmE

While browsing my bilingual dictionary, Ed. 1985, I stumbled upon the verb "to charge" in a meaning defined as an Americanism [3(b) U.S.: to charge that... alléguer que...(to assert that)] without any ...
1
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2answers
33 views

“Knob” vs. “knoll” in AmE

The Harrap's New Shorter French and English Dictionary Ed. 1985, defines one of the senses of "knob" as an AmE equivalent for "knoll", i.e. a small, rounded hill or eminence; hillock. Sadly enough, ...
0
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7answers
106 views

What do you call someone who's involved in a project (non-leading role)

We currently have two roles for our project, namely: project manager `someone who is involved', ie. regular worker/employee but I'm not really satisfied with worker. What do you usually call ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Idiomatic AmE term for “B&B”/“bed & breakfast”/“chambre d'hôte” and “table d'hôte”

Is there an idiomatic term or expression in modern day AmE for what in the UK is designated by the shared "B&B"/"bed & breakfast", and seemingly by the originally FrF expression "chambre ...
0
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2answers
60 views

“Associate with [someone]” for “socialize with [someone]” in colloquial AE

What's the difference in AE between saying "I like to associate with new folks" and "I like to socialize with new folks"? E.g. I am a positive person and I like to associate with other positive ...