A vocabulary is the body of words used in a particular language.

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3
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3answers
90 views

What does “consound” mean?

Hello and happy holidays. While reading The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, I came across the expression "consound it" in Huck's dialogue parts. "Consound it, Tom Sawyer, you're just old pie, 'longside ...
1
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1answer
15 views

Word for a statement that embodies its own 'theme'?

eg, "People over-generalize." Sort of, 'autological', for sentences.
2
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1answer
46 views

English Expressions that mean 'almost always' [closed]

I'm looking for an adequate expression for 'almost always': The sentence I want to use is like "It almost always happens." I think 'very often' is a bit weaker than I want. Any good expression for ...
30
votes
3answers
1k views

Terms for collections of animals

As I watched the murder of crows sitting on the line above my house this evening, I got wondering where all of the collective nouns for animals (pod of whales, gaggle of geese, pride of lions) came ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

What is the difference between “submit” and “deposit”? [on hold]

I am trying to find out the difference between "submit" and "deposit" these words are very confusing when you visit to a bank and somebody ask you "what is the purpose of you to come here and you ...
2
votes
3answers
340 views

Is majoritively a word?

So I was writing a sentence and the word majoritively popped into my head as a "Hey, why not? Sounds good!" type of word. My sentence was to the effect of: Our GridViews majoritively use classic ...
-3
votes
1answer
54 views

How do we know if learning some of the new words are necessary or a waste of energy? [on hold]

Sometimes I receive emails with the name " word of the day" ,but I don’t know how understandable this words are for the others, if I search it on Google Ngram tool I still don’t know this site ...
1
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4answers
79 views

Understandable songs to learn English [on hold]

I am not very good at speaking and listening English. Can someone please suggest some songs, which have clear pronunciation of English words, to listen and understand the songs too and also I can use ...
2
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3answers
7k views

What does the term “crack-a-lacking” mean?

In the Gorillaz song Welcome to the World of the Plastic Beach rapper Snoop Dogg uses the term crack-a-lacking. I've done some searching and can't find a reliable source for the origin and exact ...
3
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1answer
52 views

Is “scathingly small” used correctly?

I heard a quote today on the radio from Dr. Michael Fine, Rhode Island's director of the Department of Health, where he used the phrase "scathingly small" (e.g. here) when referring to Ebola's chances ...
1
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3answers
54 views

Is there a literary or scholarly synonym for an 'origin story' or myth?

I am trying to remember a word I learned in high school that meant "a story that explains why something is the way it is." It's not origin story or creation myth, but rather one word probably with a ...
2
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2answers
552 views

“I'll revenge” vs “I'll take revenge”

Throughout my life I have thought that the correct expression is to take revenge; however, I have also heard people saying I'll revenge. Which is correct?
2
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5answers
51 views

What's the best word that can be used to describe level of activeness?

I'm looking for a word that can be used in a question like "how is his * right now?", where a possible answer is 'calm'. Another example is: Person 1: Calm down! Person 2: My * is none of your ...
2
votes
2answers
401 views

What's the word for “ninja'd” in publishing things

I am looking for the word for a situation like this: Someone is planning to make a big instruction video for how to fold fitted sheets, but just before he's finished his big project, someone else ...
-1
votes
2answers
121 views

Addressing women with “Sir” [duplicate]

In movies, mostly around military personnel, female officers are sometimes addressed as "Sir" (Sometimes also followed by a "Um, ma'am, sorry..."). What would be the correct usage here if not using ...
2
votes
8answers
67 views

A word for not knowing an appropriate word [duplicate]

What is a word to represent a situation in which we feel short of word to be able to express what we want to or what we are feeling .
33
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18answers
5k views

Completing something just to finish it despite lack of interest - is called …?

Recently I started reading a novel that I was excited to read. After getting approximately 45% into it, I lost the pace. It started becoming slow and lousy. I thought to leave it unfinished but it ...
1
vote
4answers
8k views

What does *countenance* mean, and why do I have hard time remembering it? [closed]

I keep seeing this word every couple of months in NYT or Wall Street Journal (and once again, I stumbled upon the word in the article America's True History of Religious Tolerance). Every time I see ...
2
votes
4answers
121 views

Fear of asking girl out - is called …?

Fear or phobia of asking girl out, fear of rejection(that she would say no or even worse). Here, Soceraphobia (fear of her father/brother) is not involved. Mostly guys are feared by most compelling ...
6
votes
8answers
2k views

What's a word for an instance in which one has an opinion about something without having tried it?

What do you call it when someone has a strong opinion about something without having any experience with that thing? For example, if someone writes an entire newspaper article about how disgusting pie ...
8
votes
6answers
4k views

A word for “rate of change”

Physics problems are usually written like: The rate of change of the soup's temperature ... Is there a common English word that captures "rate of change" or "speed of change" in a single word, ...
19
votes
4answers
5k views

Is “prepone” being used outside India?

Prepone is a great word - it's the opposite of postpone. When you prepone a meeting, you change its scheduled time so that it occurs sooner than originally planned. Has his usage spread beyond India? ...
3
votes
5answers
26 views

Better way of saying “in order to demonstrate this”

What is a better way of saying "in order to demonstrate this, I will..."? I already use "to that effect" in the same paragraph. I'm looking for something as compact and concise as "to that effect" ...
3
votes
4answers
66 views

on Sundays and every Sunday

I am curious whether 'on Sundays' and 'every Sunday' are interchangeable. Can you think of any examples that prove they are not? What about "He usually goes to church on Sundays' and 'he usually goes ...
1
vote
2answers
155 views

Need a proper English expression to reflect a concept [closed]

I am working on translating software and its documentation to English. This software basically organizes and stores technical documents. A document may consist of a set of various files, stored on a ...
0
votes
2answers
155 views

Would you possibly elaborate your explanations? [closed]

Mary doesn’t play the piano well and nor does Alex. Mary doesn’t play the piano well. Nor does Alex. Are they the same? and which one do you use? ......................................... Now, ...
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1answer
55 views

what does “field release” mean in this sentence?

"Technical workshop on preparation of dossiers for field release of LMOs" LMO= Living Modified Organism
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2answers
156 views

Is there words that mean “meet the criteria”?

I'm making a comic strip and looking for a funny word in the theme of hair, maybe something that means "make it meet the criteria". It is hard for me to explain, as my first language isn't English. ...
21
votes
22answers
11k views

Is there a single word for “one who speaks/boasts a lot about everything”?

I'm looking for a single word to most aptly describe a person possessing the following "qualities": Appears to be superior in every technology/skill under the sun, which he deems worthy of knowing ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

Administer the patient the drug? Administer the patient with the drug?

Does the verb “administer”, as in to give a drug, work like the verb “give” or like the verb “provide”? Which of the following is better: 1 or 2? Patients are administered the drug. Like ...
3
votes
4answers
143 views

American word for commode

I know several words for the toilet, i.e. bathroom. However I want to know the colloquial word for the seat on which one sits while defecating. I have read john somewhere but never heard an American ...
6
votes
2answers
272 views

How much of the English language comes from each of its influences?

I was watching a video linked in this answer and it made the following claim: [...] like most words in English is derived from German. That got me thinking. While I know that Germanic languages ...
1
vote
2answers
42 views

differentiating between all that and what

Original-- extracted from the book Scarlet Letter: Like all that pertains to crime, it seemed never to have known a youthful era. My own rephrased sentences: Like whatever that pertains to crime, ...
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0answers
37 views

What does “courses for horses” mean? [closed]

Wiktionary states that "courses for horses" is the chiasmus for "horses for courses". But what does "courses for horses" mean exactly? What are some example usages of this idiom?
4
votes
4answers
76 views

Is it correct to say “In order to overcome this loss”?

I am looking for a word that I can use in a situation where I would like to say: In order to "overcome" the loss, we have to ... . I know somehow that the word "overcome" is not correct to use ...
-1
votes
1answer
29 views

What is the difference between “way of thinking” vs “the way they think”

I am writing a short description of a social experiement. The objective is to get a better idea of the way people think. I have some troubles to understand the difference between those two phrases: ...
2
votes
2answers
92 views

Thanks. You got it

Can "You got it, dude " be used as a reply to "thank you" in informal English?
1
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0answers
67 views

Is “I am not about this week” correct

We had an English test today and the correct answer to one question was "I am not about this week. I work in Romania" Is this correct and if yes what does it mean?
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2answers
46 views

Is there any expression like “minor fun”?

"Minor fun" or "trivial fun", which I think means that tiny, little, minor, trivial things or actions that is funny or interesting.
14
votes
5answers
7k views

Is it correct to say “He got a fatal injury in the accident” when there is a possibility that the person’s life will be saved?

I would like to know whether “fatal injury” means (1) an injury which causes a death, (2) an injury which almost causes a death but not necessarily does, or (3) both (1) and (2) depending on the ...
6
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2answers
18k views
7
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3answers
1k views

Name(s) for the top and bottom of an apple

Not sure if this is a right place to ask this question, but I'll have a go. What do you call the ends of an apple, as in, the branch side, and its opposite side where it's caved in?
0
votes
2answers
33 views

Truancy or Skip class

At my school, I realized that most of my teachers use the phrase "skip class/school" while only a few of them use the word "truancy/truant". So, my question is what is the difference between these ...
3
votes
2answers
139 views

Torturing oneself by emotions is called?

People who love emotions, they love to torture themselves by emotional feelings. Be it real or vicarious. Often see people reading love stories and getting emotional, listening to sad song and watch ...
11
votes
5answers
2k views

The Equivalent Term for Pharmacy in the UK

In the States, we use the term "pharmacy" or "drugstore," but what is the equivalent in the UK? I checked two sources, but came up with nothing.
3
votes
1answer
2k views

What is “soft skill”?

Please elaborate what does it mean by soft skill in term of English language.
1
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0answers
47 views

Looking for an Equivalent to the AWL for Academic Idioms

Coxhead developed and evaluated something called the "Academic Word List" for English Language Learners. This is a list of (supposedly) the most common "academic" terms to be used by students from ...
1
vote
1answer
89 views

Fastest way to learn new difficult words to widen vocabulary? [closed]

I am training for the GRE. I am wondering what the fastest way to learn difficult words is. Recently, I have been using a method that puts a lot of words under an umbrella. For example: Umbrella term: ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Word for belief or prejudice that is held, but it is not conscious

I remember reading about an idea of a belief or prejudice that is subconscious. It had a prefix, and it was something like: belief -> alief or prejudice -> ajudice But I can't remember the ...
0
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1answer
61 views

Word to Describe One Who Speaks Politely but with Conviction [closed]

Imagine you are at a debate on a controversial topic. One of the speakers presents her case straightforwardly and with conviction; there is no doubting her stance on the issue. At the same time, you ...