A vocabulary is the body of words used in a particular language.

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Torturing oneself by emotions is called?

People who love emotions, they love to torture themselves by emotional feelings. Be it real or vicarious. Often see people reading love stories and getting emotional, listening to sad song and watch ...
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0answers
136 views

Looking for an Equivalent to the AWL for Academic Idioms

Coxhead developed and evaluated something called the "Academic Word List" for English Language Learners. This is a list of (supposedly) the most common "academic" terms to be used by students from ...
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1answer
59 views

Word for belief or prejudice that is held, but it is not conscious

I remember reading about an idea of a belief or prejudice that is subconscious. It had a prefix, and it was something like: belief -> alief or prejudice -> ajudice But I can't remember the ...
0
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1answer
92 views

Word to Describe One Who Speaks Politely but with Conviction [closed]

Imagine you are at a debate on a controversial topic. One of the speakers presents her case straightforwardly and with conviction; there is no doubting her stance on the issue. At the same time, you ...
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1answer
227 views

Fastest way to learn new difficult words to widen vocabulary? [closed]

I am training for the GRE. I am wondering what the fastest way to learn difficult words is. Recently, I have been using a method that puts a lot of words under an umbrella. For example: Umbrella term: ...
0
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2answers
45 views

Collective word for these people

I am looking for a word to describe people such as barber, ironsmith, tailor, carpenter etc. People with miscellaneous specialty who would move to a village to serve others who are normally into ...
0
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2answers
132 views

use of the word “assume” in this sentence

Apologies for the bad question title, I lack sufficient vocabulary. From the vocabulary I know I could not find a duplicate question. I am having trouble understanding how the word "assume" can be ...
11
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5answers
2k views

The Equivalent Term for Pharmacy in the UK

In the States, we use the term "pharmacy" or "drugstore," but what is the equivalent in the UK? I checked two sources, but came up with nothing.
2
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5answers
253 views

What is the emotion for being glad of someone getting their just deserts

Is there a word for the feeling of satisfaction when someone 'bad' gets punished? For example, when watching a movie and seeing the villain finally get defeated, the audience feels a sense of... what? ...
4
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3answers
553 views

Word for “taking advantage of non-public resource”?

One is always sleepy at the afternoon, especially after a full lunch. I just had a good doze in a lovely sofa after some reading in a hotel nearby, used the toilet , enjoyed the music, and read the ...
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1answer
72 views

Using Verbpathy as a Tool to Connect with English [closed]

Does anyone use the tool of "verbpathy" in their own English studies? This is a device that lets the language learner connect with the positive, negative, or neutral aspect of a word, phrase or ...
4
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2answers
100 views

Why is myrmidon pejorative

Myrmidons were a people in ancient Greece commanded by Achilles, the son of their king, in the Iliad. In modern English, a "myrmidon" is a henchman; a subordinate tough; - I think the word is ...
0
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1answer
44 views

What is the right way to say that, “his credit balance is likely to be in deficit” [closed]

I want to say that that 'x' person spends a lot and his credit balance is likely to become negative. "With multiple ...., his balance is likely to be in deficit." OR "With multiple ...., his ...
0
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1answer
261 views

Where and how do I use the word “apparently”?

Does this word "apparently" mean that something is obvious or does it refer to something that seems true but actually isn't. Apparent means illusion, right? People use this word quite often and I ...
5
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6answers
1k views

Word for inane words used for emphasis

"The most very best you will ever in the universe" There's a word for the category of words such as the above, words that are used to emphasise something without adding any content by themselves. ...
3
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3answers
375 views

Water caltrop in American English

There's a moderately popular fruit found in India known as panifal or singada in Hindi. The fruit comes from an aquatic plant that grows in stagnant or slow-moving water up to 10-15 foot deep. Here's ...
2
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1answer
130 views

English Expressions that mean 'almost always' [closed]

I'm looking for an adequate expression for 'almost always': The sentence I want to use is like "It almost always happens." I think 'very often' is a bit weaker than I want. Any good expression for ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

“waiter” vs “server”

Are they really the same in every respect? What are the differences if any? In India, they're always called waiter regardless of the size and exclusivity of the establishment. Is it the same in the ...
2
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1answer
110 views

Origin of Spread Oneself Too Thin

Three questions: What is the origin of the English idiom, "spread oneself too thin?" Is this used as frequently in the U.K. as it is in the U.S.? What about Australia and New Zealand: Is it as ...
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2answers
185 views

How far (technically) is a “stone's throw?”

A "stone's throw" means a short distance. Questions: (1) How far--technically-- is a stone's throw in terms of its usage? (i.e., Can you use it for a few feet as well as a mile away?) (2) Is it ...
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3answers
104 views

Is there a word similar to infallible that means “incapable of being right”?

The word infallible can mean "incapable of being wrong". The word fallible can mean "capable of being wrong". Is there a word that means "incapable of being right"?
2
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1answer
665 views

What does “curfew” mean in the context of a concert?

I am going to buy a ticket for a concert, and the show description says: Door time: 7pm Curfew: 10pm I was thinking that curfew means the latest time you can access the venue, is this correct? ...
1
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1answer
53 views

Time and “look back on” as a phrasal verb

When using this tri-part phrasal verb, i.e., "look back on," what is the length of time it refers to or can refer to? For example, it's common to say: "When John looks back on his childhood, he can ...
2
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2answers
113 views

American words for gas stoves

Please take a look at the following two images: In India, it's customary to refer to the thing in the first image as a "gas stove" and the second as a"cooking range" or "hob." Is it the same in ...
2
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1answer
61 views

Meaning of “tea party”

Of late I've noticed that this phrase seems to be tossed around all the time especially in the context of political discussions. What does it exactly mean? For example, take a look at the following ...
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5answers
3k views

What are these vehicles called in the United States?

I understand the names for various types of cars in the US as well as elsewhere, such as hatchback, sedan, SUV, etc. However there are two classes of vehicles that don't seem to fall under any of ...
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4answers
303 views

One word for “The amount paid to a person A because of the damage caused to him by person B”

I know there's a word for this but can't remember it. Can someone please help me figure this out. It also means, amount paid to a king after winning a war by the defeated king. Thank you :)
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11answers
5k views

Equivalent of “Excuse me” for “you're not in my way”? Pedestrian bump avoidance

Is there a quick phrase, like "excuse me", that means "You're not in my way; please don't change this fact"? I mean in the context of e.g. passing someone who's on the grass between the sidewalk and ...
15
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4answers
2k views

The word for a man who hunts a dangerous mountain cat without prophylactic? [closed]

Hello once again special team stack exchange and a usage. I search many hours dictionary for a man goes into woods for hunt dangerous mountain cat or similar enemy despite no protection or ...
2
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3answers
134 views

Adrenaline vs epinephrine

I just stumbled upon a blog that states that epinephrine is the American name for adrenaline. Is it true? If so, how prevalent is this Americanism within America? And do they prefer epinephrine in ...
1
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1answer
60 views

What is the meaning behind “wag imagined”?

Today I read these sentences in The Economist "Lying, cheating bankers" “IF YOU can only be good at one thing, be good at lying…because if you’re good at lying, you’re good at everything.” ...
4
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4answers
221 views

American word for commode

I know several words for the toilet, i.e. bathroom. However I want to know the colloquial word for the seat on which one sits while defecating. I have read john somewhere but never heard an American ...
5
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2answers
132 views

Words without simple synonyms

Is there a word or concept that describes words lacking simple (e.g. less pretentious, less technical, less subjugating) synonyms, or more generally words without single-word synonyms. I'm looking for ...
1
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1answer
80 views

A turned on or off car?

Will these expressions sound natural (to native English speakers)? Any better way to say: 1 - A turned on car 2 - A turned off car 3 - An idling car 4 - An idled car 5 - The car is turned off 6 ...
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2answers
76 views

Words having two converse meanings [duplicate]

Many words have several meanings and some even have two converse meanings. Two examples of such words are amateur and literally as illustrated by the following: She is an art amateur. This is ...
2
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1answer
78 views

What do (or what can) artists do? [closed]

I am attempting to give a title to something I am writing but having a bit of difficulty finding a fitting verb to proceed the word 'art.' I am centering what I'm writing around this quote: "God's ...
0
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3answers
74 views

I'm looking for a word like “routing out” that also describes a “blind gamble”

When my old dog and I had a regular local park, upon entering, she used to immediately run through all the bushes, hoping to flush out any squirrels. She didn't know if there were any squirrels ...
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2answers
61 views

What is generic name for devices like this?

Well, problem is programming-related, but main problem is a naming, so I guess it's a correct place to ask. I have various type of devices designed to affect environment conditions. Typical examples ...
2
votes
2answers
65 views

hierarchical representations of verb meanings

Nouns can quite easily be represented in semantic hierarchies... ...with "hyponyms" serving as specific instances of "hypernyms." Q: Does anyone know of similar representations of verbs? Some ...
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5answers
1k views

word or phrase for a smell that sparks nebulous memories of times or places past

I sometimes catch a whiff of something that reminds me very strongly, but very vaguely, of a time in my past. Different whiffs for different times. It's not a single identifiable smell and a single ...
0
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2answers
59 views

Genre restrictions [closed]

How to say correctly: 'law of the genre', 'rules of the genre' or 'genre principles'? For example: — In your fashion magazine no suffering at all. There are no hungry children, old age people... ...
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2answers
125 views

How to use the word “piquant”?

I referred the meaning for the word piquant and the dictionary online gives two contexts in which it can be used 1) taste : piquant taste 2) attractive and charming : piquant face But I am seeing ...
0
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2answers
51 views

“One word for ”Has the same features“”

Is there a single word to state two versions of a software have the same feature? I would like to say "Version X+1 is comparable-in-terms-of-features to version X" I cought "isofunctional" online ...
1
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2answers
240 views

What's a modern equivalent of “fie on thee”?

Is there a modern equivalent to the archaic expression "fie on thee"? I'm aware of expressions such as "damn you" and the like, but I'm looking for something less strong.
0
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3answers
62 views

Keep shares/stocks for a short time and sell them

I am looking for some vocabulary that describes the practice of buying and keeping stocks/shares for a short time and selling them to gain quick proft. It could be a compound noun. I am not sure.
1
vote
1answer
143 views

Persister or Persistor

Computer science uses the term "persistence" to describe, basically, data that sticks around after the device is turned off. The corresponding verb is "to persist". What I'm looking for is a noun to ...
5
votes
2answers
389 views

Exponent vs. Proponent

"Exponent" and "proponent" seem to have (at least) overlapping definitions in the sense of "one who advocates". What distinguishes them?
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0answers
42 views

“Leave” doing sth meaning stop / give up

Is it correct to say "leave a course" (stop doing it, give it up)? e.g. I took an English course but after some time I left if .
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5answers
4k views

Is there a word for a professional who has a beautiful and neat handwriting and whose work consists of using that attribute?

These days, when we use the computer for everything, it may be very difficult to find professionals who have beautiful and neat handwriting and whose work consists of using that skill. A century ago, ...
0
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1answer
47 views

Which word is best; “population”, “pick” or “combination”?

Please look at the sentence below. The ________ of actors and actresses is very important in this movie I will make. Which of the following three words fit best in the blank space? ...