A vocabulary is the body of words used in a particular language.

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What is the meaning of the terms: brown meat, black meat, white meat and red meat?

While reading an article, I saw this question: Do you prefer brown meat or white meat? I definitely don't know what this means. Could you tell me more about it?
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1answer
709 views

What does “if you were already set for life” mean?

From this blog post, the author writes: What’s your passion? What would you blog about if you were already set for life? I don't quite understand — what meaning is the author trying to ...
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2answers
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the usage of “otherwise” [closed]

In this article, I don't quite understand the following sentence: Instead of bothering to sort out that little difficulty, let's see why it is in fact enough to let B be the set of all bilinear ...
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1answer
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Extra pages for a magazine

In some special days, e.g. the days before the New Year, newspapers and magazines give away some extra pages or even an special magazine associated with those days, or related to the year passed. What ...
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5answers
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What is between dystopian and utopian?

There are many speculative fiction pieces that are labeled "dystopian" and some "utopian". Is there a specific word for the reasoned middle ground? Please let me know if this is better suited to the ...
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1answer
898 views

Word usage of 'query'

Is there anything wrong in the following sentence : I queried Sonia about her Personal Computer. The sentence is akin to : I asked Sonia about her Personal Computer. Am I right ?
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Simple word related to “a group of intellectuals” or “a group of smart learners”

What could be a good word for "a group of intellectuals" or "a group of smart learners"? Any suggestions of related terms also invited.
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1answer
751 views

How have British English U and non-U speech changed between the 1950s and now?

How have British English U and non-U speech changed between the 1950s and the present day?
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6answers
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Attorney at law, is there any other kind?

I have wondered from time to time about the phrase "attorney at law." Are there other kinds of attorneys? Attorneys at arms? If not, why do we specify?
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4answers
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Are emails, videos, and audios, etc, considered telegrams?

What does the word "telegram" mean? It sounds familiar though I've no idea what it is. The dictionary says "telegram" is defined as: "A message sent by telegraph and then delivered in written or ...
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2answers
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What's a reception room / parlor / parlour / drawing room?

What's a reception room/parlor/parlour/ drawing room? I'm thinking, is it just another word for the living room of my house?
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1answer
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'Conscribed' vs 'conscripted'

I'm wondering about the usage of the words 'conscript' and 'conscribe' in terms of the meaning they share. I went to use the word 'conscripted' as in "conscripted for duty", and the word 'conscribe' ...
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4answers
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Where does “otay” come from?

I've heard a few people (all native English speakers) recently use "otay" in place of "okay", both in writing and when speaking. Where does that word come from? For that matter, is it a word at all? ...
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2answers
873 views

Confusing meanings of “inexorable” and “unstoppable”

I saw these two words, which I had always assumed meant the same thing, in the same sentence (below). It begs a question as to the difference between them: Sentence: This restless and perpetual ...
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7answers
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Do you say 'white blackboard'?

English is not my first language, so I'm not sure what you commonly call one of these: I'm trying to choose between blackboard, white blackboard, or maybe just 'slate'.
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14answers
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Is there a polite alternative to “No thanks, I'm full”?

English is not my native language, but when I was studying in the US, I was always trying to find an alternative to I'm full! I felt that it was a very improper way to express that I have eaten ...
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6answers
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“tag question” vs. “question tag”

I've just read this page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tag_question So regarding this passage: The term "question tag" is generally preferred by British grammarians, while their American ...
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2answers
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Why “just another bit of intrigue”?

The following is an excerpt from the transcript of a podcast:Tut Shares Tomb with Former Fungi. Mitchell thinks this evidence indicates that King Tut was buried in a hurry. Because the paint on ...
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2answers
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“When the internet first got kicking”?

When the internet first got kicking, some scholars of democracy and civil society thought that online discussions could create what they called a "conversational democracy”: an ongoing town hall ...
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4answers
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Term for insulting words which sound grand?

I don't mean euphemisms or backhanded compliments (or the reverse). It's the words which sound grand, but actually have a bad meaning (e.g., jumentous: smelling strongly like a beast of burden). Is ...
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1answer
424 views

Does the word “system” have any special meaning in literature?

I'm writing an English rendition of a Farsi passage. There's a word I'm hunting for which means methods of literary styles of writing. I came across with the word "system" in a "Farsi to English ...
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4answers
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How to understand “pop” in this sentence?

So next time you pop a blueberry, don’t forget to thank Fred. How to understand "pop" in this sentence? Does it mean "eat" or "have"? I look up into the dictionary, I cannot even find a ...
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5answers
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Single word for “break” with professional connotation

What is a nice way to explain that performing a certain action will "break" a product? I have to explain to a customer that use of my product in an unauthorized manner will "break" the product, but ...
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2answers
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Differences between “vulgar” and “coarse”, “crass”, “crude”, “rough”, “rude”, “unrefined” as applied to language

This question specifically covers how these terms are used to describe language, it is a followup to What's the difference between "informal", "colloquial", "slang", ...
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Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon: Is there a name for this kind of punny transference?

First came John Guare's play Six Degrees of Separation, which was later turned into a film. It was about the web of interconnections that binds all of humanity together. Later came the well known ...
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1answer
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“Place” or “venue”?

Do place and venue have the same meaning? If not what are the differences and when do we use which?
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Is “so-so” correct usage for “more or less”?

I took a trip down to Mexico last week and I heard "so-so" in response to "Do you speak English?" Now, I'm used to hearing "so-so" more in the context of "all right" or "OK", but not as in "more or ...
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2answers
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what's the phrase for “I don't want to be reliant on someone else”

I remember that there is a phrase with the word whims that goes about like this: "I don't want to be reliant on someone else" Does anyone know what that phrase is?
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1answer
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“Touring team” vs. “Exhibition team”

When we are not playing competitive games, our three touring teams play against three exhibition teams. What do the bold terms mean?
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2answers
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What does “not having a pair” mean?

From http://blog.peta2.com/2011/05/coming-out-twice.html?c=peta2_enews: I had been trying to keep my vegan tendencies on the DL for years by that point, but it was getting harder and harder ...
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3answers
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What should I call this kind of animation?

On opening this link you will see a car that has a kind of glowing bulb on it. I am talking to my client and we both are not good in English. I have to find this kind of animation from a search ...
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2answers
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Origin of “s--t eating grin”

What is the origin of the phrase shit eating grin? How did it come to mean showing smugness or self-satisfaction of an individual's actions?
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9answers
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What to call certain types of vague words that trigger strong emotions

I guess I can call them 'politician words' but.... What do you call a word/phrase that has a lot of emotion behind it, but doesn't necessarily have any specific meaning. E.G.: Freedom, Liberty, ...
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What do you call a group of people that move a lot?

I can't think of the word to describe it. Something similar to "wanderer" or "roamer". It's often used to describe people that don't stay in one place... not "migratory"...
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What's the word for when a word means what it seems like it should mean?

I'm not talking about onomatopoeia—I don't mean a word that describes a sound—I mean something along the lines of an aptronym, i.e. a perfect name such as Anthony Camera for a photographer (true ...
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2answers
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Meaning of “non-normative”?

What's the meaning of "a non-normative document"? Does "non-normative" mean "casual"? What's the significant difference between a normative document and a non-normative one?
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6answers
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When should I use archaic and obsolete words?

I'm learning the English language, and while reading Merriam-Webster I often see common words with additional "obsolete" and "archaic" descriptions added to their definitions. When should I use ...
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3answers
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What is the collective noun for a collection of collective nouns? [closed]

murder : crows :: _ : collective nouns Sorry, no multiple choice this time.
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Is “pedantician” a word?

Why is someone who is pedantic called a pedant and not a "pedantician"? If a person working in obstetrics is an obstetrician, why is not a person working with words not a pedantician?
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3answers
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Is it appropriate to use 'eagerly' while ending a formal e-mail

Nowadays, I always use the following phrase when I am ending formal email; I eagerly await for your response. Regards, I've seen this phrase somewhere, kind-of a formal e-mail and I am ...
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6answers
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A single word for a person who suffers great loss

Can anybody give me a single word for a person who suffers great loss as in the context below. The word loser is not appropriate: Mike lost everything after his failed business venture. ...
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2answers
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Established as a rule through experimentation or statistics

There's a word that's slipped my mind. It's used for example to qualify findings through tests or statistics as opposed to formulae or hard science. Any ideas?
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9answers
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What is a good adjective for something I do a lot?

I think a lot about various things. While not working, I think about something, and this is what I do during most of my available time. What would be a good adjective to describe that. At first I ...
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5answers
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Is it true that the plural of “chad” is “chadim”?

I was busy at filing tasks today, working the hole punch and manufacturing... er... more than one chad. I consulted the Computer Contradictionary by Stan Kelly-Bootle, which is normally a reliable ...
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5answers
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Does responsibility come with consequences?

When somebody says to me that he “takes full responsibility for” his actions (or inactions), but then requests that I remove the consequences of those actions, it seems to me he does not actually take ...
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3answers
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'Ours' meaning 'our home' - where is it used outside the UK, if anywhere?

In expressions like: Let's go back to ours and have some food. There's a party at ours on Friday. There's a bottle of brandy at yours, isn't there? 'ours' and 'yours' are synonyms for ...
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1answer
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Words: paucity vs scarcity vs dearth

I see these words use interchangeably in various contexts. Is there a formal difference or preference? Please supply relevant examples.
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2answers
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What does “Per [person's name]” mean?

What does "Per John:" mean? From the context of the article I'm reading (article unlinked), it seems to mean "From John:" or "John (said):" What exactly does the word "per" mean when used as such?
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What's the difference between a jumper, a pullover, and a sweater?

Following on from a recent question, in Australia we have the word jumper for a knitted long-sleeved garment, typically woollen and long-sleeved. When cosuming foreign media I always assumed the ...
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2answers
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Meaning of “throw some work your way”

I think probably the expression means to find job for someone, Is it a common expression or a word made inside the movie? I talked to him. He said he can "throw some work my way".