A vocabulary is the body of words used in a particular language.

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How did southern US blacks address whites post-emancipation and pre-civil rights?

You hear it in movies like "The Help" all the time, but I'm trying to look for words like "missuh" and not finding any. Anyone familiar with the early 20th century African American lingo? I'm only ...
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0answers
754 views

Whats' wrong with the following sentence? [closed]

One thing that despise me is when people cannot look me in eye. I believe that the statement is grammatically wrong since we are using passive voice in the sentence so it should be 'despises' ...
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3answers
18k views

If trinity means 3 in one, what's the word for one in one, 2 in one, 4 in one, 5 in one? [closed]

Just curious. Christians have this trinity doctrine. What if, after extensive research, Pope discovers that we have 5 "monotheistic" Gods rather than 3, for example. What would the doctrine name be?
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1answer
35k views

Is there any difference in meaning between 'efficacy' and 'efficiency'? [closed]

I feel that there is a subtle difference in meaning between 'efficacy' and 'efficiency', but I couldn't find any authoritative sources that could help me confirm or refute this. Is there any ...
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3answers
2k views

A negative person [closed]

What is the best word that I could use to describe a person that seems to attract negative situations? Every time I am around him/her, something bad always seems to happen. Is there a word to describe ...
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1answer
79 views

“You can add more at the end of this list BUT before making a new entry make sure its not already present” [closed]

This is a tip that is being included with an Excel form, which requires the end user to fill some technical information. In the given scenario, the end user would not be very tech-literate, so we want ...
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3answers
1k views

I want to buy something, but don't have enough money on me [closed]

Suppose for example I want to buy something, but don't have enough money on me. If I want to come back later to get it and don't want it to be sold before I come back, what do I say to them? Is there ...
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4answers
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Can you find a noun for the word “diminish”? [closed]

What I meant by "diminish" is the reduction in value of something abstract. For example: The purpose of the principle is to set a standard of morality according to the promotion or __ of ...
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1answer
495 views

Term for bowling alley machines that fix pins [closed]

What do we call the bowling alley machines that fix the pins after the ball rolls and hopefully strikes them out?
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3answers
463 views

What's the difference of these words that means “to indicate by signs”? [closed]

presage bode augur betoken omen portend These are the words I learned today. Are they basically the same, or are they usually used in different contexts? I checked the Google Ngram ...
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3answers
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How to speak mathematics [closed]

I've been asked to give lectures on electromagnetism in English, but I encounter many problems trying to express mathematical formulas since they are written and I do not know how to read them. Are ...
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5answers
2k views

Using “to fix” as synonym of “to correct”

I often encounter the usage of "to fix" verb in the meaning "to correct". Was this a widespread use before the computer age? How would you conduct the other meaning of "to fix", i.e. to make ...
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2answers
243 views

Is there a word for a compilation of charts? [closed]

What word can best describe multiple charts put together? (Graphs, in math context - not projections or business)
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8answers
1k views

A Vocabulary word meaning: “ to completely embody the meaning of a term ” [closed]

Example: ( a really REALLY bad situation ) This situation __ FUBAR Some synonyms I can come up with: embodies exemplifies
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3answers
185 views

What is “outbearded”?

I was reading Scott's Woodstock the other day, and came upon the word outbearded. Searching with Google reveals nothing relevant and I am wondering what it means. The context is that Everard and a ...
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4answers
2k views

Isn’t “Eye-glazing” a popular word? Why isn’t it included in major English dictionaries?

I came across the word eye-glazing in the article of today’s Time magazine (Sept 9) titled ‘Slow Down! Why Some Languages Sound So Fast?’, which I'm sure will interest 'language buffs'. It begins ...
3
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3answers
1k views

Does “split” necessarily mean 50/50?

In the Jerusalem Post headline, Palestinians split on Itamar, the statistics cited in the article say that approximately two-thirds of the Palestinians who were polled opposed the attack (Itamar is ...
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1answer
3k views

Is “plunger” a familiar word for part of a phone?

I was looking for the name of the button on a telephone that you push to hang up. On older phones where the receiver sits horizontally over two buttons, I've seen them called "plungers." Are people ...
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3answers
9k views

In which context is the word “libation” more often used?

I noticed that the word libation has 2 meanings: the pouring of a liquid offering as a religious ritual Intoxicating beverage But which of the meanings applies more often?
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1answer
938 views

Looking for word/expression/idiom that describes “difficult to describe driving directions”

On lives in a part of town which has new roads most cab drivers don't know. In effect, one needs to direct the driver to the part of town, instead of just saying "take me to street X that intersects ...
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7answers
4k views

What is “lemonade” in American English?

Lemonade is a fizzy drink, strongly carbonated. It comes in two varieties, white (which is actually colourless) and red. I have never known anyone to make it at home. Various things I've picked up in ...
7
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2answers
513 views

An expression that adds little information

There is a family of expressions called oxymorons which contain contradicting meanings. What about expressions that add little meaning like "fatally injured"? What are these expressions called?
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2answers
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Is there an adjective meaning “dog like”? [closed]

Feline is an adjective meaning "cat like". Then is there an adjective meaning "dog like"?
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3answers
806 views

“Antecedent” vs. “predecessor”

When do I use the word antecedent and when should I prefer predecessor?
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2answers
1k views

What is Iridescent with an extra “r?”

Below is quoted from vocabulary.com. ... (The word) Iridescent came to be in 1796, when some enthusiastic word maker took the Latin word iris, which means "rainbow," and morphed it into an English ...
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5answers
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Is it correct to say “He got a fatal injury in the accident” when there is a possibility that the person’s life will be saved?

I would like to know whether “fatal injury” means (1) an injury which causes a death, (2) an injury which almost causes a death but not necessarily does, or (3) both (1) and (2) depending on the ...
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4answers
8k views

Name for relation between a man’s two wives?

What is the relation between the two wives of a man called?
7
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2answers
886 views

Is “for true” valid English?

I have an English-language version of my Finnish birth certificate. It is called an "extract from the population system". The last paragraph, showing the name of the issuing autority, the place, date ...
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3answers
3k views

Name of castle part

What do you call these? Please provide a reliable source with your answer.
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5answers
467 views

Rule or white list of words that can be prefixed with “up-” or “down-”

Some words (verbs and nouns) can get up- or down- attached before them to get new meaning. For example, Grade becomes upgrade or downgrade. Vote becomes upvote or downvote. Load becomes upload or ...
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5answers
2k views

Word for something that can be validated

What is a word to describe something that can be validated? From verify we have verifiable. What is the equivalent for valid or validate? Obviously validifiable is not a word, so what is the ...
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2answers
1k views

“Purge” vs. “expunge”

Whats the difference between purge and expunge, if any? For example: All the duplicate pages were expunged from the book. All the duplicate pages were purged from the book. Do these ...
5
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9answers
3k views

An experiment without a hypothesis?

An experiment is normally intended to test a hypothesis. Is there a noun or phrase to describe an experiment with no hypothesis -- i.e. doing something just to 'see what happens'? (A convincing ...
8
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3answers
6k views

Meaning of “one order of magnitude improvement”

There is no single development, in either technology or management technique, which by itself promises even one order of magnitude improvement in productivity, in reliability, in ...
9
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1answer
951 views

What is the word for using one part of speech where another would be more grammatical?

There's a Greek word that means using the wrong part of speech somewhere in a sentence, as in: I don't know the who or the how or the when. Where "who", "how", and "when" are being used for ...
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2answers
4k views

What does it mean to be “worth someone's keep”?

“Do not get any gold or silver or copper to take with you in your belts no bag for the journey or extra shirt or sandals or a staff, for the worker is worth his keep. What does it mean ...
2
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1answer
509 views

What does “fly against” mean?

http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2008/11/stop-me-if-you-think-youve-seen-this-word-before.html: I'm not sure this kind of experiment would fly against today's Google, but it worked in 2004. ...
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3answers
392 views

What is this kind of literature called?

I would like to know what a particular form of publication is called, when a work is a collaborative effort of many writers and possibly more than one editor, published in weekly or monthly parts and ...
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1answer
2k views

Is it true that yeast was once called “Godisgoode”?

In this article discussing beer, it is said that in medieval times yeast (possibly only brewer's yeast) was called godisgoode. Is that the case? (Searching on Google sheds very little light on the ...
3
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4answers
234 views

When a patient goes to the doctor and does not have a health insurance plan, how is this appointment classified?

When a patient goes to the doctor without a health insurance plan, is there a term for this kind of appointment? Just to give a context: Me: I want to schedule an appointment Secretary: What is ...
3
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1answer
101 views

Encompass a wrist or is there an alternative?

Can encompass be used to describe someone "holding" someone's wrist gently, and not actually putting any force/ pressure but just holding or gripping it in a very gentle way?
2
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4answers
1k views

What is “generation X” and “generation Y”?

Why are we called Generation Y? What's Generation X anyway? What about Baby Boomers?
1
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1answer
784 views

Where can I find a relatively inclusive word-list for analysis of prefixes and suffixes? [closed]

To illustrate a simple example, when I encounter the word "claustrophobia", what I already knew is the left part "claustro-" means "small and enclosed", and I want to discover if "-phobia" has a fixed ...
0
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1answer
388 views

What is this phenomenon called, “I had a dream that I was having a dream”?

I don't know if anyone of you have these kind of dreams before; I'm dreaming then suddenly I dream that I wake up from that dream. Then, sometimes (admittedly rarely, though it's rather fun) it could ...
6
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5answers
827 views

Can a person's name be used to represent a group of people?

Can a name of a person (usually from stories, or history) be used to describe a group of people? For example, can Cinderella be used to refer to girls who are poor and have difficulties in life, but ...
2
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3answers
653 views

How should I understand “archaeocyte” in this sentence?

Consider the following sentence: The fossil consists of a complete skull of an archaeocyte, an extinct group of ancestors of modern cetaceans. Does it mean "the fossil consists of a complete ...
5
votes
3answers
10k views

Meaning of “more wood behind fewer arrows”?

What does the phrase "more wood behind fewer arrows" mean? Source: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/btl/google-gets-serious-winds-down-google-labs/52848?tag=nl.e539
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2answers
12k views

Difference between lexicon and dictionary

What is the difference between a lexicon and a dictionary? Is a lexicon just an über-big dictionary?
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3answers
210 views

“Application for Android” versus “application on Android”

Which one is correct/most scientific? I am developing a certain application for Android. I am developing a certain application on Android. I am developing a certain application for the platform ...
4
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5answers
3k views

What is the meaning of the terms: brown meat, black meat, white meat and red meat?

While reading an article, I saw this question: Do you prefer brown meat or white meat? I definitely don't know what this means. Could you tell me more about it?