A vocabulary is the body of words used in a particular language.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

4
votes
2answers
786 views

What are the names for geometric arrangements like 'quincunx'?

A quincunx is a geometric pattern consisting of five points arranged in a cross: This seems like a very specific name derived from the Latin root for five (quin). Are there other geometric ...
0
votes
2answers
158 views

Difference between “testified” and “stated” in a legal context

If you're working in a law firm, do the words "testified" and "stated" have two different meanings? For example, The witness testified that... The witness stated that... And is it acceptable ...
2
votes
2answers
35k views

A word to describe having good command of the English language? [closed]

Is there a word to describe having good command of the English language? The kind of word that could be listed as an attribute?
3
votes
3answers
359 views

Generic time range word

I am looking for a word that can replace idioms like daily or monthly, but has the same meaning, and it's generic. By example, if I want to describe my pocket money, I can say I have a daily amount, ...
0
votes
1answer
201 views

Cromogenism, Chromudgeonism?

In one of the commentary tracks for Hellsing Ultimate OVA, English dub director Tallison Jaffe boasts using a few rare words now and then, so the fans have something to look for in their dictionaries. ...
4
votes
3answers
480 views

How to formally state that parents have not raised their children well

I'm writing an article about the family and how it can change a person's life in the future. I need a word that tells the readers about a family in which the parents have not been good enough to ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“Learn” vs. “study” difference [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there any subtle difference between “to study” and “to learn”? What is the difference between "to learn" and "to study"? Can you study without ...
36
votes
6answers
4k views

Is “the girls are want to gossip” correct?

Is this the correct use and placement of want? The girls in the office are want to gossip. Does anyone have a reference citing this use?
2
votes
6answers
931 views

Simple word/ slang for “Re-share a content”

I need a simple(commonly used/known) word or short slang(2 words max.) which means to re-share a piece of information with your network of friends. Something just like "Share" on social networks. ...
2
votes
3answers
217 views

A word for “modify/delete/change a newspaper article” [closed]

a word for " a person/politician asking to review/modify a newspaper article before it is published"
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Can't understand the meaning of “facile” in these example [closed]

I found the meaning of facile is easy, getting something without effort. http://sentence.yourdictionary.com/facile I have read those sentences. But can't understand it clearly. I'm trying to ...
2
votes
2answers
105 views

Alternative to “accessible”

In the context of a technical manual, engineers use the word "accessible" to indicate that a piece of hardware should have "easy access" for repair, maintenance, and other modifications. What would ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

What is a song played at the end of a movie called?

At the end of some movies, there is a song to be played. Is there any word to call these songs? As an example "My Heart Will Go On" from Celine Dion at the of Titanic.
7
votes
1answer
4k views

Why did 'verboten' come into use when we already have 'forbidden'?

Why did 'verboten' come into use when English already has a perfectly good word, 'forbidden', that means exactly the same thing but is much more widely understood? Is there a subtle difference that I ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

pleat vs crease

What is the difference between words pleat and crease in the meaning of a fold in a piece of cloth?
13
votes
6answers
18k views

“peak” vs “summit”

According to the dictionary: peak — the pointed top of a mountain; a mountain with a pointed top summit — the highest point of something, especially the top of a mountain In the picture of the “...
5
votes
9answers
2k views

Word to describe “concealing” positive emotions, in fear of being perceived as irrational

This will be a bit hard to explain, but I'll give it a shot. I am looking for a good word to describe: A person hiding his intense positive enthusiasm and excitement for something, as to not seem ...
2
votes
1answer
570 views

What is a student discussion place called? [closed]

Is there any English word for a place where students of different colleges discuss about activities (events, reputation) of their colleges/universities?
1
vote
2answers
3k views

What is a better word for “works with” or “supplements”?

Situation: A device does not require other special devices but works with standard equipment (and requires it to function properly). It is more that the device supplements the other devices. I am now ...
3
votes
1answer
774 views

What's the low back support part of a chair called?

What is that hooked part of an office chair called, which is used to support the lower back?
7
votes
11answers
1k views

Noun (or alternative) of thought-provoking?

I'm planning to start a blog. And before every post, I'm planning to add how thought-provoking I think that post is. So I was thinking about something that I can call thought-provoking-ness level. ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

Difference between Guise and Disguise [closed]

What is the difference between Guise and Disguise? They sound like antonym word for each other, but they aren't!
-1
votes
1answer
11k views

What are the names of the two sides of a coin? [closed]

I know one side is called 'flower'. But I don't know the other side's name. And any other common ways of calling them. Are 'head' and 'tail' right?
5
votes
4answers
2k views

“Weekdays” used as an adverb

I found a sentence in Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary: open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The bookstore opens weekdays from 9 p.m. to 6 p.m. . How do we understand the structure of ...
13
votes
5answers
175k views

“At/on (the) weekend(s)”

Which expression is better? Which is right? Why? A. Sorry to disturb you at weekend. B. Sorry to disturb you on weekend. C. Sorry to disturb you at weekends. D. Sorry to ...
4
votes
2answers
344 views

“Paraphrasing” an equation [closed]

Three Laws of Thermodynamics (paraphrased): First Law: You can't get anything without working for it. Second Law: The most you can accomplish by work is to break even. Third Law: You can't break ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

What is the definition and usage of “tids and bits”? [closed]

What is the correct definition and usage of the term "tids and bits"? I tried googling but nothing turns up, not even a definition.
-2
votes
1answer
2k views

The growth of English

English is (to her credit) widely considered a language of .. mixed breeding, seeing as to how she accepts favours from just about anybody and everybody. What I'd like to know is how and by how much ...
4
votes
2answers
470 views

Is there any connection between Polari and Nadsat?

While reading the Wikipedia article on Polari, I was struck by the similarities between Polari words and these used by the Droogies in Clockwork Orange. Does anyone know if there are any links between ...
59
votes
2answers
6k views

What is the first part of a joke called?

How does one refer to the first part of a joke? The follow up is often referred to as a punchline but I'm unsure how to refer to the first part. Is it a 'joke' or does a 'joke' include the punchline?
2
votes
3answers
2k views

What does “insteadly” mean?

I have seen it couple of times in a chat room on the internet. What does "insteadly" mean? Is it a shortcut of "instead of"?
4
votes
1answer
556 views

Would you use the term cucumber-time and why?

During International Law studies I talked to English natives about politics, using a literal translation of the Dutch "komkommertijd", cucumber time, meaning to refer to the news-silent period of high ...
5
votes
4answers
4k views

A sentence for a person who is greatly tired

Occasionally, I meet someone who is working hard. He looks so tired and needs to hear some kind words and I don't know what to say. Some time ago, I asked this question of a native speaker and she ...
3
votes
1answer
123 views

“Death Panels” and “Job creators”: Is there a word for these?

Is there a word or expression that describes phrases like "Freedom fries" or "Death panels"? I'm thinking of phrases that seem intentionally designed to either re-frame a familiar concept or to be ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Word for a Rare Feeling

I hope it's not too rare, but at least 1 other person has confirmed having experienced a similar feeling. Small, ordinary things can trigger it, in ordinary situations. Then I sometimes get the ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

What does “implement to” mean?

On UEFI page we can read: Acknowledging that you understand a license is required to implement to the Specification does not now or in future commit you either to completing an Adopter's Agreement ...
5
votes
3answers
63k views

“features and characteristics”

In English, the phrase "features and characteristics" is often used. However, I, as a non-native English speaker, can't understand the difference between them. Longman Dictionary of Contemporary ...
4
votes
2answers
440 views

Is “starboard” used for land vehicles?

Is it correct to use "starboard side" to refer to the "right-side" of a land vehicle (e.g. cars / trucks / lorries / motorcycles) ? Wiktionary seems to accept specifically ships, boats, and aircrafts,...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

How can someone become fluent and improve their writing skills? [closed]

How can someone become fluent and improve their writing skills? I've been learning English for many years and I still face many problems especially at writing(academic writing and writing in general) ...
1
vote
1answer
7k views

If “latter” comes first, and “former” comes second, what comes third? Or fourth? [closed]

If we had an hour long discussion, and discussed 5 topics: A, B, C, D and E in order, to the extent that we are talking about "E" right now, if "D" is the latter, and "C" is the former, what is "B" to ...
1
vote
4answers
30k views

“stress” vs. “distress”

From Cambridge dictionary, stress - great worry caused by a difficult situation. distress - extreme worry, sadness, pain. I'm not sure if the words 'distress' and 'stress' have the same ...
15
votes
5answers
5k views

How do you form the 'north' and 'south' versions of 'occident' and 'orient'?

How does one correctly form the "north" and "south" forms for which occident and orient are "west" and "east"? I found boreal and austral, but those look like adjectives and I'm after the nouns. ...
0
votes
3answers
4k views

Difference between “chest” and “trunk”

According to several dictionaries, a "trunk" is a large case or box that can be used when travelling or for storage, whereas a "chest" is used only for storage. Is that the only difference between the ...
3
votes
3answers
460 views

What word or phrase expresses briefly detaining a suspect on the street and then letting him/her go?

Today, a Dutch paper published a little research triggered by a politician outing the English phrase (abbreviated) "65 percent of them have been detained by the police at least once." I think, and ...
3
votes
2answers
291 views

Words that result from a gradual distortion of other words

Among others, I've heard the following words and their supposed origins: Beef: Comes from the french word "boeuf". Marmelade: Contraction of "Mary" and "malade" according to some story about a ...
0
votes
2answers
697 views

What is the act of self-referencing?

Ok, so something can be self-referencing. "This sentence contains thirty-eight letters." or "This is not a pipe." But what is "doing that" called? Along the lines of how self-deprecating is ...
1
vote
1answer
100 views

Word for a system that exhales gas

I'm looking for a word to describe a system that filters certain gases from a space and 'exhales' them outside. What verb can be used to describe that action?
2
votes
4answers
13k views

Is it correct to use the word 'etiquettes' for plural?

One of my friends argues with me that the plural for etiquette is etiquettes and for fish it is fishes. I was taught since ever that etiquette is plural as fish does. To support his statement he ...
3
votes
5answers
3k views

What's a gender-neutral way of referring to a nurse?

Good afternoon all, In Japanese there is a word called "看護師" which basically is a gender-neutral way of referring to a nurse. I was wondering, Is there such an equivalent word in English? Is there ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the noun for “implore”?

What is the noun form of the word "implore"? I saw some suggestions online for "imploration", but this seems awkward to me.