A vocabulary is the body of words used in a particular language.

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What is a better word for “works with” or “supplements”?

Situation: A device does not require other special devices but works with standard equipment (and requires it to function properly). It is more that the device supplements the other devices. I am now ...
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1answer
756 views

What's the low back support part of a chair called?

What is that hooked part of an office chair called, which is used to support the lower back?
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Noun (or alternative) of thought-provoking?

I'm planning to start a blog. And before every post, I'm planning to add how thought-provoking I think that post is. So I was thinking about something that I can call thought-provoking-ness level. ...
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3answers
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Difference between Guise and Disguise [closed]

What is the difference between Guise and Disguise? They sound like antonym word for each other, but they aren't!
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1answer
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What are the names of the two sides of a coin? [closed]

I know one side is called 'flower'. But I don't know the other side's name. And any other common ways of calling them. Are 'head' and 'tail' right?
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4answers
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“Weekdays” used as an adverb

I found a sentence in Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary: open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The bookstore opens weekdays from 9 p.m. to 6 p.m. . How do we understand the structure of ...
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5answers
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“At/on (the) weekend(s)”

Which expression is better? Which is right? Why? A. Sorry to disturb you at weekend. B. Sorry to disturb you on weekend. C. Sorry to disturb you at weekends. D. Sorry to ...
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2answers
342 views

“Paraphrasing” an equation [closed]

Three Laws of Thermodynamics (paraphrased): First Law: You can't get anything without working for it. Second Law: The most you can accomplish by work is to break even. Third Law: You can't break ...
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9answers
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One word for “any time after this moment”

I was just wondering if there is some sweet and apt word for the phrase "any time after this moment".
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1answer
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What is the definition and usage of “tids and bits”? [closed]

What is the correct definition and usage of the term "tids and bits"? I tried googling but nothing turns up, not even a definition.
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1answer
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The growth of English

English is (to her credit) widely considered a language of .. mixed breeding, seeing as to how she accepts favours from just about anybody and everybody. What I'd like to know is how and by how much ...
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2answers
466 views

Is there any connection between Polari and Nadsat?

While reading the Wikipedia article on Polari, I was struck by the similarities between Polari words and these used by the Droogies in Clockwork Orange. Does anyone know if there are any links between ...
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What is the first part of a joke called?

How does one refer to the first part of a joke? The follow up is often referred to as a punchline but I'm unsure how to refer to the first part. Is it a 'joke' or does a 'joke' include the punchline?
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3answers
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What does “insteadly” mean?

I have seen it couple of times in a chat room on the internet. What does "insteadly" mean? Is it a shortcut of "instead of"?
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1answer
533 views

Would you use the term cucumber-time and why?

During International Law studies I talked to English natives about politics, using a literal translation of the Dutch "komkommertijd", cucumber time, meaning to refer to the news-silent period of high ...
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3answers
4k views

A sentence for a person who is greatly tired

Occasionally, I meet someone who is working hard. He looks so tired and needs to hear some kind words and I don't know what to say. Some time ago, I asked this question of a native speaker and she ...
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1answer
123 views

“Death Panels” and “Job creators”: Is there a word for these?

Is there a word or expression that describes phrases like "Freedom fries" or "Death panels"? I'm thinking of phrases that seem intentionally designed to either re-frame a familiar concept or to be ...
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3answers
2k views

Word for a Rare Feeling

I hope it's not too rare, but at least 1 other person has confirmed having experienced a similar feeling. Small, ordinary things can trigger it, in ordinary situations. Then I sometimes get the ...
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1answer
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What does “implement to” mean?

On UEFI page we can read: Acknowledging that you understand a license is required to implement to the Specification does not now or in future commit you either to completing an Adopter's Agreement ...
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3answers
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“features and characteristics”

In English, the phrase "features and characteristics" is often used. However, I, as a non-native English speaker, can't understand the difference between them. Longman Dictionary of Contemporary ...
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2answers
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Is “starboard” used for land vehicles?

Is it correct to use "starboard side" to refer to the "right-side" of a land vehicle (e.g. cars / trucks / lorries / motorcycles) ? Wiktionary seems to accept specifically ships, boats, and aircrafts,...
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1answer
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How can someone become fluent and improve their writing skills? [closed]

How can someone become fluent and improve their writing skills? I've been learning English for many years and I still face many problems especially at writing(academic writing and writing in general) ...
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1answer
7k views

If “latter” comes first, and “former” comes second, what comes third? Or fourth? [closed]

If we had an hour long discussion, and discussed 5 topics: A, B, C, D and E in order, to the extent that we are talking about "E" right now, if "D" is the latter, and "C" is the former, what is "B" to ...
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“stress” vs. “distress”

From Cambridge dictionary, stress - great worry caused by a difficult situation. distress - extreme worry, sadness, pain. I'm not sure if the words 'distress' and 'stress' have the same ...
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How do you form the 'north' and 'south' versions of 'occident' and 'orient'?

How does one correctly form the "north" and "south" forms for which occident and orient are "west" and "east"? I found boreal and austral, but those look like adjectives and I'm after the nouns. ...
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3answers
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Difference between “chest” and “trunk”

According to several dictionaries, a "trunk" is a large case or box that can be used when travelling or for storage, whereas a "chest" is used only for storage. Is that the only difference between the ...
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3answers
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What word or phrase expresses briefly detaining a suspect on the street and then letting him/her go?

Today, a Dutch paper published a little research triggered by a politician outing the English phrase (abbreviated) "65 percent of them have been detained by the police at least once." I think, and ...
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2answers
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Words that result from a gradual distortion of other words

Among others, I've heard the following words and their supposed origins: Beef: Comes from the french word "boeuf". Marmelade: Contraction of "Mary" and "malade" according to some story about a ...
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2answers
690 views

What is the act of self-referencing?

Ok, so something can be self-referencing. "This sentence contains thirty-eight letters." or "This is not a pipe." But what is "doing that" called? Along the lines of how self-deprecating is ...
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1answer
100 views

Word for a system that exhales gas

I'm looking for a word to describe a system that filters certain gases from a space and 'exhales' them outside. What verb can be used to describe that action?
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4answers
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Is it correct to use the word 'etiquettes' for plural?

One of my friends argues with me that the plural for etiquette is etiquettes and for fish it is fishes. I was taught since ever that etiquette is plural as fish does. To support his statement he ...
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5answers
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What's a gender-neutral way of referring to a nurse?

Good afternoon all, In Japanese there is a word called "看護師" which basically is a gender-neutral way of referring to a nurse. I was wondering, Is there such an equivalent word in English? Is there ...
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3answers
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What is the noun for “implore”?

What is the noun form of the word "implore"? I saw some suggestions online for "imploration", but this seems awkward to me.
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Word to make a distinction between license as a concept and a license held

What would you call a pilot's license as a concept, and what would you call a license that the pilot is actually holding in his hand? For instance, a pilot may acquire a Private Pilot License (PPL). ...
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459 views

Word for “official school interest group”

Is there a word that refers to an official interest group held in school where registration is totally optional but members once registered are expected to come? Official means the school keeps ...
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2answers
995 views

“Innovation” vs “invention” [closed]

What is the difference between innovation and invention? Where should we use these words? I referred to Wikipedia but did not understand much.
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3answers
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Technical term for `avoiding responsibility` with decision-makers?

Suppose a parliament that tries to "outsource" their responsibility in various ways (they take the gains but not wanting to take the risks). Of course, the situation cannot last: risks and gains ...
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5answers
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Winter — wintry; summer — summery; spring — ?; autumn — ?

wintry: characteristic of winter, esp. in feeling or looking very cold and bleak: "a wintry landscape". summery: belonging to or characteristic of or occurring in summer; "summery weather"; ...
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“Consist in” vs. “consist of”

I would like to clarify this once and for all: What is the correct use of "consist in" vs. "consist of"? "Meditation consists in/of attentive watchfulness." "The body consists in/of cells." ...
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3answers
384 views

What is a word for “the desire to be considered a victim”?

I'm wondering about this in relation to the notion of a "culture of victimization", when people want to garner sympathy and/or discharge their guilt by being considered victims. The phrase "culture ...
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4answers
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What is the most appropriate noun for 'a person who is ostracized'?

Is there any variation/conjugation of the word 'ostracism' that refers to a person who is ostracized? Similar to 'conviction' and 'a convict'. The word ostracism is used by the author I am citing ...
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2answers
219 views

Contract metaphor for preconditions and postconditions [closed]

English is not my primary language but I'm "forced" to write code and code's comments in English. I'm now trying to develop a PHP code (doesn't really matter this aspect) like this: function divide($...
9
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4answers
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Should I prefer “asker” or “questioner” for a person who asked a question?

Should I prefer asker or questioner for a person who asked a question? Another question and answer on this site give a link that asker is quite legitimate. On the other hand I wonder whether ...
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1answer
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So much is at stake

In this sentence: So much is at stake that courses in foreign languages are often inadequate training grounds, in and of themselves, for the successful learning of a second language. I have ...
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3answers
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How do you say “more to the east”? Easter, Easterer, Easterner, Easternerer?

One can sure write “east to you” or “more to the east”, but if I'm located in London and you're in Berlin, can I say that you're “easter” than me?
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0answers
317 views

Difference between “fluid” and “liquid” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Fluids” versus “liquids”? What is the difference between fluid and liquid?
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3answers
781 views

What word describes a house without anyone inside?

If all occupants left a house for a short period of time (not longer than a day), how can that house be described?
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8answers
1k views

What word describes the amount an object is filled to, regarding its capacity?

Given an object that can hold a capacity of something, is there a word which describes the current amount it holds towards that capacity? For example, if an elevator has a capacity of 20 persons, and ...
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5answers
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Vast amount of vocabulary in English books [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are there 20,000 English words in the average adult's vocabulary? English is not my native language, but I use it on a daily basis. I started reading English literature ...
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9answers
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Is there a term for simultaneous snow and rain?

I'm from Australia where we don't have so many kinds of precipitation. I'm familiar with these: rain hail snow sleet As I understand it, sleet refers to frozen rain but I'm not totally familiar ...