A vocabulary is the body of words used in a particular language.

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Meaning of “non-normative”?

What's the meaning of "a non-normative document"? Does "non-normative" mean "casual"? What's the significant difference between a normative document and a non-normative one?
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6answers
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When should I use archaic and obsolete words?

I'm learning the English language, and while reading Merriam-Webster I often see common words with additional "obsolete" and "archaic" descriptions added to their definitions. When should I use ...
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3answers
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What is the collective noun for a collection of collective nouns? [closed]

murder : crows :: _ : collective nouns Sorry, no multiple choice this time.
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2answers
181 views

Is “pedantician” a word?

Why is someone who is pedantic called a pedant and not a "pedantician"? If a person working in obstetrics is an obstetrician, why is not a person working with words not a pedantician?
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3answers
53k views

Is it appropriate to use 'eagerly' while ending a formal e-mail

Nowadays, I always use the following phrase when I am ending formal email; I eagerly await for your response. Regards, I've seen this phrase somewhere, kind-of a formal e-mail and I am ...
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6answers
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A single word for a person who suffers great loss

Can anybody give me a single word for a person who suffers great loss as in the context below. The word loser is not appropriate: Mike lost everything after his failed business venture. ...
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2answers
147 views

Established as a rule through experimentation or statistics

There's a word that's slipped my mind. It's used for example to qualify findings through tests or statistics as opposed to formulae or hard science. Any ideas?
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9answers
6k views

What is a good adjective for something I do a lot?

I think a lot about various things. While not working, I think about something, and this is what I do during most of my available time. What would be a good adjective to describe that. At first I ...
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5answers
346 views

Is it true that the plural of “chad” is “chadim”?

I was busy at filing tasks today, working the hole punch and manufacturing... er... more than one chad. I consulted the Computer Contradictionary by Stan Kelly-Bootle, which is normally a reliable ...
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5answers
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Does responsibility come with consequences?

When somebody says to me that he “takes full responsibility for” his actions (or inactions), but then requests that I remove the consequences of those actions, it seems to me he does not actually take ...
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3answers
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'Ours' meaning 'our home' - where is it used outside the UK, if anywhere?

In expressions like: Let's go back to ours and have some food. There's a party at ours on Friday. There's a bottle of brandy at yours, isn't there? 'ours' and 'yours' are synonyms for ...
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1answer
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Words: paucity vs scarcity vs dearth

I see these words use interchangeably in various contexts. Is there a formal difference or preference? Please supply relevant examples.
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2answers
49k views

What does “Per [person's name]” mean?

What does "Per John:" mean? From the context of the article I'm reading (article unlinked), it seems to mean "From John:" or "John (said):" What exactly does the word "per" mean when used as such?
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8answers
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What's the difference between a jumper, a pullover, and a sweater?

Following on from a recent question, in Australia we have the word jumper for a knitted long-sleeved garment, typically woollen and long-sleeved. When cosuming foreign media I always assumed the ...
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2answers
2k views

Meaning of “throw some work your way”

I think probably the expression means to find job for someone, Is it a common expression or a word made inside the movie? I talked to him. He said he can "throw some work my way".
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3answers
2k views

what does “fancy-ass” mean?

What does fancy-ass mean in the following sentence: And after that, getting hired by some "fancy-ass".
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1answer
358 views

What does “run down a ball” mean?

What does "run down a ball" mean? Here's a past tense example, in this comment heard after a tennis match: I can't believe you ran down the last ball.
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2answers
202 views

What does “low-growing” mean?

What does low-growing mean in the following sentence? She planted some "low-growing" stuff.
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10answers
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What is a word for a man who has a lot of sexual relationships?

What do you call a man who loves and tries to have many sexual relationships with girls and usually doesn't fall in love with any of them? To clear what I'm looking for, Suppose a guy at ...
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2answers
872 views

Meaning of some sentences from sports pages of newspapers

I was studying some vocabulary about sports pages of the newspapers from a book. The book mentions that the sportswriters are masters of English language and states how well they attract readers to ...
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4answers
302 views

What is “outheroding”?

I have been reading Scott's Ivanhoe recently and have come across a word I cannot find a meaning for: outheroding. In the novel it appears in a discussion of footwear: Fur and gold were not spared ...
2
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1answer
286 views

What is the correct term for diagnosis in automobiles?

I have to provide an English translation of my bachelor thesis' title and I couldn't find a term in the dictionary. At the moment I call it "Development of a car diagnosis application", but I am ...
4
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2answers
2k views

What is the difference between “misapprehension” and “apprehension”?

I can't quite get my head around the difference between misapprehension and its opposite apprehension. I understand the latter, but the former still eludes me.
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2answers
338 views

Is “unseductive” an established English word, or just coined?

In the article of Time magazine (May 17) dealing with the arrest of IMF Chief, Dominique Strauss-Kahn on alleged charges of assaulting a hotel housekeeper, under the title of “The Seduction myth: What ...
7
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3answers
397 views

What is “hership”?

I've been reading Scott's Ivanhoe, and in it Cedric has been complaining of the general lawlessness of England at the time, when an alarm sounds... "To the gate, knaves!" said the Saxon, hastily, ...
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6answers
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Is it supposed to be a HTML or an HTML [duplicate]

I've seen many people who say: This is a HTML page. Yet I've also seen many people who say: This is an HTML page. Are both usages equally correct? Or, which is the grammatically correct ...
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1answer
4k views

What is a fork's single point called?

A fork usually has three points, what are the individual points called? Trident points?
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1answer
1k views

Origin of term “letting on”

I understand what the phrase "letting on" means. It basically means to pretend, as in He continued letting on that he had a lame leg. It can also mean to disclose or reveal the true meaning of ...
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4answers
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Term for “avoiding reality”

Is there a single word which describes someone who is trying to hide from the truth? For example, when my acquaintance's father died, she went on living and believing that her father was still alive ...
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2answers
797 views

What does “hunting” mean in the following sentence?

I was reading a review for a camera lens. I found the sentence there. Slow focus on my 300D, noticeably better on a 400D... Shallow focus field, with lots of hunting.
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4answers
518 views

Suggestions for a word meaning both testimony and reminder?

What is a word that means both testimony and at the same time reminder?
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9answers
14k views

Word to describe “everyday things”

Is there any one word which can describe everyday things? By this, I mean things we commonly regard as things most people do every day, like taking a shower, brushing your teeth, getting dressed, ...
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1answer
1k views

Obscure/archaic/unusual English word-of-the-day RSS feed? [closed]

I seek to embiggen my lexicon. Does anyone know of an obscure/archaic/unusual English word-of-the-day (with authoritative (preferably OED) definition) RSS feed? I've found the OED WotD feed, but a ...
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4answers
9k views

A word for the meaning of “abuse of the authoritative/political power”

I need a single-word for the meaning of "abuse of the authoritative/political power".
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5answers
12k views

Word with meaning of “taking advantage of somebody”

I need one word with the meaning of "take advantage of somebody for personal benefit", is there any one?
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3answers
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Is there a word for answering a question with a question?

I am aware that answering student questions with further, leading questions is sometimes dubbed “Socratic,” but I am asking more broadly about all occasions where someone asks a question and, instead ...
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13answers
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Should I use 10 cent words or $2 words?

In school, I learned to use 10 cent words, so instead of saying: (updated: from a paper that says a scientist doing experiment with fish would make it complicated to say:) All biota exhibited 100% ...
4
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5answers
279 views

Looking for the longest “non-variant” word

I'm looking for the longest English word that has no variants, where a variant might be A singular or plural form A conjugated form A form in another part of speech For example, mouse would fail ...
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5answers
2k views

What's a good word to describe adults who are not yet parents?

Just read this in Emma Donoghue's book "Room". Is there a word for adults who are not parents?
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5answers
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Can sound be “blurry?”

Can sound be considered "blurry?" I have heard of visual things being "blurry." Examples of this include blurry photographs or blurred vision. Is the word "blurry" restricted only to vision? I ...
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2answers
328 views

Is the computer-related term “character” understood by the general population?

The following kind message is common in programming: Your password must be at least six characters long and include at least one letter and one number Would an average person understand what ...
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5answers
3k views

Apart from place names, are there any Native American words used in English?

Apart from place names, are there any Native American words used in English?
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5answers
832 views

A single word meaning to abide in a place for a long time

Can anybody give me a single word meaning to abide in a place for long time? I'm thinking in the context of "to remain in prison" (or elsewhere, against one's will).
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4answers
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Is there a proper term to describe 1/3 of a year (4 months)

I am looking for a proper single work term to describe one third of a calendar year. Trimester does not seem correct as it seems to refer to a period of three months (one third of a pregnancy or one ...
2
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3answers
274 views

What does “a drifty car” mean?

What does "a drifty car" mean? Does it refer to capability of instant change in the speed of car?
6
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7answers
6k views

Is [Its'] a word? (Note the apostrophe at the end.)

I just had a strange flashback to a conversation I had when I was in high school, with a man who was regarded by many members of a particular online community as having an impressive degree of ...
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4answers
4k views

What does “fringe meeting” mean exactly?

I'm aware of that 'Fringe' means 'not major', 'not mainstream'. I hardly understand how 'fringe' and 'meeting' meet as one vocabulary.
3
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3answers
108 views

Can a result be “open”?

I'm not a native speaker. Is it good English to say the result is (still) open meaning that for whatever reason the result (e.g., of a study, of an examination) is not available yet, but will be ...
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4answers
3k views

Linking word for two different ideas

Sometimes I found myself in the situation that I don't know how to link two different ideas in the same message. For example, writing an e-mail: Hello. I can start working on the project, just ...
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5answers
3k views

Does America have its Versions of U- and Non-U English?

In Britain and most of Europe, some form of U-speak exists: old-money language has certain features that distinguish it from other language. In Dutch, it doesn't really have a name, but it is still ...