5
votes
5answers
1k views

Word for someone who always corrects misspellings

Is there a specific word for the type of person who always corrects misspellings? Something exact, not something like perfectionist, grammar nazi or anal. Something that describes the person, like ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

do specialst fields have their own colloquial vocabulary not shared by laymen? [closed]

I saw the following passage in a PSAT study guide. One of the questions is about the use of the term 'hot spot'. Can we say it's being used colloquially and technically at the same time? The question ...
1
vote
2answers
79 views

Is “right hand of” means right hand of anybody else? [closed]

Idiom meaning of "right hand of" Example. Right hand of GOD.
1
vote
2answers
75 views

What are the machines at the grocery store entrance called?

What are the machines at the grocery store entrance called? I'm talking about the 'CoinStar' machines specifically, but what is the general name for them? I'm planning on creating one, but to do ...
3
votes
2answers
105 views

What are the technical symbols used in the margin of a page called?

I research Latin texts which discuss a peculiar medieval practice: the addition of minute graphic symbols into the margins of the page, for example in order to indicate passages of interest, flaws in ...
1
vote
1answer
87 views

Histonic cancer: Ok English? Or, Japanese English?

Histonic cancer Would this term be understood by English-speaking medical professionals? Google shows only 53 hits, and all are from Japanese or Chinese sites. If it is not natural English, ...
4
votes
5answers
334 views

What is the proper English term for polycopié (de cours)?

In French, several universities use polycopiés instead of course books for teaching. The term polycopié can be translated as handout. Is it correct to use it in this case, in which a polycopié ...
-1
votes
2answers
99 views

Addressing women with “Sir” [duplicate]

In movies, mostly around military personnel, female officers are sometimes addressed as "Sir" (Sometimes also followed by a "Um, ma'am, sorry..."). What would be the correct usage here if not using ...
2
votes
5answers
192 views

Term for emotion-eater

What is a term for a (fantastical) creature that consumes feelings and emotions for nourishment? (Google searches amusingly turn up only discussions about "emotional eating" in the sense of people ...
-1
votes
1answer
114 views

Slightly different meanings of “National” and usage

I'm a programmer and I have to name some columns in a database. It's about sports competitions. I have to classify the leagues and competitions in two properties. One of them is if they are national ...
3
votes
10answers
528 views

Need a word for the inability to feel anger

I need a term for the inability to feel anger. Features desired: Single word Prefer connotations of incapacity rather than benefit Prefer reasonably clear specificity to anger More clinical tone ...
23
votes
16answers
3k views

What do you call an event that happens without a cause?

I used to think those are random events but someone over at physics.stackexchange.com insists that randomness means something else so I am at a loss here. Can someone help me out? What do you call an ...
1
vote
0answers
106 views

Theatrologue: what are peoples' opinions on the use of this word in English? [closed]

I often edit texts that have been translated from Slovenian language and it is common that the Slovenian word teatrolog gets translated into English as "theatrologist", a word to which I find I am ...
4
votes
1answer
403 views

What are different kinds of shops based on the size, structure and location?

In my native language there are so many words to mean different kinds of shops based on the size, structure and location. I'm not talking about the types like grocery shop, barber shop, meat shop, ...
1
vote
1answer
127 views

Correct translatation of the German word “Folgeverhalten” in the technical domain of control feedback systems

I have asked various online dictionaries about the translation of the German word Folgeverhalten. At these dictionaries it is translated as "subsequent behaviour" or "following behavior". I am in ...
0
votes
2answers
746 views

Is there a word for start and end of a time period? [closed]

Is there a word used to describe the extremities of an arbitrary time period? The word "weekend" refers to the end of a week, but it's limited to the week and it only describes the end, but not the ...
4
votes
2answers
156 views

Is there a term for a married couple who have the same christian and surname?

My wife and I share the abbreviated form of our name - Alex derived from Alexandra and Alexander respectively. As we are married, we have the same christian and surname when used in the short form. ...
4
votes
2answers
559 views

What are the names for geometric arrangements like 'quincunx'?

A quincunx is a geometric pattern consisting of five points arranged in a cross: This seems like a very specific name derived from the Latin root for five (quin). Are there other geometric ...
6
votes
2answers
910 views

Word for a Rare Feeling

I hope it's not too rare, but at least 1 other person has confirmed having experienced a similar feeling. Small, ordinary things can trigger it, in ordinary situations. Then I sometimes get the ...
5
votes
4answers
7k views

Continuous vs contiguous when talking about files

Files on a file system can be fragmented meaning they're split into several parts that are scattered all over hard disk. This usually means that reading these files is much slower because disk ...
2
votes
3answers
654 views

Term for buzzing or hissing sound often created by vibration

Specifically, I am referring to the hissing, buzzing, S-like, or fuzzy sound that is created when electronic speakers play sounds or music near their volume or frequency limits. I recall having ...
1
vote
5answers
270 views

Is it true that the plural of “chad” is “chadim”?

I was busy at filing tasks today, working the hole punch and manufacturing... er... more than one chad. I consulted the Computer Contradictionary by Stan Kelly-Bootle, which is normally a reliable ...
11
votes
2answers
1k views

Are there any rules governing what we call people from different countries?

people from China = Chinese people from Japan = Japanese people from Australia = Australian people from Lebanon = Lebanese people from Sweden = Swedish Are there any rules that ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

“Trust” vs. “Cartel”

The establishment of trust is quite difficult but for cartel it is comparatively easy. What is the difference between trust and cartel? Does the word "oligopoly" have a different meaning in ...
1
vote
7answers
1k views

Is technical copywriting jargon or style?

I became confused by comments to my answer insisting that Technical writing is jargon using incorrect English words. I also looked through definitions of "prepend" in internet, all with inserted ...
13
votes
6answers
16k views

Cell phone? Cell? Mobile phone? What's the “correct” term?

What's that type of phone called that you don't need a cable for and you can use everywhere in the world (provided there's coverage ;-))? And what differences are there between the regions? ...
10
votes
2answers
337 views

Is there a term that means “oft-used misquotation”?

There are some quotations that people always seem to get wrong: Alas, poor Yorick, I knew him well. [Real quote from Hamlet: "Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio."] I have nothing to offer ...