A vocabulary is the body of words used in a particular language.

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1answer
23 views

Which one is correct to show that “the fan” in not the only one?

Which one is correct? a big fan of yours in millions or a big fan in millions of yours Tanx
5
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3answers
336 views

What does “consound” mean?

Hello and happy holidays. While reading The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, I came across the expression "consound it" in Huck's dialogue parts. "Consound it, Tom Sawyer, you're just old pie, 'longside ...
1
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1answer
20 views

Word for a statement that embodies its own 'theme'?

eg, "People over-generalize." Sort of, 'autological', for sentences.
1
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1answer
43 views

What is the difference between “submit” and “deposit”? [on hold]

I am trying to find out the difference between "submit" and "deposit" these words are very confusing when you visit to a bank and somebody ask you "what is the purpose of you to come here and you ...
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1answer
54 views

How do we know if learning some of the new words are necessary or a waste of energy? [on hold]

Sometimes I receive emails with the name " word of the day" ,but I don’t know how understandable this words are for the others, if I search it on Google Ngram tool I still don’t know this site ...
1
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4answers
81 views

Understandable songs to learn English [closed]

I am not very good at speaking and listening English. Can someone please suggest some songs, which have clear pronunciation of English words, to listen and understand the songs too and also I can use ...
1
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3answers
54 views

Is there a literary or scholarly synonym for an 'origin story' or myth?

I am trying to remember a word I learned in high school that meant "a story that explains why something is the way it is." It's not origin story or creation myth, but rather one word probably with a ...
2
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2answers
552 views

“I'll revenge” vs “I'll take revenge”

Throughout my life I have thought that the correct expression is to take revenge; however, I have also heard people saying I'll revenge. Which is correct?
3
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1answer
52 views

Is “scathingly small” used correctly?

I heard a quote today on the radio from Dr. Michael Fine, Rhode Island's director of the Department of Health, where he used the phrase "scathingly small" (e.g. here) when referring to Ebola's chances ...
2
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5answers
52 views

What's the best word that can be used to describe level of activeness?

I'm looking for a word that can be used in a question like "how is his * right now?", where a possible answer is 'calm'. Another example is: Person 1: Calm down! Person 2: My * is none of your ...
2
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8answers
67 views

A word for not knowing an appropriate word [duplicate]

What is a word to represent a situation in which we feel short of word to be able to express what we want to or what we are feeling .
2
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4answers
122 views

Fear of asking girl out - is called …?

Fear or phobia of asking girl out, fear of rejection(that she would say no or even worse). Here, Soceraphobia (fear of her father/brother) is not involved. Mostly guys are feared by most compelling ...
3
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4answers
66 views

on Sundays and every Sunday

I am curious whether 'on Sundays' and 'every Sunday' are interchangeable. Can you think of any examples that prove they are not? What about "He usually goes to church on Sundays' and 'he usually goes ...
33
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18answers
5k views

Completing something just to finish it despite lack of interest - is called …?

Recently I started reading a novel that I was excited to read. After getting approximately 45% into it, I lost the pace. It started becoming slow and lousy. I thought to leave it unfinished but it ...
1
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1answer
33 views

Administer the patient the drug? Administer the patient with the drug?

Does the verb “administer”, as in to give a drug, work like the verb “give” or like the verb “provide”? Which of the following is better: 1 or 2? Patients are administered the drug. Like ...
3
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5answers
27 views

Better way of saying “in order to demonstrate this”

What is a better way of saying "in order to demonstrate this, I will..."? I already use "to that effect" in the same paragraph. I'm looking for something as compact and concise as "to that effect" ...
4
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4answers
76 views

Is it correct to say “In order to overcome this loss”?

I am looking for a word that I can use in a situation where I would like to say: In order to "overcome" the loss, we have to ... . I know somehow that the word "overcome" is not correct to use ...
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1answer
29 views

What is the difference between “way of thinking” vs “the way they think”

I am writing a short description of a social experiement. The objective is to get a better idea of the way people think. I have some troubles to understand the difference between those two phrases: ...
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0answers
67 views

Is “I am not about this week” correct

We had an English test today and the correct answer to one question was "I am not about this week. I work in Romania" Is this correct and if yes what does it mean?
2
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2answers
92 views

Thanks. You got it

Can "You got it, dude " be used as a reply to "thank you" in informal English?
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2answers
46 views

Is there any expression like “minor fun”?

"Minor fun" or "trivial fun", which I think means that tiny, little, minor, trivial things or actions that is funny or interesting.
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2answers
34 views

Truancy or Skip class

At my school, I realized that most of my teachers use the phrase "skip class/school" while only a few of them use the word "truancy/truant". So, my question is what is the difference between these ...
3
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2answers
140 views

Torturing oneself by emotions is called?

People who love emotions, they love to torture themselves by emotional feelings. Be it real or vicarious. Often see people reading love stories and getting emotional, listening to sad song and watch ...
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0answers
48 views

Looking for an Equivalent to the AWL for Academic Idioms

Coxhead developed and evaluated something called the "Academic Word List" for English Language Learners. This is a list of (supposedly) the most common "academic" terms to be used by students from ...
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0answers
39 views

Word for belief or prejudice that is held, but it is not conscious

I remember reading about an idea of a belief or prejudice that is subconscious. It had a prefix, and it was something like: belief -> alief or prejudice -> ajudice But I can't remember the ...
0
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1answer
61 views

Word to Describe One Who Speaks Politely but with Conviction [closed]

Imagine you are at a debate on a controversial topic. One of the speakers presents her case straightforwardly and with conviction; there is no doubting her stance on the issue. At the same time, you ...
1
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1answer
89 views

Fastest way to learn new difficult words to widen vocabulary? [closed]

I am training for the GRE. I am wondering what the fastest way to learn difficult words is. Recently, I have been using a method that puts a lot of words under an umbrella. For example: Umbrella term: ...
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2answers
37 views

Collective word for these people

I am looking for a word to describe people such as barber, ironsmith, tailor, carpenter etc. People with miscellaneous specialty who would move to a village to serve others who are normally into ...
0
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2answers
52 views

use of the word “assume” in this sentence

Apologies for the bad question title, I lack sufficient vocabulary. From the vocabulary I know I could not find a duplicate question. I am having trouble understanding how the word "assume" can be ...
11
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5answers
2k views

The Equivalent Term for Pharmacy in the UK

In the States, we use the term "pharmacy" or "drugstore," but what is the equivalent in the UK? I checked two sources, but came up with nothing.
2
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5answers
209 views

What is the emotion for being glad of someone getting their just deserts

Is there a word for the feeling of satisfaction when someone 'bad' gets punished? For example, when watching a movie and seeing the villain finally get defeated, the audience feels a sense of... what? ...
4
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3answers
518 views

Word for “taking advantage of non-public resource”?

One is always sleepy at the afternoon, especially after a full lunch. I just had a good doze in a lovely sofa after some reading in a hotel nearby, used the toilet , enjoyed the music, and read the ...
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1answer
60 views

Using Verbpathy as a Tool to Connect with English [closed]

Does anyone use the tool of "verbpathy" in their own English studies? This is a device that lets the language learner connect with the positive, negative, or neutral aspect of a word, phrase or ...
4
votes
2answers
80 views

Why is myrmidon pejorative

Myrmidons were a people in ancient Greece commanded by Achilles, the son of their king, in the Iliad. In modern English, a "myrmidon" is a henchman; a subordinate tough; - I think the word is ...
0
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1answer
30 views

What is the right way to say that, “his credit balance is likely to be in deficit” [closed]

I want to say that that 'x' person spends a lot and his credit balance is likely to become negative. "With multiple ...., his balance is likely to be in deficit." OR "With multiple ...., his ...
0
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1answer
46 views

Where and how do I use the word “apparently”?

Does this word "apparently" mean that something is obvious or does it refer to something that seems true but actually isn't. Apparent means illusion, right? People use this word quite often and I ...
5
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6answers
968 views

Word for inane words used for emphasis

"The most very best you will ever in the universe" There's a word for the category of words such as the above, words that are used to emphasise something without adding any content by themselves. ...
3
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3answers
328 views

Water caltrop in American English

There's a moderately popular fruit found in India known as panifal or singada in Hindi. The fruit comes from an aquatic plant that grows in stagnant or slow-moving water up to 10-15 foot deep. Here's ...
2
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1answer
46 views

English Expressions that mean 'almost always' [closed]

I'm looking for an adequate expression for 'almost always': The sentence I want to use is like "It almost always happens." I think 'very often' is a bit weaker than I want. Any good expression for ...
0
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1answer
44 views

“waiter” vs “server”

Are they really the same in every respect? What are the differences if any? In India, they're always called waiter regardless of the size and exclusivity of the establishment. Is it the same in the ...
2
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1answer
70 views

Origin of Spread Oneself Too Thin

Three questions: What is the origin of the English idiom, "spread oneself too thin?" Is this used as frequently in the U.K. as it is in the U.S.? What about Australia and New Zealand: Is it as ...
0
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2answers
66 views

How far (technically) is a “stone's throw?”

A "stone's throw" means a short distance. Questions: (1) How far--technically-- is a stone's throw in terms of its usage? (i.e., Can you use it for a few feet as well as a mile away?) (2) Is it ...
1
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3answers
72 views

Is there a word similar to infallible that means “incapable of being right”?

The word infallible can mean "incapable of being wrong". The word fallible can mean "capable of being wrong". Is there a word that means "incapable of being right"?
2
votes
1answer
83 views

What does “curfew” mean in the context of a concert?

I am going to buy a ticket for a concert, and the show description says: Door time: 7pm Curfew: 10pm I was thinking that curfew means the latest time you can access the venue, is this correct? ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Time and “look back on” as a phrasal verb

When using this tri-part phrasal verb, i.e., "look back on," what is the length of time it refers to or can refer to? For example, it's common to say: "When John looks back on his childhood, he can ...
2
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2answers
61 views

American words for gas stoves

Please take a look at the following two images: In India, it's customary to refer to the thing in the first image as a "gas stove" and the second as a"cooking range" or "hob." Is it the same in ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Meaning of “tea party”

Of late I've noticed that this phrase seems to be tossed around all the time especially in the context of political discussions. What does it exactly mean? For example, take a look at the following ...
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5answers
3k views

What are these vehicles called in the United States?

I understand the names for various types of cars in the US as well as elsewhere, such as hatchback, sedan, SUV, etc. However there are two classes of vehicles that don't seem to fall under any of ...
1
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4answers
210 views

One word for “The amount paid to a person A because of the damage caused to him by person B”

I know there's a word for this but can't remember it. Can someone please help me figure this out. It also means, amount paid to a king after winning a war by the defeated king. Thank you :)
21
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11answers
5k views

Equivalent of “Excuse me” for “you're not in my way”? Pedestrian bump avoidance

Is there a quick phrase, like "excuse me", that means "You're not in my way; please don't change this fact"? I mean in the context of e.g. passing someone who's on the grass between the sidewalk and ...