A vocabulary is the body of words used in a particular language.

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Is there a word similar to infallible that means “incapable of being right”?

The word infallible can mean "incapable of being wrong". The word fallible can mean "capable of being wrong". Is there a word that means "incapable of being right"?
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1answer
38 views

What does “curfew” mean in the context of a concert?

I am going to buy a ticket for a concert, and the show description says: Door time: 7pm Curfew: 10pm I was thinking that curfew means the latest time you can access the venue, is this correct? ...
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1answer
23 views

Time and “look back on” as a phrasal verb

When using this tri-part phrasal verb, i.e., "look back on," what is the length of time it refers to or can refer to? For example, it's common to say: "When John looks back on his childhood, he can ...
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2answers
42 views

American words for gas stoves

Please take a look at the following two images: In India, it's customary to refer to the thing in the first image as a "gas stove" and the second as a"cooking range" or "hob." Is it the same in ...
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1answer
47 views

Meaning of “tea party”

Of late I've noticed that this phrase seems to be tossed around all the time especially in the context of political discussions. What does it exactly mean? For example, take a look at the following ...
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6answers
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What are these vehicles called in the United States?

I understand the names for various types of cars in the US as well as elsewhere, such as hatchback, sedan, SUV, etc. However there are two classes of vehicles that don't seem to fall under any of ...
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4answers
195 views

One word for “The amount paid to a person A because of the damage caused to him by person B”

I know there's a word for this but can't remember it. Can someone please help me figure this out. It also means, amount paid to a king after winning a war by the defeated king. Thank you :)
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11answers
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Equivalent of “Excuse me” for “you're not in my way”? Pedestrian bump avoidance

Is there a quick phrase, like "excuse me", that means "You're not in my way; please don't change this fact"? I mean in the context of e.g. passing someone who's on the grass between the sidewalk and ...
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4answers
2k views

The word for a man who hunts a dangerous mountain cat without prophylactic? [on hold]

Hello once again special team stack exchange and a usage. I search many hours dictionary for a man goes into woods for hunt dangerous mountain cat or similar enemy despite no protection or ...
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3answers
81 views

Adrenaline vs epinephrine

I just stumbled upon a blog that states that epinephrine is the American name for adrenaline. Is it true? If so, how prevalent is this Americanism within America? And do they prefer epinephrine in ...
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1answer
48 views

What is the meaning behind “wag imagined”?

Today I read these sentences in The Economist "Lying, cheating bankers" “IF YOU can only be good at one thing, be good at lying…because if you’re good at lying, you’re good at everything.” ...
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4answers
110 views

American word for commode

I know several words for the toilet, i.e. bathroom. However I want to know the colloquial word for the seat on which one sits while defecating. I have read john somewhere but never heard an American ...
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1answer
70 views

Words without simple synonyms

Is there a word or concept that describes words lacking simple (e.g. less pretentious, less technical, less subjugating) synonyms, or more generally words without single-word synonyms. I'm looking for ...
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1answer
56 views

A turned on or off car?

Will these expressions sound natural (to native English speakers)? Any better way to say: 1 - A turned on car 2 - A turned off car 3 - An idling car 4 - An idled car 5 - The car is turned off 6 ...
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2answers
39 views

Words having two converse meanings [duplicate]

Many words have several meanings and some even have two converse meanings. Two examples of such words are amateur and literally as illustrated by the following: She is an art amateur. This is ...
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1answer
72 views

What do (or what can) artists do? [closed]

I am attempting to give a title to something I am writing but having a bit of difficulty finding a fitting verb to proceed the word 'art.' I am centering what I'm writing around this quote: "God's ...
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3answers
50 views

I'm looking for a word like “routing out” that also describes a “blind gamble”

When my old dog and I had a regular local park, upon entering, she used to immediately run through all the bushes, hoping to flush out any squirrels. She didn't know if there were any squirrels ...
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1answer
40 views

What is generic name for devices like this?

Well, problem is programming-related, but main problem is a naming, so I guess it's a correct place to ask. I have various type of devices designed to affect environment conditions. Typical examples ...
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2answers
45 views

hierarchical representations of verb meanings

Nouns can quite easily be represented in semantic hierarchies... ...with "hyponyms" serving as specific instances of "hypernyms." Q: Does anyone know of similar representations of verbs? Some ...
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“warmth of one another” or “one another's warmth”

"A companny of porcupines crowded themselves very close together on a cold winter's day to profit from ............ and to save themselves from being frozen to death." I need to fill in the gap with ...
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5answers
813 views

word or phrase for a smell that sparks nebulous memories of times or places past

I sometimes catch a whiff of something that reminds me very strongly, but very vaguely, of a time in my past. Different whiffs for different times. It's not a single identifiable smell and a single ...
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2answers
50 views

Genre restrictions [closed]

How to say correctly: 'law of the genre', 'rules of the genre' or 'genre principles'? For example: — In your fashion magazine no suffering at all. There are no hungry children, old age people... ...
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52 views

How to use the word “piquant”?

I referred the meaning for the word piquant and the dictionary online gives two contexts in which it can be used 1) taste : piquant taste 2) attractive and charming : piquant face But I am seeing ...
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1answer
69 views

What do you call something which is absurd, irrelevant, and institutionalized/departmental? [closed]

I am attempting to describe a college class. It seems as though it is the result of some high-up departmental administrator who wanted to impress their boss. There are a plethora of words that can ...
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2answers
36 views

“One word for ”Has the same features“”

Is there a single word to state two versions of a software have the same feature? I would like to say "Version X+1 is comparable-in-terms-of-features to version X" I cought "isofunctional" online ...
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2answers
71 views

What's a modern equivalent of “fie on thee”?

Is there a modern equivalent to the archaic expression "fie on thee"? I'm aware of expressions such as "damn you" and the like, but I'm looking for something less strong.
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3answers
38 views

Keep shares/stocks for a short time and sell them

I am looking for some vocabulary that describes the practice of buying and keeping stocks/shares for a short time and selling them to gain quick proft. It could be a compound noun. I am not sure.
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1answer
29 views

Persister or Persistor

Computer science uses the term "persistence" to describe, basically, data that sticks around after the device is turned off. The corresponding verb is "to persist". What I'm looking for is a noun to ...
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1answer
43 views

Difference between agenda and schedule

I am not a native speaker. A business friend will be in town soon, and I am trying to draft a file to schedule his trip. He will have a lot of meetings in town and then he need to travel in several ...
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2answers
70 views

Exponent vs. Proponent

"Exponent" and "proponent" seem to have (at least) overlapping definitions in the sense of "one who advocates". What distinguishes them?
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0answers
24 views

“Leave” doing sth meaning stop / give up

Is it correct to say "leave a course" (stop doing it, give it up)? e.g. I took an English course but after some time I left if .
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5answers
3k views

Is there a word for a professional who has a beautiful and neat handwriting and whose work consists of using that attribute?

These days, when we use the computer for everything, it may be very difficult to find professionals who have beautiful and neat handwriting and whose work consists of using that skill. A century ago, ...
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1answer
38 views

Which word is best; “population”, “pick” or “combination”?

Please look at the sentence below. The ________ of actors and actresses is very important in this movie I will make. Which of the following three words fit best in the blank space? ...
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2answers
36 views

differentiating between all that and what

Original-- extracted from the book Scarlet Letter: Like all that pertains to crime, it seemed never to have known a youthful era. My own rephrased sentences: Like whatever that pertains to crime, ...
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3answers
126 views

What's a word that means intentionally gullible? [duplicate]

I'm looking for a word to describe someone that is easily persuaded to believe things that they are aware is likely to be too good to be true. Something along the lines of an optimistic cynic, ...
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1answer
46 views

The term for a long sentence with the point at the end

I recall from my youth a term for a long sentence which hid its meaning or point until the very end. it was used often in academic writing (and since, I was doing much academic writing, I used this ...
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2answers
72 views

Dredge (live by the dredge?)

I've just come across a sentence like this and couldn't figure out what dredge is in it: Anyway, he lives here, in Texarkana, near here, out by the dredge. Now in dictionaries a dredge is ...
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3answers
91 views

A word for “life experiences”

I am looking for a word that has the same meaning as "life experiences." I tried to use legend, but I think it is too big for an individual person like me.
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1answer
200 views

Why is food crazy?

Funnily enough, food is often used metaphorically to describe someone's eccentricity or level of sanity. We have nuts Slang. a foolish, silly, or eccentric person. an insane person; ...
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1answer
94 views

Is there a name for starting a chapter with a quote?

I am writing an article for school, and am trying to find the term used to describe a chapter which starts with a quote; my supervisor has said that there is a term for it, but he cannot remember what ...
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2answers
77 views

What is it called, when a situation is described in a complicated way instead of a simple one?

How to say in English, when one describes the matter in a more complicated manner than it is. For instance, one has two options, A and B; and either of them has to be accepted. One want to say the ...
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1answer
87 views

The connection between roosters and genitalia

It is a known fact that the same word (same spelling and pronunciation) is used to describe both a rooster and a part of male genitalia (I am not sure how vulgar it would be of me to use the word ...
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2answers
139 views

Is majoritively a word?

So I was writing a sentence and the word majoritively popped into my head as a "Hey, why not? Sounds good!" type of word. My sentence was to the effect of: Our GridViews majoritively use classic ...
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1answer
26 views

What does the word “abjection” mean in this context?

I am learning vocabulary and I needed to know the meaning of abject and abjection, and how to use it. I referred Merriam Webster. They gave an example: I protest … this vile abjection of youth to ...
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3answers
68 views

what is the meaning of “sparrow hands”?

Here is the text. "A heavy gypsy with an untamed beard and sparrow hands..." Would you explain that what kind of hands called the sparrow hands in English. is it the hand like a sparrow's claw, ...
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4answers
95 views

What word best means “disdain for the uncouth”?

I'm looking for a word that means: bigotry against, or disdain for, uncouth people. ('Misanthropy' is too general, I think.) This would sort of be the converse of anti-intellectualism. By 'uncouth ...
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1answer
40 views

Futurecast or Forecast

I saw the word "futurecast" in a TV weather report. What is the difference between "futurecast" and "forecast"?
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2answers
51 views

How to distinguish between transparent (water-like) and opaque (milk-like) skin lotions?

In cosmetics there are 2 distinct kinds of skin lotions and some languages (but not English, as far as I know) include distinct words to name them: 1. transparent, water-like looking lotions usually ...
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2answers
154 views

“Slice” vs “Piece”: when to use which?

I'd like to understand when I should use "slice" or "piece", for example: "He's eaten three slices of pizza, and two pieces of cake". Why do I have to use "slice" with pizza, but "piece" with cake? ...
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2answers
102 views

Person who mocks others for mistakes instead of helping?

Imagine a person who warns you not to walk in a particular direction as there is a pit/hole, but you continued anyway and fell into that hole. The person then comes to you and instead of helping you ...