Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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Correct verb form in two sentences

I can't explain why the following sentences are wrong, although I can correct them. (a) INCORRECT — The table shows the average amount of time advertisements on the Internet lasting. ...
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74 views

Why ride? Over ride or pilot?

Why do you ride a horse and a bike, rather than drive it? Why you you pilot a plane, rather than drive it? Why do you drive a car, rather than pilot it? You can go for a ride in a car, but only if ...
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The Case of the Missing Verb, or can a perfectly good word fail to exist?

Is it possible for an action to lack a verb? For example - to answer my own question - there is a verb for smell bad ("stink"), but there is no counterpart for to smell good. Is there?
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22 views

the similar meaning of impress and strike…as

I learnt a phrase said 'strike sb. as sth.' it means to seem to have a particular quality or feature. I think it is similar to 'impress sb. with sty' Maybe it is most common to you native speakers to ...
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Is “have” as in “I have to go” a stative verb or a dynamic verb?

You generally have two types of "have": (1) He has two sons. (stative) (2) He has lunch alone. (dynamic) A stative "have" can be followed by "got", whereas a dynamic "have" cannot: (1a) ...
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In a technical environment what is the correct sentence to use when solving a problem

What is the most suitable sentence to use when answering to someone about a problem that they had and we solved it for them: 1- The problem is solved 2- The problem has been solved
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44 views

“Suppose we have a collection of blog posts where each document was/is a post”

I found this in a book: Suppose we have a collection of blog posts where each document was a post. Shouldn't it be: Suppose we have a collection of blog posts where each document is a post. ...
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34 views

“Posits” vs. “suggests”

I am new to academic writing and keep seeing the word "posits". Does "the author posits" have the same value or meaning as "the author suggests"?
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118 views

“Let alone” vs. “much less” when followed by a verb

If this is Kant's position, it is certainly difficult to make sense of, much less accept. — Kant's Ethics, ed. by Thomas Hill I tend to think that "much less", used in this sense, should be ...
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50 views

page : paginate :: paragraph :?

Is there a verb that means "to typographically format a paragraph" the same way that paginate means "to typographically format a page"? I'm inclined to coin paragraphinate.