Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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Noun & verb agreement

in the sentence "Fourteen of the bones make up the face and jaw." is "Fourteen" singular or plural? The preceding sentence is "The skulls of every human being have 22 bones." The grammar book I'm ...
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6answers
114 views

Verb or noun for - when I am not short of words but unable to speak lucidly

A situation when I am not short of words but confused by the setting. the situation does not let me speak properly/lucidly. I kind of trip over my words. I don't know what to do. The silence was ...
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optional backshifting confusion

In reported speech tenses are generally back shifted. But if what was said is still true at the time of reporting then back shifting of tenses is optional. My question is if someone doesn't back ...
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2answers
86 views

I received an email saying documents are /were

I received an email saying that the documents are/were being processed. Which us correct ? Are or were ?
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0answers
22 views

Using to + gerund and to + invinitive [duplicate]

"I go to school" Because 'to' is a preposition then is it correct to write "I go to watching the movie"? If not, please explain why. Thank you.
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1answer
70 views

a word for 'blbbhlbl'

is there a word for the sound made at 2:19 of this video? An interjection will also do
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1answer
29 views

Can “ were known” be considered as a copular verb?

I have to analyze the valency pattern of this clause "These glorious full colour prints that resulted were known as brocade pictures". Can I consider "were known" as a copular verb followed by the ...
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3answers
107 views

To laugh over vs. about

Most of the time when I need to reference something using the word "laugh", my go-to preposition is "about". However, at times, "over" sounds much more adequate in day-to-day use. The big question, ...
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1answer
56 views

“Have you ever been to … when …” versus “Did you ever go to … when … ?”

Here are two sentences patterns: Have you ever been to the opera when you lived in Milan? and Did you ever go to the opera when you lived in Milan? What is the difference between them? ...
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1answer
48 views

Do fish smell or taste blood in water?

Which is the right verb to use? Is smelling as a verb strictly connected with air or what fish do is also called smelling? I ruled out "detect" as it sounds too formal, or is it?
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2answers
456 views

”We're looking forward to helping you find X” vs “We look forward to help you find X” etc

I’m trying to link the following items into a single sentence: we look forward to help you find X So for example, here are some ways I was thinking of doing that: We look forward to help you ...
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9answers
7k views

Difference between “buy” and “purchase”

Referencing this answer. Are buy and purchase synonyms in every aspect/context of paying money? What I thought that these terms were unit-based: if you pay for a single unit (1 cigarette or 1 ...
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1answer
34 views

“People who” or “people that” [on hold]

I am doing homework and I got confused about this phrase when I was writing. I am not a native English speaker. (...) and the only way to do this was taking control of everything and being ...
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2answers
72 views

Can “they had it repaired” mean that they repaired it themselves?

Can "they had it repaired" mean that they repaired it themselves? Why? I've looked into this and can't find anything specific. Also, I've asked about a dozen people what they think and only one ...
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2answers
45 views

How does “to quieten” differ from “to quiet”?

I recently saw this headline from the BBC: Indonesia seeks to quieten noisy mosques during Ramadan I'm a native AmE speaker, and have never seen this usage (which I am assuming is BrE, due to ...
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9answers
1k views

Verb meaning “giving people sh*t”

I'm looking for a specific verb that mean 'giving people shit' (as in teasing them, keeping them honest). It needs to capture that the teasing is warranted, and that the criticism is correct.
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4answers
238 views

What's with the passive present perfect progressive? [duplicate]

I was taught that we made passive voice using be + the participle of the main verb, without changing the verb tense. E.g., I send letters. (present simple) Letters are sent. (present simple ...
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1answer
20 views

“Offer myself and…” or “Offer me and …”

I've heard the following phrase used in both forms: "James offered myself and my girlfriend a ride" or "James offered me and my girlfriend a ride". My question is which one is correct? I do ...
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couldn't be arsed [closed]

I am in no doubt whatever that this comes from, almost certainly in England and likely in the early days of the labour movement with it's heavy job delineation focus, where the management requested ...
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7answers
8k views

Is a sentence always grammatically incorrect if it has no verb?

Is the following grammatically correct? My friend says the second sentence is grammatically incorrect, but couldn't explain why. I have always been fascinated by statistics. The different ways in ...
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1answer
137 views

Is there a verb that means “to make poor”?

Is there a verb that means to make poor, such as a derivative form of the adjective poor? If not, what would be its best alternative?
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0answers
27 views

Reporting verbs [closed]

In my opinion (as a foreign learner of English language) prepositions and verbs used transitively and intransitively are the most difficult to master. Now my question is that - is it grammatically ...
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2answers
82 views

What is the verb or expression for describing some kids in this situation?

Suppose there are some naughty kids who are playing with each other in a room, they nudge each other and wrestle and climb (?) on each other! I want to tell them to stop. Which verb should I use? ...
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1answer
49 views

Verb tenses and types

I believe that the verb tenses in: She will cry to think that I would leave her are: future simple, infinitive, past (of "will"). Am I correct please?
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Is there a verb form of “Extinct”?

Is there (modern) verb meaning "to cause to become extinct" please? The desired word would have the same root as "extinct". The closest I could find etymologically was "extinguish", but its usage is ...
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3answers
57 views

which is wrong? 1. “What is your suggest?” 2. “What is your suggestion?” [closed]

which is wrong? 1. "What is your suggest?" 2. "What is your suggestion?"
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4answers
20k views

“Will be doing” vs. “will do”

What's the difference between: I will be eating cakes tomorrow. I will eat cakes tomorrow. And, when should I use the first form?
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2answers
348 views

Why does impugn = oppugn?

Their definitions look the same—impugn vs. oppugn—yet they have different prefixes. Why don't they have opposite meanings? Would someone please explain this discrepancy?
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3answers
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“Forgotten” or “forgot” as past participle of “forget”

In US and in UK respectively, which is more popular as the past participle of forget: forgotten or forgot? Which is more formal/informal? Examples: I haven't forgot(ten) you. You will not ...
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2answers
123 views

Is “a group” singular or plural?

I was wondering what number the verb 'to snowboard' should take in the following sentence: A group of men, led by Olympic athlete John Rider, snowboard(s) down the gently sloping hills. Because ...
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3answers
153 views

What is the origin of “GO + VERB + ING”?

The construction GO + V + ING is among one of the first things a learner is taught. Take for instance the verb swim, very often English expresses the activity in the present simple like this: I go ...
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61 views

Identify the sentence that illustrates correct comparison structure.? [closed]

a. The opinions of the teachers are no more valid than those of the students. b. The lampshades at Grayson's specialty store are more expensive than Macy's. c. Jenny always gives her brother more ...
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6 views

Help increase or help to increase? [duplicate]

It will help increase or it will help "to" increase.? With "to" or without?
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6answers
83 views

Other phrases for “burst through the door”

I'm writing a story and I want my character to burst through the door, not literally through the door, however, I didn't want to use the phrase "burst through the door" but am stuck as to another ...
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1answer
35 views

Dropping “to be” in a sentence?

I came across this quote in the novel Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austin: She seems a very pleasant young woman. Was it proper during the time in which the novel was written for people to ...
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1answer
69 views

Is there a name for the practice of placing too many phrases/clauses between the subject and verb of a sentence?

I recently had a discussion with a coworker while editing a document, wherein I thought a sentence was hard to read, because the subject was separated from the verb by a large dependent clause ...
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4answers
825 views

Do you “hit” or “press” a button?

I am currently writing an user manual for a software tool, providing step-by-step usage instructions. I am aware that pressing a button is a perfectly fine expression. However, I'm trying to find ...
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1answer
76 views

Do we plan a strategy?

Is it grammatically correct to say : "He planned a strategy".
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2answers
141 views

When must a gerund be preceded by a possessive pronoun as opposed to an accusative one?

I was recently reading this very interesting post here: When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun? In this thread, it is argued persuasively that we could use either his or ...
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5answers
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Why do we “roll” the car windows down, instead of “slide”

Rolling implies rotation and translation. Cranking implies the motion people used to do before power windows and Sliding is what actually happens to the window. When and why did people start using ...
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1answer
40 views

Proper usage of “engendered”

"His actions engendered a revolution in the Capitol." This sounds a bit off to me. But going by the dictionary meaning, this is legal and correct. Is this correct in terms of readability and ...
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2answers
43k views

Which is correct: “confirm with somebody” or “confirm to somebody”?

I want to talk to someone and make sure something is done. How to express this meaning using the word confirm? I'm not sure whether it should be confirm to sb or confirm with sb. Is there another way ...
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31 views

Help finding the verb

This may be easy for you but I wanted to poll the experts. In the following sentence, is 'loved' a verb? 'Something loved by all gods is pious.'
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1answer
47 views

The previous text (has not | does not | not) written correctly [closed]

I have a simple sentence, but I have some confusion on it. What is the correct choice and why ? The previous text (has not | does not | not | something else) written correctly. I choose "has ...
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2answers
278 views

Two past perfect verbs in the same sentence

Both these sentences contain two verbs (correct me if I'm wrong) that are in the past perfect tense. I'd like to ask how do they occur in chronological order. Though my question is related to the one ...
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2answers
35 views

adding -er to a verb

Can you add -er to any verb to make a real and accepted word? ...word in question is Yelper. I realize that it is a hunting tool- but the questioning party insists that it's proper to add -er to the ...
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1answer
41 views

a number of children has gone to school or have gone to school [duplicate]

Please help, in this sentence is "a number" an attribute or the subject of the sentence?
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3answers
4k views

What is the difference between “lay” and “lie”?

How do I know when to use lay and when to use lie, and what are the different forms of each verb? I'm always getting them confused.
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2answers
111 views

Past Simple and Progressive; depending on the sentence?

My question is based on Past Simple and Past Progressive. I had a test a couple weeks ago, and there was this sentence with 2 verbs that you had to choose one to make the sentence true grammatically: ...
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1answer
47 views

Lie or lay dead? [duplicate]

The context is "The mercenaries lie/lay dead." "The animal lies/lays dead." It's present tense and there's a corpse involved. I've looked it up elsewhere and I just don't understand the ...