Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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Usage of “coruscating”

Can coruscating be used as a one word adjective to describe "interesting and exciting"? Basically the usage is "his interesting and exciting research work" which will end up as "his coruscating ...
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45 views

Which verb is used to tell: check and pass it

I'm looking for a verb that when I'm saying: XXX it, then I would mean: Check it and if it was valid, pass it What should be the XXX? Or any verb that have a similar meaning as the mentioned sentence. ...
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55 views

Can I use 'drenching' to mean 'being drenched'?

I understand 'drench' means to soak or get wet. Can I say 'I'm drenching in the rain' to mean that I'm standing in the rain and getting soaked by it? I mostly see 'drenching' being used only as a ...
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60 views

Classification - There is/are

What is the official 'name' for the 'there is' / 'there are' construction? Is it a verb phrase or a lexical verb? I'd say possibly a verb but it must be the most difficult term to Google.
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46 views

Past simple vs present perfect

I have read many online articles. I've read questions and answers on this site. I still can't get my head wrapped around the difference between past simple and present perfect I know the difference ...
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You “show” someone a picture. You “---” someone a song?

In Maltese, we have a verb meaning "to show" corresponding to "to see/to look", and we have a different verb corresponding to "to hear/to listen": inti tara stampa (you look at a picture.) ---- ...
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5answers
246 views

“I was going to be called Kate if I was a girl”

This is an excerpt from a grammar book by Longman. It was discussing tense and time distinctions and the excerpt is about future time. As you can see in the next example, the reference can be to a ...
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40 views

“To refuse oneself” vs “to refuse”

In which cases can we use "to refuse oneself" instead of "to refuse"? Can you use "oneself" to give more emphasis to the sentence, or are you only allow to use it when you refuse something done to ...
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4k views

“Take a photo” — why “take”?

I don't understand why it's "take a photo". Why take? Is there any rule for this?
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176 views

conceived of as vs. conceived as

When I want to write that some something has been "taken to mean" or "understood" or "interpreted as" XYZ, I sometimes use the phrase "to conceive of something as XYZ, where XYZ usually is a longer ...
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3answers
106 views

What is the difference between “Drop in” and “pop in”

In British English do "drop in to see someone" and "pop in to see someone" have different meanings?
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536 views

People can ‘abide by’ the law, but can the law ‘abide people’?

Time magazine copy chief and copy editor pointed out the grammatical errors of many movie titles, and suggested corrections in the article of Time magazine (May 24) titled “Writing Wrongs: 10 Movie ...
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In academia, to express gratitudes to someone in the Acknowledgement or the Comment [closed]

In academia, when writing an article, in the Acknowledgement or the Comment, if we hope to express gratitudes to someone in a short sentence. Should we say: Thanks to + someone for suggesting ...
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3answers
50 views

Omission of the ''to be'' verb from this sentence

My instructor asked me to omit the ''to be'' verb in this sentence: Her house was across the street, an enormous neoclassical edifice with a formal garden. I tried: Situated across the street, her ...
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36 views

“have” before verb [closed]

I have copied Robert on this email chain as well, as he was not originally copied. OR I copied Robert on this email chain as well, as he was not originally copied. OR I copied Robert on this email ...
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1answer
70 views

use of being in a sentence

What is the grammatical reason for the following use of the word being? Thank you for willing to come : (wrong, I know) Thank you for being willing to come : (right) But what is the ...
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2answers
6k views

“Make sure to” vs. “Be sure to”: Is the first one correct?

These two versions below are used interchangeably where I live now in the United States: Make sure to do something. Be sure to do something. But I always have found the first version clumsy. I ...
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1k views

“Thou hast cleft my heart in twain”

"Thou hast cleft my heart in twain" says Gertrude to Hamlet. 'Cleft' is from 'cleave' meaning divide or split. Yet, I often meet constructions such as 'clefts' 'clefted' or 'clefting' in the writings ...
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130 views

Can 'repercuss' be used as a verb?

Lord Owen, the former British Foreign Secretary, in a BBC interview tonight with Jeremy Paxman used the word 'repercuss' as a verb. It was with reference to President Obama's handshake with Raul ...
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455 views

Verb for blowing up zombies

A zombie is approaching you, but all is well since you happen to have a live grenade in your hands. Is there at all a one-word term for the act of throwing that grenade at the zombie and successfully ...
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427 views

Is “re-enqueue” or “reenqueue” a proper word?

This came up while reviewing a technical document: The algorithm could re-enqueue the id associated with the job ... This has generated some discussion as the word does not appear in the ...
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2answers
269 views

Correct verb form in two sentences

I can't explain why the following sentences are wrong, although I can correct them. (a) INCORRECT — The table shows the average amount of time advertisements on the Internet lasting. ...
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2answers
50 views

A Preceded By B, so which comes first?

I was reading a technical requirement documentation and it says: A Save Event preceded by the user un-checking the "Active" check box... So does it mean: they un-check the "Active" check box and ...
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337 views

Is there a word/term for “verbs which indicate the underlying sentiment of a statement”?

Sorry, I'm not sure the best way to describe this, but hopefully you understand what I mean. Something like the result of the verb(to say) and any adverb(insultingly) = verb(to insult). Another way ...
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27 views

I got it (to) working [closed]

I got it working. I got it to working. In #1, is "working" the objective complement of "it"? In #2, does the prepositional phrase "to working" modify the object "it" or the verb "got?"
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Can you “notify objections”? [closed]

I was always under the impression that you can notify people/organizations/authorities, but you can't notify information/objections. I'm looking at a legal agreement here that says "The Recipient may ...
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1k views

Why are so many important verbs irregular?

In many languages, including English, the most important verbs are irregular. Examples include: to be to do to get to go to have to make The same applies (roughly) to many other languages I ...
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67 views

“A book to be read” vs “a book to read”

Which is grammatically correct: "a book to be read" or "a book to read"? And what is the difference?
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1k views

Dust vs. Undust?

The entry for "dust" from LDOCE says: dust1 (n.) [uncountable] → HOUSEHOLD dry powder consisting of extremely small bits of dirt that is in buildings on furniture, floors, etc. if they ...
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9answers
152 views

Word/phrase for importance being reduced

For example when you stop doing one thing before it's finished, and start something else because you, or someone else, considers it more important than the thing you were doing. The thing you was ...
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1answer
1k views

What is the correct usage of “bring” and “take”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Bring” vs. “take” in American English I used to have what I thought was a good grasp on using the words 'bring' and 'take' until I moved to the ...
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2answers
35 views

“is thought to have been” verb tense

What tense is the phrase "is thought to have been" in the sentence "Bruce Lee is thought to have been the first actor to do his own stunts"? Also, why is it correct to say "to do his own stunts" ...
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Does the verb “unpublish” exist?

I use a CMS (content management system) where a post or comment is visible to all the users (if there aren't other restrictions) when it is flagged as published. What verb should I use to mean that ...
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38 views

What “certain verbs” are [migrated]

Dear friends I want to know what verbs called "certain verbs" in grammar rules because when I was studying some grammar rules I faced with this section ; "The infinitive form is used after "certain ...
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Word that corresponds to “flew” or “drove” when riding a train

My daughter recently journeyed several hundred miles by rail. Had she taken a bus, I could say: "She was bussed from San Francisco to Houston" Had she flown in an airplane, I could say: ...
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1k views

Meaning of “be brought low”

Context (New York Times), The episode has been a sobering lesson in how even an agency that carries some 350,000 passengers over 104 miles of track every workday can be brought low by a seemingly ...
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100 views

What is a “copular” verb? [on hold]

I recently came across the term copular verb, and I would like to know what it means.
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218 views

Can a human “bless” anything?

Does the word "bless" apply only to God? For example, can a human bless anything (such as "bless the day")? Or can only God bless? Note, I am asking about the usage of the word "bless", and not about ...
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56 views

is “imperative” correct here

I am writing a piece of software related to meetings. Participants are invited to a meeting using a button which the command "invite" is written to be pressed by the person who wished to do the ...
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9answers
174 views

Non-negative opposite of “to prefer”

What is the antonym of "to prefer" that does not sound too negative? Merriam-Webster lists several antonyms for "to prefer", but all of them sound a bit too negative to me. In a situation with many ...
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Why present simple not continuous

I have a few sentences here: A) The instructor explains the diagram to students who ask questions during the lecture. Why are "explain" and "ask" used here in present simple, and not in the ...
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13k views

What is the difference between “begin” and “start”?

The children are eager to start the novel. or The children are eager to begin the novel.
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26 views

Verb to be before pronoun in declarative sentences [duplicate]

I saw this sentence in a newspaper cartoon: Not only are you dysfunctional — you appear to be completely spineless as well. Is the verb are in the right position?
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29 views

“Cannot be let to rely on” [migrated]

When I think of what I want to express, it naturaly comes as the following sentence: Self/peer assessment report - This evidence has least value and cannot be let to rely on, because... Is it ...
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5answers
879 views

What does it mean: “… was three days dying”?

Not being a native English speaker, I still like to read in English from time to time. In my current book was written that someone "... was three days dying." Does this mean that the person died three ...
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69 views

Why does impugn = oppugn ?

Their definitions look the same: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/impugn?q=impugn vs www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/oppugn?q=oppugn, yet they have different ...
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2answers
1k views

Origin of different past tenses for verbs with the same endings?

Why do we have a situation where the past of "to blow" is "blew", but of "to glow" is "glowed"? And don't say "flew" if you mean "it flowed". The poem Lovers, by Phoebe Cary has many examples of ...
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Nouns in a series with singular or plural verb? [duplicate]

Which is correct? Cultivation, possession, and distribution of corn is ... Or Cultivation, possession, and distribution of corn are ...
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65 views

“Dream, dreamt” and “learn, learnt” irregular verbs: correct or not? [duplicate]

Often when I am writing emails or any other documents, I would like to use the irregular forms of dream (dreamt) or learn (learnt). But the computer spellcheckers always underline these words as being ...