Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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I don't know if It's the right way to write this sentence

The sentence is the background music that's gone through Louis's mind when he discovered his love for Lestat" and I don't which verb forms would be correct in the relative clause and why.
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Using “to start” as a ditransitive verb

In the Song I Started a Joke by The Bee Gees (I recommend watching this cover – it's amazing), the lyrics contain phrases like […] which started the whole world crying […] This seems to be ...
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2answers
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Is there a word for salivating in response to negative stimuli, as opposed to positive stimuli?

Like when you smell a dead rat your mouth produces saliva and makes you spit a lot. Or when you see something gross, doesn't make you vomit, but your mouth waters you spit a lot.
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+200

“To science the sh*t out of something”

In The Martian movie, Matt Damon (Watney), when left stranded on Mars with very limited resources to survive, says: Mark Watney: In the face of overwhelming odds, I'm left with only one option, ...
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1answer
281 views

Early Modern English second person present tense when verb ends with ‑st

In Early Modern English you normally would add ‑st or ‑est to verbs to conjugate them to the second person singular indicative tense (past and present), but what do you do for verbs that already end ...
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“Trivially translate” vs. “translate trivally” — which is corrent?

Which one is correct? Do both sentences have the same meaning? The table definition does not trivially translate to the underlying data structures. The table definition does not translate ...
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'lead to someone doing something' OR 'lead to someone's doing something'

Under the entry lead (v.), Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English (5th edition) lists: lead to someone doing something example: His actions could lead to him losing his job. However, ...
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0answers
72 views

“If a son strike his father” - shouldn't it be “strikes”?

I am reading The Code of Hammurabi translated by Robert Francis Harper. Many times there are sentences in the format "if one do this, some action shall be done". Here's an example: If a son strike ...
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2answers
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Does the “she was found in violation of…” <-> “she was violated” equivalence have a name?

This is a follow-up to this question: Why is "violated" being used as future perfect with a person as the object? At that question, it was established that there is a jargon/slang usage of ...
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3answers
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Why do you write “occurred” but “listened”?

The past tense of to occur is occurred (not occured), but the past tense of to listen is listened (not listenned). Why? What is the general rule that is applied to make the past tense of a verb?
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109 views

Why is “violated” being used as future perfect with a person as the object?

On Aviation StackExchange, I've seen these: I don't think you will be violated.. He was subsequently violated... Pilot [...] may now be violated for it. ... pilots have been violated... It seems ...
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2answers
33 views

Does “intimate” = “imply + infer”? Or just “hint at”?

I'm not clear on how intimate (in verb form) is perceived. Until I looked it up, I never would have believed (never seen) it used with inanimate objects as subject...I thought to intimate something ...
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1answer
47 views

Do I use “were”, “was”, or “is”?

Sorry for the elementary question, but I am confused. Suppose I am telling someone about a conversation I had with a friend the previous day. Which would be correct? "I asked him if he were well" "I ...
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0answers
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Difference between “depend” and “depends” [migrated]

Could someone explain me the difference between "Depend" and "Depends"? When I need to add the "s" at the end?
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0answers
40 views

Should we always use a prepositional object after an intransitive verb?

I arrived at home. I arrived home. Arrive is intransitive verb and it needs a prepositional object but 'home' is adverb of place and I think we can't use any preposition before it as we were ...
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19 views

Usage of presumed [migrated]

"Everyone presumed that I am weak person" Is this wrong? vs. "Everyone presumed that I was weak person" Is this always right?
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4answers
598 views

Is it possible to use “Achieve” in negative sentences

I've noticed in IELTS reading that there was a sentence as below: disappointing results were achieved by the Australian Academy. I looked this verb up in Longman dictionary, It's been said that: ...
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1answer
65 views

I was reading “cambridge IELTS” books and I had a problem in the meaning of a sentence [closed]

I was reading "cambridge IELTS" books and I had a problem in the meaning of a sentence. the sentence is : (I may have to call somebody out) what does "may have to call" mean?
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2answers
132 views

What tense is “acknowledge” in “provided he acknowledge”?

The Texas Constitution has a sentence that ends with the phrase "provided he acknowledge the existence of a Supreme Being." What tense is the verb "acknowledge" in here?
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2answers
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Simple present, or present continuous?

Which one is correct: Today, she talks to me by phone from the middle of Italy. What is she doing there? She is working on her novel. In the first sentence, is the tense correct, with the ...
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4answers
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What is the verb for knowing that I exist?

English is not my first language, therefore my vocabulary isn't so fabulous. I am describing the later stages of Alzheimer disease, and I am including some of the main key points. For this part ...
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4answers
21 views

Need help understanding Intransitive Verbs in these sentences

I know intransitive verbs are action verbs that have no receiver (or object), such as "She smiled." In the following sentence, "arrived" is the intransitive verb: "Huffing and puffing, we arrived at ...
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2answers
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Names that are simultaneously verbs (and preferably don't share their etymology)? [closed]

My girlfriend yesterday asked me if I could think of any examples of names, in English, that are simultaneously verbs. We couldn't think of any good examples then (aside from "Hope" etc.), but today ...
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3answers
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Is “change” being used as a verb in the following sentences?

I just want to make sure that these examples are correct. Is "change" being used as a verb in the following sentences? Her hair began to change to gray. It’s interesting to think about how ...
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6answers
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Word meaning “to make more efficient”?

I think this question came up in a conversation with a friend...we were discussing how serving lunch could be made more efficient. They could _____ the lunch line by doing this or that. The only ...
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2answers
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Determine tense: I had owned a car in the past [closed]

I had owned a car in the past. What tense does the above sentence has? It's not present perfect (No "Have") It's not past perfect?
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1answer
30 views

You better vs. You have better

Which one is correct? You better visit your family. You have better visit your family. You had better visit your family.
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39 views

What can you 'distort'? [on hold]

You can distort facts, truth, images, signals. What else can you distort? Please give examples of using this verb.
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38 views

What are the differences between the following sentences

When the statement is written... When the statement has written... Is the first sentence using "written" as an adjective? Is the second sentence using the perfect-present tense? Do the two ...
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0answers
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Verbs used as infintives

I want to go home. We come to help him. He was the first guy in our crowd to marry. Why "to go" is use as a noun vs. "to help" is used as an adverb vs. "to marry" is used as an adjective?
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3answers
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Present Perfect Tense - Determine usage case

Present Perfect has two usage case: Case A: Say that an action happened at an unspecified time before now. Case B: To show that something started in the past and has continued up until now. How ...
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11answers
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Word to describe “when someone describes something in too much detail”

There's a word I thought I knew at some point, but can no longer remember what it was. I tried looking up various thesaurus websites to no avail. Similar words to what I'm looking for, but not ...
3
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3answers
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“Gain/acquire/gather/get experience”

According to my Longman dictionary, gain experience and get experience seem to mean the same: gain/get experience: The programme enables pupils to gain some experience of the world of work. But ...
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Verb Tenses - Context Examples

To help me to understand verb tenses better, I have created the following conversations between Sophia and John. What are the ways for Sophia to ask the questions in the "Perfect" tense and "Perfect ...
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“I'm done” or “I've done”

When someone asks whether you have completed a task e.g. shopping, dinner. What should be your answer? I am done. or I have done. To me, the former sentence's formation, Sub + VBe+ Past ...
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28 views

Ellipsis (Gapping) and Prepositions

A simple example of ellipsis is: Peter likes to eat apples, and Mary oranges. (Peter likes to eat apples, and Mary [likes to eat] oranges.) Recently, I've been engaged in a debate about a ...
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2answers
39 views

Should I use present tense or past tense?

Should I use present tense (spans) or past tense (spanned) in the following example? "Dr X's service in providing data to the community {spans | spanned} across mission X (2003), mission Y ...
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1answer
35 views

“Seem to had” or “seemed to have” [closed]

I want to tell my client about the activities our contractors had last night. Which one is correct: They seemed to have some maintenance activities last night. or They seem to had some ...
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2answers
112 views

Proper response to “Let's meet…” [closed]

What's the proper response to this Linda: "Let's meet outside the library." Lucy: "____" A. Is 6.30 all right? B. Yes, let's do it C. How about meeting again? D. I'd like to go to the ...
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2answers
38 views

How to say correctly in the past login or logined? [closed]

A person who perform login to site. This preson: "was login" to site "logined" to site Which version is correct?
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1answer
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How do you describe a project should be advanced?

When you believe that a project should be advanced, which way(s) do you use out of following? Please also advise more native friendly expressions if you have. We will proceed with the project on ...
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“He has yet to” vs. “he is yet to”

He has yet to receive an appointment. He is yet to receive an appointment. Is there any difference in meaning? Is one more correct than the other?
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2answers
63 views

The expression “Call off” as a meaning of “Postpone” [closed]

As a synonym of "postpone", "call off" can be used. But, I can't understand why "call off" has a meaning of "postpone". Please tell me its origin.
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1answer
90 views

Sequence of verbs on a sentence — should I use commas or infinitives?

Should I put the verbs in the infinitive form in the following sentence: As the federal auctions provide for a limited time to elaborate the technical studies, to develop the project and to ...
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Correct tense of verb [closed]

Is this correct? If you have graduated or is graduating from an accredited institution and desire to participate in the FWA Joint College/University Ceremony please contact.... I think it should ...
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4answers
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Word for “to put something you earned into a project to make more money”

I forgot the word that means "to put something you have earned into a project to make more money". For example, ABC __ its profits into a new venture.
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“the sun goes down” vs “the sun go down” [migrated]

The quotation from Cambridge Advanced Dictionary When the sun goes down, it moves down in the sky until it cannot be seen > any more On summer evenings we would sit on the verandah and ...
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1answer
125 views

Usage of “imperative to [verb]ing”

From what I learned, we could use imperative to [verb]ing, but when I read my book, I see this sentence: An accurate analysis of surveys is imperative to building a good understanding of customer ...
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1answer
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What is more appropriate: “weekly meet” or “weekly meeting”? [closed]

We as a group meet once a week, for which we want to create an invite. For that meeting invite, we are confused whether it should be called: "weekly meeting" or "weekly meet".
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Sentence Structure without verbs [migrated]

Can a sentence have no verbs in it? If I say "I went for a run yesterday" then I am using a verb (to run) but if I say "This is a door" then am I using any verbs in that sentence? You can argue that ...