Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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When do I use “are” instead of “is”?

When writing measurements or time, do you use the plural form "are" or the singular form "is"? For example: There [is/are] 12 inches in a foot. There [is/are] 12 months in a year.
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47 views

Is a value something to “indicate” the valued thing?

Sorry for the confusing title. I came across the following sentence and am wondering if the word "indicate" collocates with the word "value" as in this case: The PCS (Print Contrast Signal) is a ...
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1answer
35 views

Do I use is/are with measurements and time?

EX: There is/are 12 months in year There is/are 60 minutes in an hour etc.
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100 views

What is the object of this sentence?

My friend and I got into a heated discussion about direct objects. While both understand what they are and how they work we got stuck on a random sentance that I blurted out. Now, if I say "Mary baked ...
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4answers
864 views

Can “shrugging” only be done with shoulders?

Please compare He shrugged. and He shrugged his shoulders. Is there anything else that can be shrugged, besides shoulders? To me it sounds like duplication when used in this way. I'm aware ...
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1answer
23 views

Felicitated- pragmatics and connotations

This sentence from a major Indian daily amused me: The mother of a Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) constable, who died in the line of duty in Jammu and Kashmir, was felicitated at the 65th ...
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2answers
56 views

Can “they had it repaired” mean that they repaired it themselves?

Can "they had it repaired" mean that they repaired it themselves? Why? I've looked into this and can't find anything specific. Also, I've asked about a dozen people what they think and only one ...
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4answers
574 views

What does “mertilize” mean?

I have been unable to find a definition, or a source for the word mertilize. I've seen it used on TV, in articles, and even in comic strips.
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41 views

There was a rumor +… is/ was [duplicate]

Let's say I'm narrating a past incident in which a sentence goes like -- There was a rumor that Citibank is in debt. Is the above sentence correct or do I need to replace 'is' with 'was' ?
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Which sentence is correct? [migrated]

I didn't go to party. I didn't went to party.
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24 views

Past vs. present tense in relative clauses in the past

Which sentence is grammatically correct, and why? He wrote a didactic novel that set out to expose social injustice. He wrote a didactic novel that sets out to expose social injustice.
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4answers
7k views

“Have got” — verb form and tense

In the following sentence, what is the main verb and in what tense does it occur? I have got a car. There are two possible explanations that I can think of: get as the main verb in the present ...
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28 views

To laugh over vs. about

Most of the time when I need to reference something using the word "laugh", my go-to preposition is "about". However, at times, "over" sounds much more adequate in day-to-day use. The big question, ...
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Use of collective nouns and verbs

I see the British normally use plural form of the verbs associated with collective nouns. An example, "The team have fired its coach" versus "The team has fired its coach". I have been told this is ...
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19 views

Correcting verb in parenthesis

What should be the correct verb placed in parenthesis??? The problem he had solved was actually (write) on the board?
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3answers
92 views

Clauses in Sentences

I understand that a clause contains (in order) a subject, verb and object, like below: He let his daughter. "He" is the subject, "let" is the verb and "his daughter" is the object. But what ...
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6k views

What's the practical difference between “allot” and “allocate”?

I've noticed allot is usually used as an adjective (as in, "your allotted amount"), and allocate is more often used as a verb (as in, "I will allocate some resources"). Any other notable differences?
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Is it acceptable to use “is become” instead of “has become”?

In the King James version of the Bible there is a verse like this: The Lord is my strength, and my fortress, and my song. And He is become my salvation. Is it still feasible to use "is become" ...
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2answers
110 views

Is “a group” singular or plural?

I was wondering what number the verb 'to snowboard' should take in the following sentence: A group of men, led by Olympic athlete John Rider, snowboard(s) down the gently sloping hills. Because ...
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31 views

A sentence with three verbs

Is it okay for this sentence to contain three verbs? In addition, most of Chinese dams, including the TGD, have no integrated fish ladders for migratory fishes, cut off migration routes and cause ...
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What is the correct verb to imply the move of a moveable bridge?

Moveable bridges are the ones that can move, to allow the boats, etc. pass, like this one: For such purposes, the traffic on the road needs to be stopped, so that the bridge *move*s and allows the ...
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3answers
87 views

Meaning of the phrasal verb “divert from”

In this sentence here, do you think diverted from means distracted from or change of course? The second option doesn't seem to make much sense, though. “When the imperial mantle finally falls on ...
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2answers
133 views

Is 'might be able to' grammatically correct?

I've read that 'may/ might' and 'can/ could' cannot be used with 'be able to', but I have seen someone using this, who is none less than Shakespeare. Example: "They might not be able to ask me ...
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Multiple preposition in a sentence [duplicate]

I would like to use both insert and remove in the same sentence. However, I would like to know how I will use the prepositions because the verbs have different prepositions into/from. There are some ...
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2answers
96 views

Hypernym for “to increase” and “to decrease” [closed]

I'm writing a walkthrough for a video game I really enjoy and I came to a point where there is a system that you can change the "power level" of monsters. It goes up and down, 0 - 1 - 2 - 3 - ect... ...
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2answers
60 views

“All I've done” or “All what I've done”? [on hold]

Is the "what" required to come after "all"? Are the following sentences grammatically correct? What is the grammar point here? I understood that there should be a subject and a main verb. In this ...
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Using a Verb in a Sentence [closed]

You need guns and bombs to stop them. Juventus have won Copa Italia. Are these two sentences correct? Why does the first use "need" instead of "needs" and why does the second use "have" ...
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62 views

Is there a name for the practice of placing too many phrases/clauses between the subject and verb of a sentence?

I recently had a discussion with a coworker while editing a document, wherein I thought a sentence was hard to read, because the subject was separated from the verb by a large dependent clause ...
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Spelling etymology of “-il[l]” words

I've noticed that modern English seems to have a very strong bias to spell verbs which end with "-(consonant)-il" with double "l", i.e. "-ill". The overwhelming majority of such verbs (like to will, ...
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36 views

Use of Present Participle

I am trying to understand how to interpret the meaning of the following sentence, John arrived late to the airport, causing him to miss his flight I know that the present participle modifies the ...
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3k views

Sabotaging through purposeful procrastination

In Polish there's a word Kunktatorstwo - trying to achieve own goals through delaying action, e.g. by making the opponent run out of time, making them tire out from keeping their defenses up, or ...
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45 views

meaning of verb 'come as'

How would you translate 'what have you come as?' I've never heard this expression
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1answer
33 views

Verb to speak about legal right [closed]

I have been thinking about it and I was wondering if there is single verb (or maybe a phrase) in English which can describe the attribution of legal rights to someone. Is there a specific verb used to ...
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1answer
52 views

What is the difference between “use” and “utilize”? [duplicate]

What is the difference between "use" and "utilize"? Which one is more common? utilize : to use something in an effective way "The vitamins come in a form that is easily utilized by the ...
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When to use “use” and when to use “utilize” in a sentence?

Sometimes I go through articles and find the expression utilize, I've always been wondering if there are special cases in which it should be used instead of used. Also because google ngram clearly ...
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2answers
261 views

Two past perfect verbs in the same sentence

Both these sentences contain two verbs (correct me if I'm wrong) that are in the past perfect tense. I'd like to ask how do they occur in chronological order. Though my question is related to the one ...
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What does “was had tonight” mean? [migrated]

A friend of mine from USA posted this: "So much fun was had tonight with this fantastic group!" I am not a native speaker so, I do not understand "was had tonight". I have never heard this expression ...
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1answer
16 views

Is there a verb for the act of making an object oblate (or prolate)?

I'm looking for a verb denoting the act of making a circle elliptic, i.e. making it oblate (or prolate for that matter). Is there a single word for it, or do I need to rewrite? I tried searching for ...
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2answers
97 views

Past Simple and Progressive; depending on the sentence?

My question is based on Past Simple and Past Progressive. I had a test a couple weeks ago, and there was this sentence with 2 verbs that you had to choose one to make the sentence true grammatically: ...
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4answers
98 views

The Difference Between “I just love you” and “I love you” [closed]

What is the difference between "I 'just' love you" and "I love you"?
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83 views

verb tense in reported speech

I told Cindy we would not be able to eat American Chinese food again for a couple of years, once we moved to Shanghai. I told Cindy we would not be able to eat American Chinese food again for ...
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271 views

Historical Basis for “To Graduate” Being Only a Transitive Verb

About nine years ago, I received from a quite insistent source the claim that the verb "to graduate" is transitive, and, specifically, that the intransitive usage was wrong. For example, the ...
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2answers
362 views

Can 'enquire' or 'inquire' be used without a preposition?

I referenced Prepositions used with "inquire". I can't pinpoint why, but I'm still wildered about "to enquire of". When can of be omitted, but still retain the same meaning as "to enquire ...
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605 views

Is there a verb for “walking with joy”?

Two good friends see each other after many years. They are happy and have a lot to talk about. They are headed towards somewhere together, laughing. What is the most appropriate single word to ...
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5answers
1k views

Better words for “buff” and “debuff”

I have an RPG environment and I'm looking for words that sound better than "buff" for positive modifier and "debuff" for negative modifier. I simply don't like the words but I'm having a hard time ...
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68 views

How to tell which -ing verbs you can use as a noun?

Example: I like Tom. He doesn't mind my drinking, my nagging, my dressing - I can completely be myself around him. I'm a little skeptical about this usage. Because even though I get some hits ...
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Verb that means “flutter” without the connotation of control [closed]

I need a verb that describe the phenomenon that occurs when a wing (like those of birds, or, for that matter, insects) is caught in a strong transverse breeze. I was going to use the word flutter, ...
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42 views
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Why is “he make his home” improper English? [closed]

Why is the phrase "he make his home" improper English? Use linguistic terms please.
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52 views

how is / are - collective noun

Which one of the below is correct? I think the first but many people use second as well. How are Mike & Chris? How is Mike & Chris?