Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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3
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376 views

Why “ruled supreme” instead of “ruled supremely”?

In this sentence: With George, his perfect manservant, and Miss Lemon, his perfect secretary, order and method ruled supreme in his life. Why is "ruled" followed by "supreme" instead of ...
4
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4answers
14k views

“Excel at something” vs. “excel in something”

I've come across a question while writing an exam Roger really excelled ___ sports A) at B) on C) in D) for My first thought was 'in', later I remembered using 'at' also. I've ...
2
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3answers
236 views

To laugh over vs. about

Most of the time when I need to reference something using the word "laugh", my go-to preposition is "about". However, at times, "over" sounds much more adequate in day-to-day use. The big question, ...
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2answers
20 views

The second verb of subject should be express according to number or not?

He is a man who has a bad heart. or He is a man who have a bad heart. Which one is correct? I tried to search "He is a man who have" and "He is a man who has" on Google but I got quite ...
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10answers
37k views

Is “bolded” a word?

Is bolded a word? I just bolded the important text in this sentence.
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0answers
35 views

Modal Verbs: HELP [on hold]

I am studying to pass the admission exam for my unbiversity in Italy. I found a question of which I cannot find the sense. Should you need any help putting up those kitchen shelves, I can give you a ...
27
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9answers
70k views

Is “errored” correct usage?

If "errored" is not a valid word, then how should I say: The program errored at line 44 I guess I could say: The program threw an error at line 44 But why is "errored" wrong? Is there a ...
0
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0answers
45 views

English Word Bank for list comments/conversation verbs [on hold]

I wish to find all words that state if someone is saying a sentence. Such as 'reported', 'told', 'said', 'says', 'tells', 'tell', 'describe', 'described', 'report', 'reports', 'reporting'. I am ...
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4answers
10k views

“By clicking submit you agree…” or “By clicking submit you are agreeing…”

By clicking submit you agree to the Terms and Conditions. By clicking submit you are agreeing to the Terms and Conditions. Which is correct? Why?
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0answers
35 views

Why do these Active voice sentences seem like Passive voices? [closed]

For all the grammaratis, How are the following two sentences in active voice? The rows of chairs are placed the wrong way. There is also a limited amount of parking. It will be great if the ...
8
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3answers
536 views

When should I use “to do” and “to doing”

folks Here are two sentences that I find difficult to understand the grammar during my reading. Last year, two of her ministers suggested that convicted tycoons be pardoned if they could contribute ...
1
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2answers
79 views

Verb tenses and types

I believe that the verb tenses in: She will cry to think that I would leave her are: future simple, infinitive, past (of "will"). Am I correct please?
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1answer
31 views

Sequence of verbs on a sentence — should I use commas or infinitives?

Should I put the verbs in the infinitive form in the following sentence: As the federal auctions provide for a limited time to elaborate the technical studies, to develop the project and to ...
3
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4answers
991 views

Usage of the word suicide - validity of 'suiciding'

Is 'suiciding' a valid word by itself ? I have very rarely come across suicide being used in this form. Mostly, you see it being used with the prefix 'commit' as in 'committing suicide' rather than ...
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0answers
24 views

Illegal use of verb “to be”? [on hold]

I'm confused about verb "to be" usage Is there any rule which describes Where/When Not to use the verb "to be"? Is there any specific case where the use of verb "to be" considered as unnecessary?
2
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1answer
67 views

I'd like to know which one is 'the main verb' in the given sentence [on hold]

One fine summer morning at the beginning of harvest, in 1771, I think it was, Mr Earnshaw, the old master, came downstairs, dressed for a journey.
2
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4answers
70 views

To raise/lower the blinds or to draw the blinds?

I'm an English learner and I'd like to know which verb should I use when using the word venetian blinds. Do you say 'to raise/lower the blinds' or 'to pull the blinds up/down?' or 'to draw the ...
3
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0answers
47 views

Verbs like “go” and “come” which can be followed by another verb directly?

With most English verbs (apart from modals), if you want to put another verb after it, you have either put "to" in front of the verb or use the gerund (if such a construction is even acceptable). For ...
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1answer
49 views

I’m learning English [closed]

Given this matrix sentence: Jack is not the kind of man ____ work Then which of these is the correct choice to fill in the blank, and why? had avoided avoiding to avoid avoids
4
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3answers
298 views

Can adjectives be placed in front of verbs, e.g. “The duck was busy diving for food”?

The duck was busy diving for food. The duck was busily diving for food. Are both sentences grammatically correct? If the first one is correct, does it mean that adjectives can be placed ...
0
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0answers
21 views

Is there a term for nouns that describe the performance of a verb?

There are nouns that describe the performance of, or ability to perform a verb? E.g. perception / perceive communication / communicate collaboration / collaborate Is there a term for these nouns ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Using “Suggest”

Is this correct: "They suggest Mr. Black to coach the young boy". I know the use of "suggest" verb, but the thing is in the sense of sentense. They don't come to Mr.Black and in person say he needs ...
0
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4answers
51 views

Use of “this was suggested to me by…”

I say to my friend Mark: "You should read this book". Later, Mark talks with another person about this and says: "This book was suggested to me by a friend". Is this correct? Does it sound natural or ...
0
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1answer
36 views

Adjective after Verb in “He looks tired” [on hold]

How do we call the verb "looks"? Is it stative verb? How do we call the adjective "tired"? Any linguistic term to call it? Is it attributive adjective?
0
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1answer
79 views

The verb “to lean”

I have a question regarding the usage of the verb "to lean". From the dictionary I understand that the verb "to lean" has, among others, the following meanings: To bend or slant away from the ...
5
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3answers
127 views

Difference between “evade X” and “sidestep X”?

Please consider the following sentences In the journalist meeting, the politician evaded the questions about riots. in the journalist meeting, the politician sidestepped the questions about ...
1
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2answers
534 views

“The below attachment” vs “The attachment Below” [duplicate]

In office email communication, people constantly write "See the below attachment". However, I have a problem with this because I feel as though the word below should be placed after 'attachment' not ...
2
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2answers
3k views

“Regress” vs. “retrogress”

What do each of them mean exactly? Is either (or both) the opposite of "progress"? Could someone please explain the difference? To add some context: When I look up the definitions I see the ...
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4answers
511 views

Can someone help with these 2 GRE verbal questions?

Requirement: fill the blank with 2 words choosen from this list, each word should give the sentence the same meaning. Modern agricultural practices have been extremely successful in increasing ...
5
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2answers
12k views

“Starting with” vs. “starting from”

I would like to ask about the difference between the two phrases starting with and starting from. Take the following two sentences for example: Please give me all the names starting with A. ...
0
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1answer
105 views

English grammar, verb-tense exercise, “Next month we […] married for ten years.”

Next month we......married for ten years. a. shall have been b. have been c. shall be being d. shall be My instinct is telling me that a. is the correct answer because will is ...
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3answers
12k views

“Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for your coming”

Consider "Thank you for coming" and "Thank you for your coming". Would the latter one be grammatical? Why? Is it possible to recognize latter "coming" as noun? Some say you need no pronoun because it ...
2
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2answers
31 views

Pictographs and other types of writing

If someone is writing in pictographs, would the correct verb to describe the action be, "to write"? Or would it be to depict or something along those lines?
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4answers
18k views

“Haven't you?” or “don't you?”

What is the right question tag (in British English) when we use the verb have? I have interviewed a few native speakers and none of them could explain why sometimes they prefer "haven't/hasn't" and ...
8
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2answers
2k views

what does “it's time I told you” mean and why past tense here? [duplicate]

I'm watching Suits TV Series, and there was something that caught my attention. 2 guys meet, have a drink, chat, and then one guy says: I mean it's time I told you. I made a deal with Darby to ...
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1answer
25 views

Backshift with a past continuous

Is it correct when using reported speech to say: Jan said that on the weekend she cycled and went hiking rather than Jan said that on the weekend she cycled and had gone hiking? Tks Jan
2
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1answer
42 views

It's the third time he called / has called

I'd like to know if there's a specific grammar rule about sentences like "it's the second/third (and so on) time" Should I always use present perfect?
3
votes
1answer
102 views

Noun & verb agreement

in the sentence "Fourteen of the bones make up the face and jaw." is "Fourteen" singular or plural? The preceding sentence is "The skulls of every human being have 22 bones." The grammar book I'm ...
0
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2answers
340 views

Two past perfect verbs in the same sentence

Both these sentences contain two verbs (correct me if I'm wrong) that are in the past perfect tense. I'd like to ask how do they occur in chronological order. Though my question is related to the one ...
1
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1answer
48 views

Do I use 'do' or 'does' in this sentence: 'How do the imagery and/or metaphors used evoke suggestion?'

I'm not sure which verb to use in this sentence - do or does? Your thoughts appreciated! I think the problem is that the verb refers to a singular and plural noun.
2
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2answers
76 views

Direct object before indirect object

In this article on the changes in English grammar the author says: How untrammelled the English passive is, may be seen in the fact that, not content with a construction like “A book was given ...
0
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3answers
58 views

What verb akin to “refine” more clearly describes improving a skill that somebody is already good at?

What other verbs can be used to say "refine analytical skills"? I found "polished" and "sharpen," but I am interested in something better if there are any. The verb shouldn't indicate weak skills, but ...
1
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3answers
150 views

Is the sentence “I want to take a rest” wrong?

I heard that we should use "I want to rest" instead of "I want to take a rest." I also heard that "I want to take a rest" is not a sentence a native speaker would use. Is that correct? Should we ...
0
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0answers
38 views

Rest vs have a rest [duplicate]

Perhaps this question should have been asked on ELL, but I will try here and move there if fail here. There are verbs (currently I've found rest, walk and another one I'd better not cite) which can ...
1
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2answers
133 views

Past Simple and Progressive; depending on the sentence?

My question is based on Past Simple and Past Progressive. I had a test a couple weeks ago, and there was this sentence with 2 verbs that you had to choose one to make the sentence true grammatically: ...
0
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1answer
59 views

Why doesn’t autocorrect software like “unauthorises”?

I was writing some documentation and trying to write a sentence that ran like this: It then unauthorises the transaction. I soon realised this wasn't a word, and it kept correcting this to ...
5
votes
4answers
13k views

Is 'quantitate' a synonym for 'quantify' or just a misnomer?

I have always used quantify, but have been encountering quantitate more and more in scientific literature. Is quantitate a "valid" verb and a synonym for quantify? Otherwise is there a subtle ...
5
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7answers
6k views

Is it acceptable to begin a declarative sentence with “Am”?

I want to know firstly if it's grammatically correct to start a declarative sentence with "Am". For example: Am excited about the game today. Secondly, if it is grammatically incorrect, then I ...
0
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2answers
39 views

Confused about use of verbs in conditional sentence

I'm a bit confused about the use of verbs in a conditional sentence. This is what I'm trying to say: Your career would be in better shape if you would spend as much time worrying about your own ...
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2answers
99 views

verb tense in reported speech

I told Cindy we would not be able to eat American Chinese food again for a couple of years, once we moved to Shanghai. I told Cindy we would not be able to eat American Chinese food again for ...