Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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The meaning of 'be of' [closed]

What about such a statement that I found in one of the books for ESL learners: 'what is it of?' or 'what are they of?' What's the meaning of 'be of' here?
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173 views

Word for “collecting money for a special event from a group of people”

What is the English word for "collecting money for a special event from a group of people"? For example, say some friends are planing a party. Each one has to contribute some amount of money to the ...
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355 views

Flexibility of English: Always so?

The other day I read a question about nouns being used as verbs. An answer informed that in English any word can be used as a verb, but that it is not so in other languages. Beyond verbs, English is a ...
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175 views

Opened vs open?

Is there are rule when to use opened vs open? I always get confused even though I've been speaking English as the dominant language for more than half my life. E.g. Is the door open(ed)? Which ...
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145 views

Preposition for “to be qualified”

Would you please tell me whether the following fragment is grammatically correct? ...led me to be qualified in various science Olympiads. For instance, I ranked 21st among... I know that ...
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76 views

“To mentor someone during a project” vs. “to mentor someone on a project”

..., whom I mentored during his final semester's project. ..., whom I mentored on his final semester's project. Which of these two is grammatically correct? Since I am not talking about ...
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87 views

Can 'repercuss' be used as a verb?

Lord Owen, the former British Foreign Secretary, in a BBC interview tonight with Jeremy Paxman used the word 'repercuss' as a verb. It was with reference to President Obama's handshake with Raul ...
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165 views

Word for “to put something you earned into a project to make more money”

I forgot the word that means "to put something you have earned into a project to make more money". For example, ABC __ its profits into a new venture.
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98 views

Why does the word “budge” always come in negative form?

I came across the word "budge" in a dictionary, and it said about this word: "Usually used in negative". Why does this specific word always come in negative form?
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107 views

Is there a difference between “to air” and “to broadcast”?

What is the difference, if any, in the use of the verbs to air and to broadcast?
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133 views

Is there a verb for “to make something Spanish”?

I'm not entirely clear how you would describe a verb that fulfils this function. I'm looking for a word equivalent to "gallicise", "americanise" or "hellenise", but for Spain equivalent. Is there such ...
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What's the difference between “speak” and “talk”, grammatically speaking?

There are a number of questions (example, example) that deal with the slightly different connotations of the words "speak" and "talk". However, there also seem to be some grammatical differences ...
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106 views

“We provide you the ideal environment”

I wonder if I can also write "We provide you the ideal environment" or only "we provide you with the ideal environment"
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80 views

we take safety measures, do we also 'take' control measures?

Someone provided me with a PowerPoint presentation and instructed me to convert it into a word document with sentences rather than point form notes. Here is what the PowerPoint slide said: "Control ...
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54 views

“A swashed H” - valid description?

Can the typography term "swash", meaning a flourish on a letter or character, be used as a verb?
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89 views

How do you parse the sentence “He had Elizabeth read the letter aloud.”?

The Stanford parser gave the following output. I think the word "read" should be tagged with VBN (past participle). (ROOT (S (NP (PRP He)) (VP (VBD had) (S (NP (NNP ...
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66 views

Omitting “that is/that are” and “its/their”

The two works are similar and it is not just because they are both from franchises (that are) notorious for (their) poorly-written characters. Is it acceptable to omit the "that are" in the ...
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11 views

Singular or Plural Verb [duplicate]

Which is correct? One in five kids are abused. One in five kids is abused.
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Method of forming verbs [closed]

In my exams a type of question is coming like - "Change into verb forms" and questions are given below. Are there any methods of forming verbs, or do we have to learn all the verb, adjective, ...
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116 views

“Let alone” vs. “much less” when followed by a verb

If this is Kant's position, it is certainly difficult to make sense of, much less accept. — Kant's Ethics, ed. by Thomas Hill I tend to think that "much less", used in this sense, should be ...
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Meaning of “dogmatic” in “there was a dogmatic gathering in the neighborhood”

and whenever she heard a large word she said it over to herself many times, and so was able to keep it until there was a dogmatic gathering in the neighborhood, then she would get it off, and ...
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117 views

How to correctly express an intention to work on a certain day instead of working on another day?

How to say "I will work on Saturday instead of working on Tuesday" in a more natural fashion? I guess the verb will be constructed like "work or make" + "out or off or ?", but what is the exact ...
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142 views

Verb to describe water “hitting” an object from a relatively high place?

Example: A pan being hit by a continuous flux of tap water. I think hit is too strong for this sentence? Is there a better verb to use?
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42 views

Learn about their business or learn their business? Comma usage in a list of verbs

Tribal Fusion is an online advertising provider that helps brands learn about, reach and better engage their audiences. OR Tribal Fusion is an online advertising provider that helps brands learn, ...
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203 views

Verb to use to describe a photograph “losing” its colors?

At first I wanted to just write: "A photograph slowly losing its colors." But I think losing isn't the right verb here. What can I use instead of losing? (I want to keep the word colors.)
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Is “curate the market” common usage of “curate”?

I found New York Times (November 25) article titled “Helpful definition of modern author” intriguing. It provides humorous definitions of book-related terminologies such as authors, publishers, ...
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“Want to relieve from” vs. “want relief from”

Want to relieve from academic pressure. Want relief from academic pressure. I think the former one is more proper but my teacher said the latter one is correct.
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Can the verb “intake” be used intransitively? [closed]

Can a combustion engine be said to intake oxygen?
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175 views

“Recover” vs “Recuperate”

Often times, I use to verb to recover to state that somebody is returning to normal health after having been ill, for instance: he is recovering from illness Recently, I've heard somebody using ...
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Verb for being part of a team

One can lead a team. But what verb is best used for not leading but just being part of the team? That is, what verb belongs in the blank in the following sentence: One can _ a team. I am ...
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69 views

The meaning of “feel my conversation in quotation marks”? [closed]

What does the last part of the below sentence mean? It looks to me grammartically incorrect. Does it mean "The most familiar things (X,Y,Z) makes me feel at a remove, amd makes me feel that my ...
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110 views

Definition clarification for “effervesce”

I was wondering about one of the meanings of effervesce, "give off bubbles". I wonder if you could use effervesce for a solid, and how it's used in a sentence.
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103 views

What is the meaning of the italicized “do” in this sentence?

A child meets this kind of discipline every time he tries to do something, which is why it is so important in school to give children more chances to do things, instead of just reading or ...
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143 views

nowadays with verb or verb+ing form

Does anyone know why B is better than A ? A. Nowadays, public health is a topic that starts to get growing attentions. - B. Nowadays, public health is a topic that is starting to get ...
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107 views

Proper verb for power outage

What verb is used for power outage? Power goes out everyday in the morning. Is "goes out" correct verb for power outage or there is any other verb for it. And what verb is used for power come ...
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166 views

What is the word for finishing/doing a dare?

Like when there is a "challenge" or a "mission" you can "accomplish" it. What word can you use for a dare. When I dare a person to do something and he does it what does he "do". "dare accomplished"? ...
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185 views

verbs with two direct objects

In German the verb fragen takes 2 direct objects. Is it the same in English? I ask you something. Or is the person being asked considered an indirect object? If so, can I reformulate it using ...
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467 views

Why is “afford” always accompanied with “can”?

afford means "to have enough money or time to be able to buy or to do something". Why is it used with "can"? Why don't people simply say "I don't afford it" instead of "I can't afford it"? ...
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317 views

To use “being” or not to

Which sentence is correct and why? The World Cup is held every four years. or, The World Cup is being held every four years.
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59 views

Verbs while using if

If you want to talk about a possibility or something you would like to be different you can say "If I were taller", "If you were faster". You use the verb in past tense. Is it correct? But what about ...
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There seems to be a subtle difference between the infinitive form of the verb 'to be' after a verb and the inflected form of the same; what is it?

There seems to be a subtle difference between the infinitive form of the verb 'to be' after a verb and the inflected form of the same; what is it? This effect, if there is one, seems most noticeable ...
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164 views

Why “Daddy” in this sentence was written with a capital D?

Why is Daddy in this sentence written with a capital D? Her love letters to and from Daddy were in an old box, tied with ribbons and stiff, rigid-with-age leather thongs. This sentence is from ...
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558 views

Archaic conjugation of common verbs?

I'm looking for an online resource to list conjugation of some of most common English verbs (to be, to get, to do, to have etc.) in their archaic (Early Modern) forms. In particular, I'd be interested ...
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Does ‘the mighty’ take a verb in plural form as in “the mighty are rendered helpless”?

There was the following sentence in the article of Time magazine’s November 25 issue under the title, “John F. Kennedy's Assassination and the Conspiracy Industry.” “This whiplash convergence of ...
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30 views

What is correct between the two sentences?

You can live peacefully without your wants, but your life can be miserable with all your wants within your reach. You can live peacefully without your wants, but your life can be miserable with all ...
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232 views

“provide” vs. “provide with”

I am wondering if the following sentence is correct: We add the information their study provides with to our article. The context is: their study provides with some information. And we add the ...
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The pronunciation of “ate”

I was talking to some friends and I said "I ate (/et/) chocolate yesterday...". Then my friend corrected me: "you ate (/eit/) chocolate...". I repeated my sentence with the /eit/ pronunciation and we ...
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150 views

What is the difference between “start off” and “start”?

For me they both seem interchangeable, but I suspect there should be at least subtle difference in meaning. When it's more appropriate to use "start off" instead of just "start"?
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104 views

“Most of our generation only knows/know him by repute.”

I stumbled at this construction today. Usually I have an intuition of English grammar from past reading that serves me well - but this time both of the versions sound right. "Most of our generation" ...
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Explain about present perfect tense [duplicate]

What is difference of these sentences?where can i used it? "i have walked since in the morning" "i have been walking since in the morning"