Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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Verb mix-up in a sentence

I have this sentence, and I have a feeling that the verbs and subjects do not agree with each other, and it continues to bother me. How can I fix it? Furthermore, both mates in a couple could also ...
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287 views

Correct verb form in two sentences

I can't explain why the following sentences are wrong, although I can correct them. (a) INCORRECT — The table shows the average amount of time advertisements on the Internet lasting. ...
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36 views

Offers home delivery vs home delivers

In which of these 2 sentences is the verb "Home deliver" used correctly, in compliance with the rest of the sentence? ABC offers home delivery of pharmaceuticals, compounded medications, and wellness ...
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2answers
342 views

“Baby is creeping” vs. “baby is crawling” in AmE

Years and years ago, I remember reading in a book on AmE usage that the phrasal turn a baby creeps before it walks was to some extent more common to AmE than to BrE, which preferred exclusively the ...
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6answers
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How is “Can anyone tell me how can I solve this” wrong?

I posted a question somewhere that said... Can anyone tell me how I can solve this? ...but someone edited it to... Can anyone tell me how can I solve this? ...and it was accepted. That's ...
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13answers
282 views

A word for reading something thoroughly until one understands it well? [duplicate]

I was wondering if there was one word in English for "to read something thoroughly until one understands it well"? I am trying to translate a word which has this meaning in Chinese. Thanks.
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61 views

It the phrase “They identify themselves as Pacifist, but the EU as an arrogant power” grammatical?

Is this phrase grammatical? They identify themselves as Pacifist, but the EU as an arrogant power. Is a verb necessary in the second part of the sentence?
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52 views

“How to *verb* this thing *another verb*…” vs. “How to *verb* this thing TO *another verb*…”?

Which one from the following two variants is the correct one? How to make this thing to work...? How to make this thing work...? I'm not an English speaker, but for me, the first variant sounds ...
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1answer
44 views

Verb meaning “selling charitably”

What term can you use to describe the act of "selling something charitably"? "Donated" is close, but it is referring to giving something away. "Graciously sold" is too wordy. I'm thinking of using ...
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3answers
377 views

A verb for transforming something into currency

I need a verb that expresses the concept of transforming a raw material into currency, as in this sentence "The bitcoin manufacturing process currenciates digital information." New coinages are fine ...
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1answer
55 views

“Suppose we have a collection of blog posts where each document was/is a post”

I found this in a book: Suppose we have a collection of blog posts where each document was a post. Shouldn't it be: Suppose we have a collection of blog posts where each document is a post. ...
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2answers
124 views

Why ride? Over ride or pilot?

Why do you ride a horse and a bike, rather than drive it? Why do you pilot a plane, rather than drive it? Why do you drive a car, rather than pilot it? You can go for a ride in a car, but only if ...
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203 views

Usage of the word suicide - validity of 'suiciding'

Is 'suiciding' a valid word by itself ? I have very rarely come across suicide being used in this form. Mostly, you see it being used with the prefix 'commit' as in 'committing suicide' rather than ...
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2answers
132 views

Which verbs apart from the pure copula follow the existential 'there'?

The existential 'there' is usually followed by a form of the verb 'to be', used as a pure copula. For instance, rather than saying, a wrench is on the bench, you'd say there's a wrench on the bench. ...
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1answer
111 views

Can we 'do evil'?

On another post discussion has moved to what one can and cannot 'do'. We 'do our duty', we do our homework' and we 'do the washing-up'. But we cannot 'do dancing', 'do driving', or 'do charity'- or ...
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2answers
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“ It was a pleasure knowing”, “It was a pleasure to have known”, or “It was a pleasure to know”?

I am in the process of ordering a headstone for my dad and I wish to have the words It was a pleasure to have known (as opposed to the more traditional "in loving remembrance", "in memory of", ...
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3answers
128 views

How similar or different are “recant”, “repudiate”, “renounce” [closed]

Recant, repudiate, renounce are synonyms of abjure. I'm unclear as to how these terms may be utilized in different sentences. I will be delighted to see them all in one sentence. I seek efficient ...
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2answers
214 views

“He denied having killed him” vs “He denied he had killed him”

I'm trying to understand the perfect aspect of the verbs and I am not sure whether both are correct: He denied having killed him He denied he had killed him. If not, what is the problem? ...
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79 views

singular event with singular verb [duplicate]

Is the use of the contracted negative form of Do, the DON'T, in reference to a singular event or action acceptable in formal writings as is in song lyrics composition?
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2answers
286 views

“Fire” a weapon before firearms existed?

Did the verb “fire a weapon” exist before the actual introduction of firearms on battlefields? More specifically, does it make sense for a creative work to have archers (or whatever ranged weaponry) ...
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1answer
60 views

“These findings are critical [to inform/for informing] future research” [duplicate]

In this sentence, would you use "to inform" or "for informing"? These findings are critical ______ future research Likewise, would you use "to understand" or "for understanding" in the ...
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1answer
64 views

Subject Verb Agreement

In what ways did the points made by the writer in the introduction contradicts her conclusion? (in the question listed above, shouldn't "contradicts" be written as "contradict" - since we are ...
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1answer
155 views

Which is correct sentence? Use of verb with would [duplicate]

I am having little difficulty with the use of would. Here are two examples that are making me confused about use of verb with would. What would happen if he loses the match? What would happen if he ...
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94 views

One Word Alternative for “Increase Productivity”

Is there a single English word (preferably a verb) which can replace the phrase "increase productivity" or "increase your productivity"?
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228 views

have gone to or have been to?

I saw the following sentence by a contributor at alt.usage.english. I am puzzled by his usage of 'have gone to'. Why didn't he say 'have been to'? I always think 'have been to' is about experience, ...
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1answer
298 views

Is “did you thought” a valid expression? [closed]

I saw a picture earlier that had a line that said "Did you thought, that was me?" and wondered, "Isn't it supposed to be 'Did you think [...]'?". However, after using Google, I found this phrase ...
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1answer
165 views

If I “assign” someone a task, what is the correct verb for “unassigning” them? [duplicate]

I am developing some software where users are assigned tasks. They will see a date and time for when they were assigned to the task, but if they were later removed from the task, there will be a date ...
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3answers
88 views

Using objective pronouns as the subject of a verb, when is it okay?

I just have a little question about using objective pronouns (me, him, her) as the subjects of verbs. 1) They were a peculiar couple, him being a traditionalist and her being more open-minded. ...
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2answers
71 views

Should “afford” be transitive in “my chosen path has afforded (to) me unique opportunities”?

In a college essay I wrote a sentence that reads: Sixteen years later, my chosen path has afforded to me unique opportunities, limitless learning, and potential for growth. Should I use the verb ...
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3answers
84 views

to fire/ terminate/ lay off

What verb would sound more like a legal term (to be used in documents) if one wants to write that he fires a worker from director's position? To fire? To terminate position?
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3answers
36 views

Verb for “to share an environment”

I was just wondering if there is a verb for "to share an environment", the word needs to depict how a non-indigenous organism can share an environment with an indigenous organism in harmony. Regards, ...
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1answer
63 views

“Fudge” vs. “dodge” (an issue, question, etc.), and “fudge” as another term for “cheat” in AE

In AE, can "fudge" and "dodge" be used just about interchangeably to convey the sense of circumvent [= avoid or try to avoid answering, fulfilling, or performing (duties, questions, issues, etc.)]? ...
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1answer
35 views

To draw the synthesis?

Can I draw a (or the) synthesis of something? (In a dialectical sense.) What would be alternatives if I wanted to use synthesis?
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208 views

Translating Gerunds from Spanish to English (verb+ing)

In Spanish, the gerund form (-ando, -endo) is frequently used adverbially to modify and describe the verb: El alma es dichosa dando y sirviendo. El niño anda bailando. El artista vive provocando ...
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101 views

Is there any difference in verb tense after the phrase “Isn't it about time you”

Isn't it about time you left the hospital? vs Isn't it about time you leave the hospital? or Isn't it about time you forgave yourself? vs Isn't it about time you forgive yourself?
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The equivalent to pluralising a word?

To turn "pencil" to "pencils" is to pluralise. To turn a verb into it's 'associated' (?) verb is what? Example: "Lease" to "leasing", "look" to "looking". Is there a word for this? Or are the two ...
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Which is correct: “is solved” or “has been solved”?

In a technical environment, what is the most suitable sentence to use when answering to someone about a problem that they had and we solved it for them: The problem is solved The problem has been ...
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1answer
72 views

A pest is one who pesters [duplicate]

Normally when going from a verb to a person who performs that verb, one adds er to the verb. So, if you walk you are a walker; if you deal you are a dealer, and so on. But I noticed recently that ...
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2answers
162 views

“If there were” vs. “if there was” [closed]

I saw that there were already examples on this, but I didn't find any specific enough. My problem is this sentence: If there were anything that he didn't want, it was to hurt me. I previously ...
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1answer
1k views

“Help in doing something” or “Help doing something”

Is the preposition in necessary or abundant? To be specific, which of these two sentences sounds better/is correct? This helps in achieving better fuel economy. or This helps achieving ...
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1answer
43 views

Should it be… 'The day you become Mrs' or 'The day you became Mrs'? [closed]

I am looking to get something engraved and wondered if it should read 'the day you become Mrs' or 'the day you became'. Many thanks for your help in advance!
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60 views

Is the sentence “Format complete” wrong?

As a Windows user, I see a message box with the message: "Format complete!" when I have finished to format a drive. According to the dictionary, complete is a verb or a adjective. If it is a verb, ...
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105 views

When did 'going to …' replace 'will …' in the future tense in colloquial usage

The future tense in standard written English uses 'will' as the verbal modifier, but increasingly English speakers use 'going to' as the verbal modifier. When did this come into common usage?
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Is it correct to write a noun once while listing two related (verbs) activities?

For instance, in the sentence: Without adding new items and modifying existing items. Would it be correct to completely remove the first reference to the noun items? as in: Without adding ...
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2answers
43 views

What are the meanings of the common verbs we use to mean change? [closed]

Having acknowledged that the meanings of these verbs overlap, how would describe the prototypical use of each of these verbs? Become It was becoming dark. He became a pilot. Get It was getting ...
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1answer
36 views

to depart from the project?

Would it be OK to say: "The Subcontractor departs from the certified project" (meaning, that he does not comply with the established work order, stated in the project" and takes his own direction)? Is ...
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2answers
48 views

Does “allows to + verb” imply that the corresponding event occured?

Example: Yahoo vulnerability allows hacker to delete 1.5 million records from database. Does this imply that the hacker did delete those records or just that he was in the position to delete the ...
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1answer
25 views

To be drafted in, to be drafted for or to be drafted into the army?

I'm not sure whether any of these options are valid. Which one is more common? (US or UK) Daniel is drafted in the army. Daniel is drafted for the army. Daniel is drafted into the army. ...
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1answer
79 views

Heterogeneous. Is there a verb for this word?

I am writing a scientific article in which the word heterogeneous is used frequently to indicate to the (CPU + GPU computing). However, several occasions I need to express the idea using verb like: ...
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617 views

Why is “rollback it” incorrect?

I recently wrote the following sentence: Please roll it back. But if I were to describe the action on its own I would say: This rollback was due to objections by the original author. If I ...