Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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Is verbing in “I medalled in volleyball” correct?

Is “I medalled in volleyball” a grammatically correct sentence? According to OED, medal is a verb and a noun. I haven't seen any usage of the word as a verb, but I am assuming the above sentence is ...
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If someone is electrocuted, do they have to die or can they just be injured?

Is it correct to say I electrocuted my friend if he was only injured by electricity?
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How do you conjugate Early Modern English verbs (other than present tense)?

I was wondering how one might conjugate verbs in early modern English in various tenses. I am aware of the fact that for second person and third person singular specifically, the verb endings are -est ...
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“Infer” vs. “imply” — can “infer” imply “imply”?

Okay that's a crazy title, but bear with me. Got into a good natured discussion with someone on another stack exchange site, and I was "correcting" him on the use of infer vs. imply. (The ...
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“Inputted” or “input”

I have used the word inputted in an assignment and am being forced to change it to input. However, both the Oxford English Dictionary (I am in New Zealand so this is most relevant) and MS Word list ...
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Friendlier way to express you paid for a person's drink/dinner and expect it to be paid back

In Dutch we have the word voorschieten. In English it translates — according to Google Translate — to "advance, lend, disburse". The Dutch word voorschieten is used in an informal setting between ...
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The difference between “take” and “last”

We say: "the meeting will last two hours". But we say: "how long does the flight take?" Please let me know the difference between last and take and when we should use each.
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How to spell [ʒʊʒd] and what does it mean?

I heard this strange word in American Dad over a year ago and it's been bugging me ever since. Not only do I have no idea how it's spelt, I have no idea how it could possibly be spelt. My only guesses ...
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Which form of a verb should I normally use after “what you have done is”?

Which form of a verb should I normally use after "what you have done is"? Should it be present participle (option A), past participle (option B) or a base form (option C) : A. I wanted you to clean ...
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“Be” as an action rather than a state

I’ve heard, on rare occasion, a subtle differentiation between be as a state (to passively embody) and be as an action (to actively embody). The latter form often occurs in parallel with do to add ...
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How can I change the tense of a hyphenated verb?

I'm certain this can't be the only example there is of a hyphenated verb, but it's the only one I can think of right now. How should one appropriately convert "mouse-over" into the past tense? ...
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Attempt at formulating verb tenses when time travel is involved?

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy has an amusing section on the problems associated with verb tenses when time travel is involved. It has several examples which appear to be constructed for their ...
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Hypernym for “approve” and “reject”

User A goes to the web page and clicks a menu called 'Submit Request', where User A will fill out a form request and submit it to his/her Supervisor. Then User A's Supervisor will go to the web page ...
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Is “Them’s fighting words” a right and received English expression?

I came across the phrase ‘Them’s fighting words,’ in the beginning part of a Time magazine (July 12) article in its Swampland section under the title “Don’t mess with the stimulus! It had all your ...
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What is a finite verb?

What's a finite verb? It's not just the opposite of an infinitive, is it? Can I get some examples?
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What is the opposite of postpone? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How do I say “Our meeting is preponed”? A friend of mine asked me this question a little bit again, and it caught my curiosity. Is there an explicit ...
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Why is “rollback it” incorrect?

I recently wrote the following sentence: Please roll it back. But if I were to describe the action on its own I would say: This rollback was due to objections by the original author. If I ...
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Why do we use 'up' as adverbs for verbs?

Why do we use up as adverbs for verbs? For example, 'wake up', 'throw up', etc.
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Can the verb “wish + that clause” express open possibility?

We often use "wish + that clause" to express a past/present counterfactual statement or a future unlikely event (i.e. remote possibility): I wish I hadn't quit my job. (But I quit my job.) I ...
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“I had John return the video”: why do we use “return” instead of “returns” or “returned”?

I had John return the video for me. In this sentence, why do we use return and not returns or returned?
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What does ‘Sport’ mean when you say ‘the new Apple iPad sports cameras for video conferencing’?

I found a phrase, ‘the new tablet of iPad can sport at least one camera for video conferencing’ in today’s Washington Post article reporting iPad 2. I guess ‘Sport’ here implies ‘chase (move) after ...
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Why is “I refuse running” wrong?

I got into a discussion with another user in the comments section of this question. We disagreed over the following phrases: I refuse running. I decline running. To me, they are both ...
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Why doesn't the second verb agree with the subject of that verb?

In "We watched Obama speak," what is the technical reason for it not being "We watched Obama spoke"?
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Is it always bad to use “get” or “got”?

Back in grammar, one of the many rules we were given was to always avoid "get," "got," or "gotten" due to their ambiguity and tendency toward poor grammar as in: What happened to your arm? It got ...
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Is it possible to verb anything other than a noun?

Is it possible to verb anything other than a noun? Although slightly meta, I noticed that English SE has verbing as a tag, rather than verbing-nouns.
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I sent vs I sent out

Which one is correct and why: I sent out the inquiry to the support team vs I sent the inquiry to the support team Even though the question is specific to "sent out", please verify the ...
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Is “architect” a verb and a noun?

I hear the word architect used as a verb in the technical field and now more often in other industries and groups, for example: We need to architect a better solution to the problem. I am ...
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Can the word “facing” be used both ways?

Can the word "facing" be used both ways? To write major water problems facing the world or challenges and opportunities facing low- and middle-income countries and their citizens ...
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the placement of prepositions in phrasal verbs

In England today, "put your coat on" and "put on your coat" are in free variation. But was there an original dialectal difference in the placement of the preposition, and if so, which areas said ...
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Can “casted” be the past tense of “cast”?

'The Hindu,' an Indian daily, reports: Leader of Opposition in Rajya Sabha Arun Jaitely casted his vote at Chimanbhai Patel Institute opposite Karnavati club. Does the verb cast has a form as ...
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Consistency of “There is the same number of elements in… as there are in…”

I'm proofreading this in a friend's paper: There is the same number of elements in the set of odd numbers as there are in the even numbers. The same number is singular and it's the thing being ...
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Why present perfect in “How many points have you scored this season”?

Normally we use the past simple instead of present perfect when an action happened at a specific time in the past and is not linked with the present. Why is the below sentence grammatically correct? ...
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Does the verb “Unstar” exist?

I'm creating an application for the iPhone where the user has the ability to star an item, i.e. adding a star to the item. Now I am wondering whether I can also use unstar? Or should I go with ...
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Abbreviations for nouns / noun phrases used as non-nouns

In an answer to another question, steven_desu argued that it was “technically incorrect” to use the word “e-mail” or “email” as a verb because it stands for “electronic mail.” I do not argue whether ...
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A does the same B as does C

While reading a book, I found: Objective-C supports the same conventions for specifying strings as does C. I've thought "... as C does" is correct. For example, As time goes, we come to ...
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“I would have liked 'to have seen'/'to see' New York before the cyclone” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Would you have liked to have been” vs. “would you have liked to be” Is "have" redundant when repeated in successive verb phrases? Well, let us read the following ...
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Rule forbidding use of “is” at end of sentence [closed]

Is there any justification for using “is” at the end of an English sentence, or is there a rule that forbids this?
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Expect +to VS expect + ing

I know that expect is used this way: I expect you to do that. But I have also seen examples like with verb in its "ing" form: > What to expect working at... > I will expect you doing ...
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“will” vs “would” in this sentence

I am talking about events taking place in the known future: Would it be okay if I'll confirm around 3 pm? or should it be Would it be okay if I'd confirm around 3 pm? What is the ...
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“Be not” or “is not”?

My point here is trying to explain why the message issued is not correct according to the operations allowed ahead. However, I'm in doubt about the bold part, is it grammaticaly correct or is there ...
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“Endorse” vs. “condone”

What is the difference in meaning/connotation between the two words? Is endorse "stronger", more positive? Also, endorse is to endorsement as condone is to what? Is there a noun counterpart?
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“Baby is creeping” vs. “baby is crawling” in AmE

Years and years ago, I remember reading in a book on AmE usage that the phrasal turn a baby creeps before it walks was to some extent more common to AmE than to BrE, which preferred exclusively the ...
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“I don't understand you” vs. “I'm not understanding you” [closed]

Which sentence is correct? What are you talking about? I don't understand you. What are you talking about? I'm not understanding you. That was a question we've had in an exam and it was: ...
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“provide” vs. “provide with”

I am wondering if the following sentence is correct: We add the information their study provides with to our article. The context is: their study provides with some information. And we add the ...
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About two mutually related, future actions [closed]

Is it correct to say: "I will do that thing when I will talk to him."?
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What is the opposite of “abstain”?

We were thinking originally in terms of voting, but of course "abstain" has a more general meaning, of which the antonym is probably "indulge". But is there an opposite that would be more appropriate ...
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How is the jussive mood rendered in English?

In English the imperative mood is used only for the second person (differently from Italian, where what is called imperative mood is used also for the first, and third person). How is the jussive mood ...
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How productive is the prefix “un-”?

Is it possible to use un- with new words such as sit, sleep, sad? I'm currently seeing many words (in programming) which use "un-" in the meaning of undoing something. For example, is it possible to ...
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“Hello” as a verb

A dictionary says that Hello could be a verb, noun and interjection. I'm not sure I saw it to be a verb though. Q: Could someone provide an example of 'hello' where it's used as verb. In the meaning ...
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Can the verb “wonder” simply take an object?

In this question, the questioner states I wonder the origin of the word. Can wonder take a simple object like that? Or should it be wonder about or wonder at or something similar (or something ...