Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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“that” omission, subject-verb distance [duplicate]

when can we remove 'that'? I've heard different opinions I bought the book that is required for this course I bought the book required for this course I recommend that you take my advice I recommend ...
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1answer
311 views

Is “catenate” used in IT parlance?

When I was doing my IT degree in the 80s we learned that, in programming terms, concatenation was the act of joining two strings together. Recently I was reading a technical manual and came across ...
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180 views

Why doesn't the second verb agree with the subject of that verb?

In "We watched Obama speak," what is the technical reason for it not being "We watched Obama spoke"?
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10k views

Is it always bad to use “get” or “got”?

Back in grammar, one of the many rules we were given was to always avoid "get," "got," or "gotten" due to their ambiguity and tendency toward poor grammar as in: What happened to your arm? It got ...
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3answers
836 views

Is it possible to verb anything other than a noun?

Is it possible to verb anything other than a noun? Although slightly meta, I noticed that English SE has verbing as a tag, rather than verbing-nouns.
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3answers
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I sent vs I sent out

Which one is correct and why: I sent out the inquiry to the support team vs I sent the inquiry to the support team Even though the question is specific to "sent out", please verify the ...
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5answers
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Is “architect” a verb and a noun?

I hear the word architect used as a verb in the technical field and now more often in other industries and groups, for example: We need to architect a better solution to the problem. I am ...
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4answers
288 views

Can the word “facing” be used both ways?

Can the word "facing" be used both ways? To write major water problems facing the world or challenges and opportunities facing low- and middle-income countries and their citizens ...
3
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1answer
260 views

the placement of prepositions in phrasal verbs

In England today, "put your coat on" and "put on your coat" are in free variation. But was there an original dialectal difference in the placement of the preposition, and if so, which areas said ...
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2answers
296 views

Why is “I refuse running” wrong?

I got into a discussion with another user in the comments section of this question. We disagreed over the following phrases: I refuse running. I decline running. To me, they are both ...
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3answers
31k views

Can “casted” be the past tense of “cast”?

'The Hindu,' an Indian daily, reports: Leader of Opposition in Rajya Sabha Arun Jaitely casted his vote at Chimanbhai Patel Institute opposite Karnavati club. Does the verb cast has a form as ...
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1answer
3k views

Is there a difference in meaning between “does not seem to” and “seems not to”?

Consider the following sentences: Try not to be alarmed if a rule doesn’t seem to work for a specific sentence. Try not to be alarmed if a rule seems not to work for a specific sentence. ...
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4answers
721 views

Consistency of “There is the same number of elements in… as there are in…”

I'm proofreading this in a friend's paper: There is the same number of elements in the set of odd numbers as there are in the even numbers. The same number is singular and it's the thing being ...
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3answers
552 views

Why present perfect in “How many points have you scored this season”?

Normally we use the past simple instead of present perfect when an action happened at a specific time in the past and is not linked with the present. Why is the below sentence grammatically correct? ...
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5answers
777 views

Does the verb “Unstar” exist?

I'm creating an application for the iPhone where the user has the ability to star an item, i.e. adding a star to the item. Now I am wondering whether I can also use unstar? Or should I go with ...
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4answers
1k views

Abbreviations for nouns / noun phrases used as non-nouns

In an answer to another question, steven_desu argued that it was “technically incorrect” to use the word “e-mail” or “email” as a verb because it stands for “electronic mail.” I do not argue whether ...
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4answers
280 views

A does the same B as does C

While reading a book, I found: Objective-C supports the same conventions for specifying strings as does C. I've thought "... as C does" is correct. For example, As time goes, we come to ...
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5answers
3k views

“I would have liked 'to have seen'/'to see' New York before the cyclone” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Would you have liked to have been” vs. “would you have liked to be” Is "have" redundant when repeated in successive verb phrases? Well, let us read the following ...
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2answers
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Expect +to VS expect + ing

I know that expect is used this way: I expect you to do that. But I have also seen examples like with verb in its "ing" form: > What to expect working at... > I will expect you doing ...
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3answers
8k views

“will” vs “would” in this sentence

I am talking about events taking place in the known future: Would it be okay if I'll confirm around 3 pm? or should it be Would it be okay if I'd confirm around 3 pm? What is the ...
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3answers
99 views

“Be not” or “is not”?

My point here is trying to explain why the message issued is not correct according to the operations allowed ahead. However, I'm in doubt about the bold part, is it grammaticaly correct or is there ...
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3answers
1k views

“Endorse” vs. “condone”

What is the difference in meaning/connotation between the two words? Is endorse "stronger", more positive? Also, endorse is to endorsement as condone is to what? Is there a noun counterpart?
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2answers
847 views

“Is” vs. “Are” when using the word “Pair” in a mathematical setting

I've seen equally good arguments for and against using "is" for this sentence. The pair of polynomials (f,g) is/are related by the reciprocity law. Which verb is used correctly?
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1answer
150 views

About two mutually related, future actions [closed]

Is it correct to say: "I will do that thing when I will talk to him."?
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What is the opposite of “abstain”?

We were thinking originally in terms of voting, but of course "abstain" has a more general meaning, of which the antonym is probably "indulge". But is there an opposite that would be more appropriate ...
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4answers
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How is the jussive mood rendered in English?

In English the imperative mood is used only for the second person (differently from Italian, where what is called imperative mood is used also for the first, and third person). How is the jussive mood ...
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4answers
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How productive is the prefix “un-”?

Is it possible to use un- with new words such as sit, sleep, sad? I'm currently seeing many words (in programming) which use "un-" in the meaning of undoing something. For example, is it possible to ...
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5answers
951 views

“Hello” as a verb

A dictionary says that Hello could be a verb, noun and interjection. I'm not sure I saw it to be a verb though. Q: Could someone provide an example of 'hello' where it's used as verb. In the meaning ...
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566 views

Can the verb “wonder” simply take an object?

In this question, the questioner states I wonder the origin of the word. Can wonder take a simple object like that? Or should it be wonder about or wonder at or something similar (or something ...
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2answers
1k views

{wend, went, went} changed into {go, went, gone}

I have heard that the verb go used to be wend in olden days. I am curious if there is any historical or other explanation why the past form of wend, i.e. went, is still in use while the simple present ...
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4answers
343 views

Hire an employee (a consultant)?

I am trying to fill in this sentence: “My company is looking to ___ a consultant”. Is the correct term “hire” or is there a different word that is more fitting when talking about a consultant?
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2answers
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Attempt at formulating verb tenses when time travel is involved?

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy has an amusing section on the problems associated with verb tenses when time travel is involved. It has several examples which appear to be constructed for their ...
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3answers
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When would one use “burnt” and when would “burned” be more appropriate?

More out of curiosity than anything, when would one use "burnt" and when would "burned" be appropriate? For example, This coffee tastes burnt. This coffee tastes burned. or They burnt ...
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2answers
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“Have a look” vs. “Take a look”

What is the difference between Have a look and Take a look (meaning/connotations)? For example: Have a look at the question. Take a look at the question. For some reason I only found first ...
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5answers
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Which one is correct? “Explain me” or “Explain to me”?

Which of the following expressions is correct? -Explain me. -Explain to me. I know "Explain it to me" is correct, but I want to know which one of the above is valid.
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6answers
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Is this correct: “I'd have to have had…”

This sentence makes my head hurt a bit, and it doesn't seem right, but perhaps you guys could help me sort it out. "If I would've gone to Canada, I'd have to have had some kind of winter gear."
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3answers
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Reflexive love: where does “love me some …” come from?

It seems trendy to use a reflexive-like construction with love or hate plus some, like this: You know I love me some cheese! I hate me some cold and the temperature is dropping. Where did this ...
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6answers
13k views

'Expired' or 'Passed away'?

When someone dies, do we say they expired or passed away? Does the word expired give any more respect when used? Or less respect than passed away?
7
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7answers
246 views

Is there a concise word or phrase for the action you perform on an option to remove the others?

Say someone is holding a number of items in front of you. What would you call the action you request that they perform to remove all choices but one so that you can examine the item that is left? It ...
7
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2answers
469 views

“I need it to lift 2 tons this time.” “I don't know if it *could* do.” Why do some people use “do” like this?

Sometimes, instead of saying "could/can" or "would/will" (the two most common I've heard), some people say "could/can do" or "would/will do". Instead of: I don't know if it can. I sometimes ...
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2answers
371 views

Can “shrugging” only be done with shoulders?

Please compare He shrugged. and He shrugged his shoulders. Is there anything else that can be shrugged, besides shoulders? To me it sounds like duplication when used in this way. I'm aware ...
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5answers
832 views

Is there a passive for the sentence “Be quiet.”?

How to say "Be quiet.", which is a command, in passive voice?
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1answer
241 views

Are there other verbs like “be” and “go”?

The verbs be and go have the nice peculiarity that their various forms (be/was and go/went) come from originally distinct verbs. Are there other such verbs?
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5answers
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What is the past tense of “sync”?

I've always believed the past tense of sync ("I sync my phone with my computer") to be synced ("I synced my phone with my computer yesterday"). This question would seem to suggest either synced or ...
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6answers
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“When Adam delved and Eve span, who was then the gentleman?”

What do delve and span mean in this quotation from John Ball's sermon addressing the rebels of the Peasant's Revolt? When Adam delved and Eve span, Who was then the gentleman? It doesn't seem ...
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5answers
2k views

Why put the verb before the subject?

The opening sentence to The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien reads, In a hole in the ground there lived [verb] a hobbit [subject]. I wonder if there are accepted stylistic purposes for such a structure. ...
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2answers
350 views

How can you make “to be” explicit and simple in this future conditional sentence?

I can say "Jerry's been a bad pussycat this morning" or "Hey, Jerry, you be a good pussycat now" or "Jerry's been active all morning so he's being a good pussycat now". All these involve the use of ...
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171 views

Meaning of “to scratch”

Can the verb to scratch mean "start from the beginning"? Can I say "I scratched" to say "I started from the beginning"?
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695 views

What is the reciprocal verb of “to thank”?

I know that to express gratitude or to thank are verbs that basically mean to say thank you, but what is the verb for the reciprocol action (i.e. saying you're welcome)? Is there a word for this, and ...
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1answer
200 views

Where does the verb go on this question? Is it even a reported question?

I understand that when I report a question, I put the subject back in front of the verb, as in: "He asked if she was going to be late." But I always get puzzled when it comes to reporting a question ...