Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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“Conductive to achieving” or “Conductive to achieve”?

So there is the sentence: "The current environment is not conducive to achieving the best results" The usage of "to verb+ing" is very confusing. What is the difference between "to achieving" and "to ...
2
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1answer
72 views

Is it possible to “revenge” a situation?

From the usage I am familiar with, it sounds strange to use "revenge" as a verb by itself. I am used to hearing it together with another word, such as "get revenge" or "take revenge". My dictionary ...
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4answers
171 views

What verb would you use to describe the sound tires make when they roll on the asphalt?

In a previous question, I mentioned an English teacher who changed the following sentence “…the rustling of tires." to “…the rustle of tires.” It seems; however, that rustle has been assessed and ...
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3answers
97 views

How do I say that I went down and came back up the water while drowning?

When a person is drowning and he is fighting for his life, he goes down and comes back up to catch some breath with difficulty, until his energy goes to zero or gives up. How do you describe that ...
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3answers
364 views

Use of the word “emit”

I came across this article http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/scientists-discovers-light-emiting-mysterious-alien-planet-338945. The web link uses "emitting" in an attributive manner which we have all seen ...
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2answers
108 views

In the sentence below, is the verb 'render' used correctly?

Consider the sentence: What matters is to render the idea from the field of theory into practice. Could the verb render be replaced by the verb translate without changing the meaning? Which is ...
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2answers
57 views

relative pronouns and subject and verb agreement

My cousin is one of those people who (love, Loves) to eat pizza. According to the rules of grammar the relative pronoun who refers to the plural noun people. Therefore, the correct verb choice is ...
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2answers
84 views

“To be prepared” - Verb tense question

In the sentence below, is the word "prepared" used correctly? I my opinion, it was incorrect, since the sentence is a general statement, therefore the verb "prepare" hasn't been been performed so ...
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52 views

Verb groups and phrasal verbs

Here's a quick one: In the (potential) verb phrase 'had competed for [gaining control]' (I know it's not very elegant) is 'competed for' a phrasal verb or does 'for' begin a prepositional group with ...
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2answers
69 views

APA: Paper in past tense but is/was verb confusion for alive author

I want to state, "One advocate for the issues based teaching style is/was Brian Schultz." He is alive, but my paper is in past tense. What do I do?
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1answer
107 views

Is there a verb for unintentionally showing your rear end?

I’m trying to be civil here. But two friends were sitting on the ground at the park, and their rear ends were very visible to everyone, so I wanted a verb similar to mooning, but mooning sounds ...
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1answer
59 views

I was reading “cambridge IELTS” books and I had a problem in the meaning of a sentence [closed]

I was reading "cambridge IELTS" books and I had a problem in the meaning of a sentence. the sentence is : (I may have to call somebody out) what does "may have to call" mean?
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1answer
47 views

Deadlines as instants or periods with various verbs and tenses

I was wondering whether a deadline is more of an instant or more of a period. It seems to have some of both aspects, but with more of an emphasis on the instant. I thought that this should be ...
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2answers
34 views

Using gerund while listing actions in the past

I'm writing a piece of fiction as training to improve my English skills, and I've written this small piece: The boys had been bulling her again, hiding her things and dumping her backback in a ...
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1answer
67 views

How to express actions in sentences

When Steve walks in, everyone will stare. Does the first part of sentence represent present or future? And is the mixing of verbs in the sentence correct? When steve walks into the room, ...
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1answer
45 views

Can you use “stub out” as a verb regarding code development?

I know that in code development people talk about "stubs," which are bits of dummy code. In plumbing, "stub-outs" are blind ends of plumbing waiting for fixtures to be installed later. Can you verb ...
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2answers
50 views

In “laugh your head off”, Is “laugh” an intransitive verb?

I am a little confused with a transitive and intransitive verb form. Can someone help me with this, please?
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1answer
26 views

Is vs. Are - Need help with use of this in a question [closed]

What should I use for the following sentence: How old is Nancy's grandparents? or How old are Nancy's grandparents?
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128 views

how to use reporting verbs with 'that' clauses [closed]

_____describe _____discuss _____assert _____contend _____state _____present _____note _____allege _____explain _____maintain _____claim _____imply ...
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1answer
37 views

Subsume - usage

Can you use 'subsume' as an verb of replacement? For example: Medea subsumes her pain into others' suffering.
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110 views

Word for a short exhalation, antonym of “gasp”?

When you're disappointed or upset and rather than say anything you make a short exhalation, how's that called? It's sort of as if you said 'huh' while looking at the floor standing next to the person ...
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0answers
11 views

Position about verb and adverbs in sentence [duplicate]

I have these two lines: You have already paid your bills. You already have paid your bills. Both sentence are pointing to same meaning, but I want to know which is correct or the best ...
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2answers
45 views

tense of verbs in the following phrase [closed]

Please help me with the correct form (tense) of verbs in the following phrase: Some ideas had been previously suggested, but because something else is happening, no idea proved good enough. The ...
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4answers
860 views

Is “disconfirm” a word?

I see that disconfirm is not in the dictionary but I was wondering if concatenating the prefix dis- to a proper verb can be used to properly denote a meaning opposite from that verb. E.g. in The Big ...
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12answers
5k views

One word for “bringing someone up to speed”

I'm trying to explain the following thought: She has been tremendously helpful in training new employees in the company... only instead of "training", I would like to use a word that emphasizes ...
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1answer
29 views

When to use plural verb or not [duplicate]

The best part of me is my hands. or The best part of me are my hands.
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1answer
70 views

Is “capabalize” a correct verb?

I've just came up with a verb "capabalize" as a synonym for enable. It's main intention is to capabalize / enable the system for... Is it correct? I could not find it in several dictionaries.
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4answers
54 views

What is the best verb expressing the action of searching and working with a software for understanding how to work?

I am looking for the exact verb for the action of searching in and working with a software in order to understand how it works.
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1answer
48 views

Sentence with Relative Pronoun + Verb Be

These deposits were believed to be residue of liquid water breaking out of cliffs and crater walls, carrying sediment downhill through the gullies, and later evaporating. This sentence is the ...
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1answer
56 views

“can give” or “could give” as second verb in a past sentence [closed]

I have the following 2 sentences: "what Pablo said can give you a hint" "what Pablo said could give you a hint" Are they both correct? if no, which one and why? Thank you very much
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2answers
391 views

Is there a common ancestor for “wink” and “twinkle”?

Etymonline traces wink to Old English wincian, with Old High German cognate winkan "move sideways, stagger, nod". By the same souce, twinkle comes from OE twinclian "twinkle, wink", with MHG cognate ...
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3answers
71 views

“Provide” in software development terms

I often uses the verb provide for describing interfaces between components. For example: The interface IMath provides the common math functions for (...). I don't want to use the same verb ...
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37 views

Can you maintain a consideration?

More than 1 person has stumbled on this line in a draft report here: "...such that the considerations outlined in Section 1.2 are maintained" Can you maintain a consideration? Yes, the ...
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1answer
37 views

What should I choose: “it is” or “these are”

I am writing an article and I am not sure what to choose "it is" or "these are" in the following sentence: LIMS - it's dedicated hardware and software systems, aimed at the automation of the ...
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1answer
144 views

What is the meaning of the word “matches”? [closed]

I am studying regular expressions. A regular expression is a pattern that you can match in a text. In books, I often read things like the period . matches any single character. What is the ...
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32 views

“Listen to me play the flute” vs “listen to me playing the flute” [duplicate]

I see this expression "He listens to me play the flute". Is it correct ? And what about ""He listens to me playing the flute". What is the current form of this expression. I didn't find the answer ...
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2answers
174 views

Is it correct to say “Let's go to see your grandma”?

My 7-year-old daughter's English textbook has the following conversation: Son: What day is today? Mother: It's Saturday. Let's go to see your grandma. Is "go to see" here correct? Should it be ...
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1answer
88 views

Usage of “imperative to [verb]ing”

From what I learned, we could use imperative to [verb]ing, but when I read my book, I see this sentence: An accurate analysis of surveys is imperative to building a good understanding of customer ...
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1answer
36 views

Position of direct object of phrasal verb (bring up)

Is it grammatically correct if I say: His mother brought that little matter of his prison record up again. Or should I better say: His mother brought that little matter up of his prison ...
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1answer
58 views

Confusion over “does” and “do” [closed]

I saw this quote: What kind of education does your professors have? but this sounds incorrect, and I have confusion as to whether the correct usage is: What kind of education do your college ...
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3answers
182 views

Verb form for Didactic

What are possible verb forms or more proper forms for the word didactic? I know that didact is only a noun, although audiologically it sounds as though it could be a verb. The sentence I am trying to ...
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79 views

“I wouldn't have <past particle verb> if you wouldn't have <past participle verb>” not commonly heard from natives, why? Wrong or uncommon?

In my native language we often use complex sentences expressions like this: "I wouldn't have gone there if you wouldn't have told me to go there". Now when I say that in English it feel a bit verbose ...
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2answers
53 views

Contextual Meaning of word Forbear

I just started reading the book "H is for Hawk". The first page has a review that says: This beautiful book is at once heartfelt and clever in the way it mixes elegy with celebration: elegy of a ...
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1answer
46 views

Term for making a synonym?

When you give the definition of a word, you define it, but what(if there is) is the word for giving a synonym of a word?
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1answer
286 views

Interview, taking, giving, being interviewed

So what is correct to use in the context of the interview? (If one is an interviewee) I am taking an interview. I am giving an interview. I am being interviewed. (If one is an interviewer) I am ...
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1answer
92 views

What is the function of the word “that” here? (And is “absent” a verb in this sentence?) [closed]

What is the grammatical function of "that" in the following sentence. I'm having a hard time explaining to students why a verb (absent) is preceded by "that." Students assume a noun should follow ...
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1answer
107 views

Verb Tense question:

I'm writing in the past tense, but this sentence needs to be in past perfect. Is this correct? "When they had the chance, they had fought their way out." Or should it be: "When they'd had the ...
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3answers
194 views

Overt verb meaning “to look at affectionately”

What is a verb meaning "to look at affectionately" in a way that is distinctly visible in the subject's facial expression? For example in Alice beams at Bob. the action is visually and ...
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1answer
605 views

I need a verb for curiosity [duplicate]

Please consider this scenario and help me find a verb that can be used here. I am curious. I ask a question. The question is answered. My curiosity is...?
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48 views

How to avoid redundancy here?

When I finally caught him, he was bleeding and was too weak to swim. The sentence seems awkward to me and I don't know how to rephrase it. I think "was" is kinda redundant but just omitting it ...