Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
2answers
209 views

use of the verb “make” [closed]

The following is part of a blog post in The Huffington Post: In the perfect world we would all be morning people. We would wake up calm, refreshed and ready to tackle the day. But this isn’t a ...
3
votes
0answers
35 views

How does “to subsist in” come to mean “to be attributed to”? [closed]

What's the logical derivation behind this definition of subsist [Definition 2.1] Be attributable to: the effect of genetic maldevelopment may subsist in chromosomal mutation In that link, the ...
0
votes
1answer
95 views

In “can hear singing”, is “singing” a verb or a gerund?

In this sentence is singing a verb or a gerund? Look at the children whom you can hear singing.
1
vote
1answer
36 views

arrogate vs arrogate to

Can the verb arrogate stand alone? http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/arrogate only publicises arrogate + to. For example, would it be right to omit to in the following by ...
-1
votes
1answer
79 views

What does “take out your book” mean? [closed]

What does this phrase mean? "take out your book" Because I have found no relevant meaning of take+out as a phrasal verb in the online dictionaries. Can any one help me?
1
vote
1answer
39 views

intermix vs mix

What are the differences? Are they everywhere interchangeable? Isn't intermix redundant, because if you mix A and B, then you must be mixing them together? For example, can mix be used in: Law and ...
0
votes
2answers
101 views

Will marry vs will get married [duplicate]

I have seen both sentences below: I will get married. I will marry. So what is the difference? Which one is recommended? Is there any difference in meaning or just grammar?
0
votes
1answer
56 views

“vest” as a phrasal verb

Rather than memorising the definitions, how could I intuit and rationalise them: vest in somebody/something = to belong to somebody/something legally. vest something in somebody = to give somebody ...
2
votes
3answers
76 views

Placing the object of an infinitive before it instead of after it

At the beginning of 1807, based on information gathered from Burr’s correspondence allegedly showing that he had begun preparations for a large-scale military expedition, the former vice ...
4
votes
2answers
182 views

Is “nothing but birds and a few insects” singular or plural?

Nothing but birds and a few insects [was/were] to be seen. In the above sentence, should the verb agree with "nothing" or with "birds and a few insects"?
1
vote
2answers
55 views

Can “succeed” be used as an imperative?

In a golf video game I'm working on: "Succeed a putt from 50 feet." This use of "succeed" bothers me whenever I see it, but I can't formalize why I think it's wrong.
0
votes
1answer
113 views

Notice vs. pay attention

I want to ask you, the English native speakers, regarding to a post in my blog which was commented by a visitor: Before applying for a job, please notice the following requirements: write down ...
-1
votes
1answer
124 views

Why does impugn = oppugn?

Their definitions look the same—impugn vs. oppugn—yet they have different prefixes. Why don't they have opposite meanings? Would someone please explain this discrepancy?
2
votes
2answers
62 views

Which of these is correct? — question involving helping verbs (I think)

I have no idea how to explain why I generally think well, without having my explanation seem contrived I have no idea how to explain why I generally think well, without my explanation seeming ...
1
vote
3answers
65 views

Intuition - "transfix' = to pierce?

I brook the etymology for 'transfix' = 'to pierce', thanks to http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=transfix&allowed_in_frame=0. Yet how does this imply or induce the figurative meaning of ...
1
vote
0answers
56 views

“issue” as an intransitive verb [closed]

The place of confinement would not be different, since in those days the dangerously insane in the District of Columbia were confined in the same jail as indicted criminals. (There was no ...
-1
votes
1answer
58 views

How to enumerate activities I did

I'm writing a CV and in one section I'd like to enumerate the activities I did. Should I write I proved ... I participated ... I mentored ... ... or Proved ... Participated ... Mentored ... ... ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

He admitted that it took… Or, He admitted having it

Consider the following example: A man wrote a book in 2 days. He admits it. Should I say: "He admitted that it took him 2 days to write the book" "He admitted that it had taken him 2 days to write ...
3
votes
2answers
171 views

Is there a passive form of “to masturbate”?

First of all, I hope this question does not get banned due to inappropriate content. It that is the case, I’d be glad to know how I can reformulate the question in order to stay within the rules. ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Get or fetch when the object might not be there? [duplicate]

Upon doing some research I stumbled upon this answer: (...) Fetch means that you are going to get something, and bring it back. Get doesn't necessarily mean that you are bringing it ...
0
votes
1answer
89 views

Direct and indirect object with the verb “kick” [closed]

Are both theses sentences correct and commonly used: "Kick the ball to me." "Kick me the ball."?
0
votes
2answers
37 views

Can “look” be transitive in the meaning “look at”?

For example: He examined the body indifferently, much like one would look a dead animal on a roadside. I would like to know if to look can be employed transitively like this. I'm sure I've read ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

"be enacted' = to take place

Why is the passive, and not the active (= "to enact"), the equivalent of "to take place"? What's the intuition?
3
votes
3answers
241 views

Use of plural with “respectively” when referring to a property

If you are referring to one property but are giving the respective values for two different things do you use the singular or plural form? Can the property be treated as a mass noun so that it takes ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

Verb for “to make something show its characteristics” [closed]

Using a real dataset with a limited variety of characteristics might fail to _____ the true performance of the algorithms. I need a verb with the meaning "to make something show its ...
27
votes
12answers
3k views

What's the word for paper “decaying”?

Imagine an old map, a map with a path to a treasure, like the ones you remember from cartoons. The map's partially destroyed, because it's so old, and it has been exposed to air, and heat, and water, ...
1
vote
4answers
108 views

A single verb that means two entities mutually supplement one another

I'm about to take a degree in Linguistics and Japanese. I want to explain my thought that linguistics supplements Japanese, and Japanese supplements linguistics. Is there a single verb that implies ...
3
votes
2answers
324 views

“Explain the reason why”

Is it natural to say "he explained the reason why he was late"? I suspect that it doesn't make sense. But I reckon "That is the reason why he's sick" is acceptable with "the reason". Could it be ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

“to pine away from”

Definition 1.1 states: Suffer a mental and physical decline, especially because of a broken heart Yet what does "pine away from" mean? Does it equal "to pine from" = to suffer from? Is the ...
0
votes
2answers
527 views

Is it “restricted to” or “restricted from”? [closed]

I came across this sentence: The power to rule was restricted to ministers, and it was restricted from king. What is the difference between "restricted to" and "restricted from" here?
4
votes
3answers
378 views

A formal word for 'disemvowel'

According to Collins English Dictionary, disemvowel is a transitive verb meaning 'to remove the vowels from (a word in a text message, email, etc.) in order to abbreviate it'. Since the ...
6
votes
1answer
115 views

Grammar rules for parellelism in comparisons and variations according to verb placement

I'm an academic editor in the field of medicine and I often come across complex comparisons. My question is specifically regarding how the placement of the verb affects the the parallelism of the ...
3
votes
1answer
300 views

Why the “give” in “I don't give a flying f***”?

I’m not a native speaker. I know that I don't give a flying fuck means "I don’t care", but how did it come to mean that? Specifically, why does the verb give mean "don’t care" here?
2
votes
1answer
56 views

Intuition - “to enjoin”

Would someone please explain the etymology or the intuition behind this verb? I'm aware of the etymological fallacy, but still want to intuit its definition.
1
vote
1answer
73 views

There is vs There are [duplicate]

I'm aware of (multitudinous) related, similar questions concerning this, but I still feel tentative for the following example. I also referenced ...
0
votes
2answers
84 views

“to enquire of”

I referenced Prepositions used with "inquire", yet I'm still strained about the verb plus the preposition "to enquire of"". I can't pinpoint why, though. When is it legitimate to omit "of" ...
1
vote
2answers
47 views

“Fill in” or “enter” the text fields

In the documentation file I am working on right now, I have to inform user about filling some optional and mandatory text fields. Which verb better describes the "putting some text in the field" - ...
2
votes
1answer
102 views

What does “reputation-bibbing” mean?

I read this sentence: "In all his writing (and, apparently, conversation) [Roy] Jenkins loved reputation-bibbing, loved all kinds of ranking, especially of politicians." What does ...
1
vote
1answer
87 views

“I let him do it” and “I allow him to do it”, why exactly does one require 'to'?

I let him do it. and I allow him to do it. Why does the latter require to? What are the "rules" of using to with an infinitive? When is it necessary?
0
votes
2answers
43 views

Usage of the word “coordinated” in a professional report

Which is a more apt way of using the word coordinated in the given context: I thank Mr. XYZ, who coordinated with me on the project. OR I thank Mr. XYZ, with whom I coordinated on the project. ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Open vs Open Itself

Recently I read sentence like '... section opens with {{^section}} ...' Here, I guess the verb open does not require ITSELF (just open instead of open itself). Is it some group of verbs OPEN ...
2
votes
2answers
54 views

Difference between “hop the rocks quickly” and “quickly hop the rocks”

I'm trying to decide which sentence is correct, or if they both are. which would you recommend as easier to read/understand for the average reader? Hop the rocks quickly and get the star. ...
1
vote
3answers
86 views

Should we repeat the verb after “rather than”?

Super AMOLED Plus uses a traditional RGB RGB (3 subpixels) arrangement typically used in LCD displays rather than the PenTile RGBG pixel matrix (2 subpixels) used in Super AMOLED. or Super ...
-3
votes
0answers
25 views

Which of the two is correct usage? [duplicate]

What did they have for lunch? or What did they had for lunch?
1
vote
2answers
30 views

Is this usage correct?

Is this usage correct according to these examples? I need to get this room left by students. is the above correct and if so does it mean the same as I need to cause this room to be left by students or ...
1
vote
3answers
131 views

Earthquake As A Verb

Is there a way to use earthquake as a verb, i.e.: It started earthquaking... What's the proper way to express earthquake as a verb?
5
votes
3answers
205 views

What did “make love” mean in the 1920s?

This 1921 article gives "Ten Pointers for Domestic Happiness". Pointer V reads: Make love to your wife; continue to be her sweetheart. Neglect begets indifference that is fatal to married life. ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

“Sleep through a single night” vs. “sleep a single night”

For the next two weeks he did not sleep through a single night. Can we recast the sentence as follows? For the next two weeks he did not sleep a single night. That is, is the use of through ...
3
votes
4answers
332 views

Is there a single-word verb meaning “to perform cunnilingus on”?

The single word for to perform fellatio on is the verb fellate. Is there an analogous word for cunnilingus?
4
votes
7answers
425 views

Is there a word/term for “verbs which indicate the underlying sentiment of a statement”?

Sorry, I'm not sure the best way to describe this, but hopefully you understand what I mean. Something like the result of the verb(to say) and any adverb(insultingly) = verb(to insult). Another way ...