Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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Is “use” a negative word in the following sentence?

I heard somebody say: I used my mother to find my socks. The moment I heard it, my first impression was that it meant something bad — a rather negative word choice. Then I looked up use ...
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1answer
38 views

“Facility for speaking” vs. “facility to speak”

Which one would you use: I lost my facility to speak. I lost my facility for speaking. Or does either work?
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4answers
324 views

How is justice served?

Serve is a ditransitive verb: “I served him; I served him dinner.” Dinner is served when it is delivered; and a person is served when food is placed in front of him. In which sense is justice served ...
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2answers
97 views

Why the word building is used insead of using built?

We used to say the word as building. Generally, we use the gerund form in the present continuous tense. Why are we using the word building when it is already built?
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1answer
76 views

Which tense should use? Present Perfect or Past?

Which of the following sentence is correct? "I have talked with him today. He wants to do the work" or "I talked with him today. He wants to do the work." Which tense I need to use at the sentence? ...
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2answers
41 views

“Better have it get fired at someone” - get fired?

I know "get" has so many meanings but I just do cannot figure out the right one here: If you establish a gun in Act 1, you better have it get fired at somebody by Act 3. Would it not work ...
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2answers
40 views

'engaged in developing' or 'engaged in the development of'?

XXX is engaged in developing and commercializing therapies for the treatment of Alzheimer's patients. or XXX is engaged in the development and commercialization of therapies for the ...
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2answers
66 views

Is “Implement Improvement” awkward English?

Do native English speakers use implement with improvement directly? I found that to implement means 'to carry out (something concrete).' Is implement improvement awkward English?
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2answers
87 views

Reserve or book tickets?

In an app I am writing the user can book/reserve tickets for riding a bus. Which of the following terms does fit this process best? 'Reserve Tickets' or 'Book Tickets' Also, in some cases the user ...
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4answers
458 views

A verb meaning to have something pointed “inserted” on one's leg?

Example: The bird [...] its beak on my arm. I thought about stab but I think it sounds weird applied to a bird's beak. What other verb can I use?
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6answers
112 views

Verb similar to “synchronize” but not for time

I am looking for a word that describes adjusting status to conform another. Let us say the status of the account is active but in our system shows inactive. Synchronize describes the situation with ...
2
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1answer
58 views

Which Verb to Use Depending on the Context?

I want some clarification on the verbs tell, say and speak because they mean the same action to me. For example, you can use both of these sentences. He said "I am not attending the party." ...
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3answers
48 views

About verbs and their objects [closed]

Some verbs take their object directly, some don't. For example: you bounce into a programmer's cubicle with a huge grin on your face the word "bounce" here cannot have its object, so we have to ...
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1answer
55 views

Matching verb tenses when starting a sentence with “this”

The phrase in question is "This allows his arms to naturally accelerate through the bottom of his swing and unleashes a lot of power on the ball." My question is about the proper tense of the verb, ...
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2answers
116 views

Back flap of an envelope

I am wiring a letter for a company and it said it should be signed at the back flap. Can anyone tell me what the back flap of an envelope is?
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3answers
68 views

Phrasing of “this=that” sentence?

What is the best way to phrase and punctuate this type of "this = that" sentence? No noise was detected, indicating that the room was empty. No noise was detected, which indicated that the room was ...
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1answer
57 views

Meaning of “bobbed” in “hair bobbed from a ray of sunlight” [closed]

From The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford: Ed Miller: I was with a girl once. Wasn't a squaw, but she was purty. She had yellow hair, like uh... oh, like something. Dick ...
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1answer
98 views

Looking forward to “ see” or “seeing”?

Which of the 2 sentences is correct? Sam is looking forward to see the Rocky mountains. Sam is looking forward to seeing the Rocky mountains.
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1answer
117 views

What verb form is contained in 'books are written by authors'?

If I say 'fiction is written by those with a creative flair'; and 'Oliver Twist is written by Dickens', what part of speech is the word 'written' in each of these? I recognise that it may not be the ...
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2answers
375 views

“click on the image” vs. “click the image” [duplicate]

Transitive verbs take object directly. Source - http://grammar.about.com/od/tz/g/tranverb02term.htm If "click" is a transitive verb, why do we say "click on the image" and not "click the image"?
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0answers
16 views

the same A as Verb + Subject [duplicate]

While reading a book, I found: Objective-C supports the same conventions as does C. I've thought "... as C does" is correct. For example, As time goes by, we come to forget almost ...
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1answer
54 views

Is “divine” acceptable as a verb? [closed]

Most definitions I find refer to the noun or adjective "divine" as "of or like God" or "very pleasing; delightful" but these definitions do not list the word as a verb. I can find a definition for ...
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2answers
130 views

Verbs with Inanimate Subjects

Is it appropriate to use phrases such as the following in technical prose? The road runs south. The river turns to the west. While I understand that literary texts often use such constructions, ...
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4answers
125 views

Verbs that change meaning depending on object position

I was writing a text and I stumbled upon the differences between: Lily slipped and threw up her keys Lily slipped and threw her keys up [in the air] For a moment I was finding phrase 1 more ...
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0answers
98 views

More on charting tenses [closed]

I saw an interesting post on here that shows tenses in a chart. I use an even more schematic chart to explain active tenses to foreign students. Given that you are all linguists I'd like to know ...
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4answers
279 views

A does the same B as does C

While reading a book, I found: Objective-C supports the same conventions for specifying strings as does C. I've thought "... as C does" is correct. For example, As time goes, we come to ...
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3answers
68 views

Is “Lady Macbeth has plotted this out carefully and diligently” a correct use of “plot”?

Lady Macbeth has plotted this out carefully and diligently. Can I use the word "plot" in such a way? I know most people would want to replace that with "planned", but I don't want to keep using ...
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4answers
82 views

“Franchise” as a verb

I'd like to know what franchise meas as a verb in the following sentence: Catering in this school has been franchised to the company. The native speakers I consulted, both American, don't seem ...
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2answers
127 views

Nominalization of the phrase “the way they are normally represented”

In a past exam on technical writing, we were required to rewrite the italicized part of the following clause using nominalization, that is, turning verb phrases to noun phrases: "[...] this ...
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1answer
190 views

Why not “skydove”?

In having a conversation with some friends, I noted that I decided at one point to forgo an option that I had at hand. Since I was speaking in the past, I had to put it in the correct tense. I knew ...
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2answers
174 views

One of the underlined words is wrong. Choose either A, B, C or D [closed]

"What (are:A) you talking (about:B)? (I'm:C) not (understand:D) you." At first, I thought C, so the sentence would be "What are you talking about? I don't understand you." And I chose C because I ...
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3answers
193 views

Doesn't “Thanks very much.” sound weird? [closed]

Cambridge's English Vocabulary in Use, Pre-Intermediate and Intermediate, gives, as a common way of thanking people, “Thanks (very much).” (third edition, unit 64, page 134, heading C: Thanks and ...
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2answers
264 views

“Following a suggestion” vs. “taking a suggestion”

I am going to be following your suggestion. I am going to be taking your suggestion. Do they mean the same thing? If not, what is the difference between them? If they do mean the same thing, ...
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5answers
223 views

An entire Novel without verbs? [closed]

I thought there has to be a verb in every sentence, but apparently there exists an entire novel with no verbs! How is that possible? Am talking about The Train from Nowhere by Michel Dansel. The ...
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3answers
114 views

Is the verb 'inquire' bitransitive?

People say the verb inquire can be bitransitive (i.e., ditransitive) and also monotransitive. I can find many examples of its monotransitive use, but none about bitransitive. Could you show me how ...
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2answers
251 views

“Given that” vs. “Granted that”

Understanding that "given that" and "granted that" are both used to mark the premise of an argument (or conditions that are assumed to be true), and the actual meaning is almost identical, I have to ...
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1answer
103 views

I have no/I don't have any [duplicate]

What am I supposed to say if I want to say that I don't possess ssomething? here are some sentences I have trouble with: 1-I have nobody or I don't have anybody? 2-There isn't any sugar or there's ...
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3answers
131 views

“Went and got” — is it grammatically correct?

Trying to find out if phrases like "went and got" are correct, e.g.: She went and got the book.
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1answer
50 views

Answering or calling in response to a job posting?

Which of this is correct when calling concerning a job opening: Hello Mrs Goodman. My name is ..... and I'm answering the advertisement for a ..... that was in ..... paper." Or Hello Mrs Goodman. ...
3
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4answers
150 views

“Enter a market” vs. “break into a market”

Could you please shed light on the difference, if any, between "enter" vs. "break into" a market? Are they synonyms and interchangeable, or does the latter of the two imply more force?
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53 views

“Used to go” vs. “attended” — which one is correct here?

I attended x institute for almost ten years. Last year I completed an advanced book entitled Landmark. Taking the advice of one of my teachers, I enrolled at another institute for a teacher ...
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2answers
104 views

What does “get” really mean in “I get you want to help”?

I get you want to help. Does get in this context mean "know"? Or "understand"?
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5answers
331 views

“I don't understand you” vs. “I'm not understanding you” [closed]

Which sentence is correct? What are you talking about? I don't understand you. What are you talking about? I'm not understanding you. That was a question we've had in an exam and it was: ...
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1answer
84 views

How to combine in a sentence two verb–preposition pairs that have the same TWO objects?

How could one combine succinctly two verbs with the same two objects with different prepositions? For example, if I can either add gifts to a box and remove gifts from the box, what would be the most ...
2
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4answers
107 views

Can “was” be abbreviated as “'s?”

Is it possible to write "'s" instead of "was" in a sentence or is completely wrong? For example: She was at home yersterday. She's at home yesterday.
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0answers
11 views

Difference between have to and should [duplicate]

I have a question from long time ... what is the difference between following sentence . You have to read this. You should read this I also wanted to know that where to use both of them.
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1answer
35 views

Is *Network operator* considered singular or plural? [duplicate]

Network Operator pays Company X, and Company X pays Ringtone Provider Network Operator pay Company X, and Company X pay Ringtone Provider Which one is correct?
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23 views

Who knows which tenses of English are not used or used merely? [duplicate]

Who knows which tenses of English are not used or used merely? I wonder which ones you do not use often. As far as I know these are the tenses that you often do not use. am I right? Will have been ...
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35 views

Does ‘approximate' mean “approach” here?

Rousseau's strategy in both Emile and the Social Contract is to develop artificial environments which enable us to approximate our rational nature given our foreseeable human limitations. ...
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2answers
116 views

“All I had, and all I have now, (are vs. were) clues.”

In the sentence, "All I had, and all I have now, were clues", should the verb be "were" or "are", or should the sentence be rephrased so that I don't have to choose between matching the verb to the ...