Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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1answer
914 views

One word for the ta-daa! pose?

I can hardly describe this, which is why I need the one word. When you shout "Ta-daa!" and throw your arms out at your sides, does anyone have a one-word description for what you're doing? Argh.
8
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5answers
11k views

Is “administrate” a valid English verb? What's the difference between it and “administer”?

We had an interesting discussion yesterday about the use of administer and administrate. I feel that there is a case for both usages -- sometimes you might administer something, and other times you ...
7
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6answers
28k views

'Expired' or 'Passed away'?

When someone dies, do we say they expired or passed away? Does the word expired give any more respect when used? Or less respect than passed away?
7
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5answers
387 views

“Gadhafi forces retreat” - how do you understand that?

Our local newspaper had the headline today "Gadhafi forces retreat" and I read it with "retreat" as the verb instead of "forces" as the verb. I know it is a poorly written headline, but which way is ...
6
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2answers
141 views

Verb agreement in “Where is the Messiah and his Kingdom?”

Where is the Messiah and his Kingdom? I think it should be "Where are the Messiah and his kingdom"; it just sounds better! But my friends and even a teacher claim that "is" would be correct.
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2answers
9k views

“The contents are” or “the contents is”

I have the following sentence: The contents of those zip files are normally installed from the Setup. I found I have to use contents instead of content in the sentence. However, do I have to ...
6
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6answers
17k views

“Told” vs. “said to” somebody

I told him that you hate him I said to him that you hate him I was choosing between these two options, and I can't help thinking about the subtle differences. For example, "I told him ...
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2answers
3k views

Hyphens in verb construction containing prefix such as “re”

In semi-formal business writing in the United States, I often observe that writers tend to add a hyphen between a prefix and the root infinitive of verbs. In many of the cases, the resulting verb ...
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0answers
4k views

How many tenses are there in English and what are they? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How many tenses are there in English? The number of grammatical tenses in English makes it confusing as to what they are exactly and what types of tenses there are. ...
4
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2answers
1k views

Simple present vs. present continuous

What is the difference between saying: Are you still working there? Do you still work there? Which is more common in spoken vs written English? Google books returned results for both of ...
4
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4answers
316 views

The verb “to get” + particle …?

In the phrase "to get all crazy" am I correct when I say that the "all crazy" is a particle phrase? Example: I'm up for tonight's party. I'm going to get all crazy.
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2answers
5k views

What does “sunset” mean in this text?

In the definition of USA PATRIOT, I read the following text: Many of the act's provisions were to sunset beginning December 31, 2005, approximately 4 years after its passage. In the months ...
3
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3answers
639 views

Correct usage of “see” vs. “watch”

I have seen them grow up. I have watched them grow up. Though the intended meaning is conveyed in both sentences, I want to know which in this case is a better fit, see or watch.
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3answers
16k views

Which is correct: “is solved” or “has been solved”?

In a technical environment, what is the most suitable sentence to use when answering to someone about a problem that they had and we solved it for them: The problem is solved The problem has been ...
2
votes
3answers
837 views

Does the verb 'rain' belong to some special class of verbs since its subject is always 'it'?

The subject of the verb 'rain' is always 'it' when the referred sense of the verb is 'rain fall' It rained heavily last night. Do you think it will rain again this evening? It looks as ...
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2answers
4k views

“Where am I?” vs. “Where I am?” [closed]

Which is more correct to say in a question? (For example a guy that wakes up in a train) "Where am I?" or "Where I am?"
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2answers
726 views

Do I need to add “to” in every clause in this sentence?

Working in the field helps us to learn how to apply theories to solve real-world problems, to apply […], and to […]. Are the "to" after each comma necessary?
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4answers
3k views

What is the difference between 'tell' and 'say' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Nothing to tell” versus “nothing to say” Both words seem to be used interchangeably. I generally don't differentiate between them and ...
40
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7answers
179k views

“The Dude abides” — what does “abide” mean in that context?

I'm unfamilar with the word "abide" which is famously used the the movie quote "The Dude abides" (The Big Lebowski). Looking it up in a German/English dictionary makes me believe it's "The Dude lives ...
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7answers
59k views

What is the difference between 'make decision' and 'take decision'?

What is the difference between make decision and take decision? When to use the one and when the other?
40
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8answers
6k views

Can I “wear an umbrella”?

Does it make sense to say the following? Yesterday I wore an umbrella and a coat.
14
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2answers
107k views

'I get it' vs. 'I got it'

When someone tells me something, how should I respond, "I get it" or "I got it"? I have a feeling that "I got it" means "I already knew the thing before you told me," and "I get it" means "Now I know ...
10
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4answers
14k views

“He has yet to” vs. “he is yet to”

He has yet to receive an appointment. He is yet to receive an appointment. Is there any difference in meaning? Is one more correct than the other?
5
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2answers
526 views

Is “nothing but birds and a few insects” singular or plural?

Nothing but birds and a few insects [was/were] to be seen. In that sentence, should the verb agree with "nothing" or with "birds and a few insects"?
14
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8answers
5k views

Is there any subtle difference between “to study” and “to learn”?

I don't know how to phrase my question better, but I just want to know if there will be any little difference if I directly replace one with the other.
11
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3answers
13k views

“Bless you” & sneezing

Why do you say Bless you when people sneeze? Is there good reason or history? When someone sneeze, if I don't say Bless you, am I rude?
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5answers
19k views

What is the difference between “begin” and “start”?

The children are eager to start the novel. or The children are eager to begin the novel.
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1answer
4k views

How to correctly use the present perfect tense

This link states that: When you use the present perfect tense you have to be talking about a period of time that you still consider to be going on. For example, if it’s still morning, you can say, ...
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4answers
6k views

Meaning of 'up/down' after a verb [closed]

There are lots of instances of using 'up' or 'down' after verbs. Instances: eat up, drink up, meet up, finish up, start up, fill up, clean up, wipe up, tie up, etc. What do they add as meaning to a ...
9
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3answers
10k views

Should I say “Your order is now complete” or “Your order is now completed”?

When a user finishes an order on my website, what's the correct way? Your order is now complete. Your order is now completed.
7
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3answers
6k views

needn't = don't need to?

Are these two sentences equivalent? You needn't pay at once. You don't need to pay at once. If yes, which one would you recommend? Is it an US/GB thing?
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votes
2answers
25k views

“Expected of” vs. “expected from”

It is expected of/from you to find the solution. Such rude behavior was not expected of/from you. I am quite sure that from is the correct usage in both cases, but of could be used in the ...
5
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4answers
6k views

Differences between Verb + to be + adjectives and Verb + adjective

If you have a more illustrative title, feel free to change it. I searched but I couldn't find one. This may be an easy and trivial question; if so, I am sorry. What are the differences between ...
5
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3answers
5k views

Is it correct to say “I found the map” or “I have found the map”?

Is it correct to say "I found the map" or "I have found the map"?
4
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1answer
6k views

Is there a difference in meaning between “does not seem to” and “seems not to”?

Consider the following sentences: Try not to be alarmed if a rule doesn’t seem to work for a specific sentence. Try not to be alarmed if a rule seems not to work for a specific sentence. ...
4
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4answers
636 views

“If” and “would be” when talking about future events

I am watching a basketball game right now, and the team that I am rooting for is losing. I want to say that if they win, that would be something. Which one is the correct way to state it? If Miami ...
2
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1answer
50k views

where should we use has/have been and had been?

Where should we use "has/have been" and "had been"? What is the difference between them?
11
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9answers
32k views

Is “bolded” a word?

Is bolded a word? I just bolded the important text in this sentence.
9
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3answers
339 views

Verbed color names and “-en”

"whitened", "blackened", and "reddened"; but "yellowed", "grayed", and "blued". Is there some rule or is it just one of those things? "Greened" makes sense; no one is going to say "greenened". ...
9
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7answers
2k views

New verb: “to verbal”

I seem to be noticing this one entering the popular lexicon lately, but cannot find a good definition. Examples: No, you're just verballing... Leakegate: Leake verballed Richard Dawkins ...
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4answers
4k views

Should proper nouns used as verbs be capitalized?

When a proper noun like "Skype" is used as a verb ("Skyping"), should it be capitalized? My thinking is that it should be capitalized because the root is a proper noun. Does anyone know of a rule ...
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9answers
921 views

“I'm going to take and stir the cake mix”

Please explain why this sentence is grammatically incorrect. I'm going to take and stir the cake mix.
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4answers
856 views

Why is “rollback it” incorrect?

I recently wrote the following sentence: Please roll it back. But if I were to describe the action on its own I would say: This rollback was due to objections by the original author. If I ...
7
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3answers
2k views

Are there any cases where “prepend” cannot be replaced by “prefix”?

"Prepend" is seeing a fair amount of use, both in programmer jargon and elsewhere. Its use seems to come from a desire to create a word that is a direct parallel to "append." However, such a word ...
6
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3answers
275 views

Better term to put on a label of a bottle of milk to describe that it's 'made' in a particular geographic location

While waiting for the kettle to boil this morning, I was idling and reading the label on the bottle of milk and was struck by the declaration: "Permeate free, made in WA". Here's a shot of the label ...
6
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1answer
1k views

Why is the verb form of “record” pronounced [ri-kawrd] but the noun form is pronounced [rek-erd]?

Is there a different origin of pronunciation style for record as a verb and as a noun? Fun fact: in OS X, if you type say "this record" and say "record this" — the text to speech system picks up the ...
5
votes
1answer
702 views

Flexibility of English: Always so?

The other day I read a question about nouns being used as verbs. An answer informed that in English any word can be used as a verb, but that it is not so in other languages. Beyond verbs, English is a ...
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7answers
7k views

Is a sentence always grammatically incorrect if it has no verb?

Is the following grammatically correct? My friend says the second sentence is grammatically incorrect, but couldn't explain why. I have always been fascinated by statistics. The different ways in ...
5
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2answers
823 views

When can “have” be used without “got”?

I read this article and now I'm confused when got can be omitted when using have. Could this be explained in plain English without technical terms? Is there a different usage in past tense?
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4answers
970 views

Jameson whiskey commercial construction with implicit verb

While watching the Daily Show, a commercial came on. Here is the construction: "...When the Hawk of Achill took a barrel of John Jameson's whiskey, well that was another matter. But Jameson was ...