Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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3answers
127 views

Use of plural with “respectively” when referring to a property

If you are referring to one property but are giving the respective values for two different things do you use the singular or plural form? Can the property be treated as a mass noun so that it takes ...
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0answers
30 views

Verb for “to make something show its characteristics” [closed]

Using a real dataset with a limited variety of characteristics might fail to _____ the true performance of the algorithms. I need a verb with the meaning "to make something show its ...
25
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12answers
3k views

What's the word for paper “decaying”?

Imagine an old map, a map with a path to a treasure, like the ones you remember from cartoons. The map's partially destroyed, because it's so old, and it has been exposed to air, and heat, and water, ...
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4answers
87 views

A single verb that means two entities mutually supplement one another

I'm about to take a degree in Linguistics and Japanese. I want to explain my thought that linguistics supplements Japanese, and Japanese supplements linguistics. Is there a single verb that implies ...
3
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2answers
208 views

“Explain the reason why”

Is it natural to say "he explained the reason why he was late"? I suspect that it doesn't make sense. But I reckon "That is the reason why he's sick" is acceptable with "the reason". Could it be ...
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1answer
46 views

“to pine away from”

Definition 1.1 states: Suffer a mental and physical decline, especially because of a broken heart Yet what does "pine away from" mean? Does it equal "to pine from" = to suffer from? Is the ...
0
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2answers
79 views

Is it “restricted to” or “restricted from”? [closed]

I came across this sentence: The power to rule was restricted to ministers, and it was restricted from king. What is the difference between "restricted to" and "restricted from" here?
4
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3answers
361 views

A formal word for 'disemvowel'

According to Collins English Dictionary, disemvowel is a transitive verb meaning 'to remove the vowels from (a word in a text message, email, etc.) in order to abbreviate it'. Since the ...
6
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1answer
103 views

Grammar rules for parellelism in comparisons and variations according to verb placement

I'm an academic editor in the field of medicine and I often come across complex comparisons. My question is specifically regarding how the placement of the verb affects the the parallelism of the ...
3
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1answer
198 views

Why the “give” in “I don't give a flying f***”?

I’m not a native speaker. I know that I don't give a flying fuck means "I don’t care", but how did it come to mean that? Specifically, why does the verb give mean "don’t care" here?
2
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1answer
54 views

Intuition - “to enjoin”

Would someone please explain the etymology or the intuition behind this verb? I'm aware of the etymological fallacy, but still want to intuit its definition.
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1answer
47 views

There is vs There are

I'm aware of (multitudinous) related, similar questions concerning this, but I still feel tentative for the following example. I also referenced ...
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2answers
67 views

“to enquire of”

I referenced Prepositions used with "inquire", yet I'm still strained about the verb plus the preposition "to enquire of"". I can't pinpoint why, though. When is it legitimate to omit "of" ...
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2answers
42 views

“Fill in” or “enter” the text fields

In the documentation file I am working on right now, I have to inform user about filling some optional and mandatory text fields. Which verb better describes the "putting some text in the field" - ...
2
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1answer
94 views

What does “reputation-bibbing” mean?

I read this sentence: "In all his writing (and, apparently, conversation) [Roy] Jenkins loved reputation-bibbing, loved all kinds of ranking, especially of politicians." What does ...
1
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1answer
78 views

“I let him do it” and “I allow him to do it”, why exactly does one require 'to'?

I let him do it. and I allow him to do it. Why does the latter require to? What are the "rules" of using to with an infinitive? When is it necessary?
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2answers
32 views

Usage of the word “coordinated” in a professional report

Which is a more apt way of using the word coordinated in the given context: I thank Mr. XYZ, who coordinated with me on the project. OR I thank Mr. XYZ, with whom I coordinated on the project. ...
0
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1answer
44 views

Open vs Open Itself

Recently I read sentence like '... section opens with {{^section}} ...' Here, I guess the verb open does not require ITSELF (just open instead of open itself). Is it some group of verbs OPEN ...
2
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2answers
53 views

Difference between “hop the rocks quickly” and “quickly hop the rocks”

I'm trying to decide which sentence is correct, or if they both are. which would you recommend as easier to read/understand for the average reader? Hop the rocks quickly and get the star. ...
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3answers
68 views

Should we repeat the verb after “rather than”?

Super AMOLED Plus uses a traditional RGB RGB (3 subpixels) arrangement typically used in LCD displays rather than the PenTile RGBG pixel matrix (2 subpixels) used in Super AMOLED. or Super ...
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0answers
24 views

Which of the two is correct usage? [duplicate]

What did they have for lunch? or What did they had for lunch?
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2answers
29 views

Is this usage correct?

Is this usage correct according to these examples? I need to get this room left by students. is the above correct and if so does it mean the same as I need to cause this room to be left by students or ...
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3answers
103 views

Earthquake As A Verb

Is there a way to use earthquake as a verb, i.e.: It started earthquaking... What's the proper way to express earthquake as a verb?
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3answers
154 views

What did “make love” mean in the 1920s?

This 1921 article gives "Ten Pointers for Domestic Happiness". Pointer V reads: Make love to your wife; continue to be her sweetheart. Neglect begets indifference that is fatal to married life. ...
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1answer
39 views

“Sleep through a single night” vs. “sleep a single night”

For the next two weeks he did not sleep through a single night. Can we recast the sentence as follows? For the next two weeks he did not sleep a single night. That is, is the use of through ...
3
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4answers
253 views

Is there a single-word verb meaning “to perform cunnilingus on”?

The single word for to perform fellatio on is the verb fellate. Is there an analogous word for cunnilingus?
4
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3answers
171 views

Is there a word/term for “verbs which indicate the underlying sentiment of a statement”?

Sorry, I'm not sure the best way to describe this, but hopefully you understand what I mean. Something like the result of the verb(to say) and any adverb(insultingly) = verb(to insult). Another way ...
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3answers
101 views

A verb that describes an action by someone who is new in town

Is there a verb that describes someone from the countryside (ie: new in town ) who tries to behave , dress and speak like its people to fit in and not be taken for a redneck ?
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1answer
100 views

conceived of as vs. conceived as

When I want to write that some something has been "taken to mean" or "understood" or "interpreted as" XYZ, I sometimes use the phrase "to conceive of something as XYZ, where XYZ usually is a longer ...
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0answers
73 views

Are there nouns that embody adjectives+verbs? (Not asking about attributive nouns) [closed]

I'm not sure if there's a better way for me to word my question. I've sorted through "noun" + "adjective" search results here on SE, but found nothing approximating what I'm after. I'm trying to ...
2
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1answer
84 views

What are the rules for combining verbs with and?

I am curious what the rules for combining verbs into a "compound verb" are. For example, is it proper to combine "guess and check" into a single verb as in: I guessed and checked that the answer ...
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8answers
1k views

Hypernym for reading a book and listening to an audiobook

I want to state that "I've read 10 books this year", but the books in question can be both dead-wood books and audiobooks. Is there a verb that works here in place of 'read'? Maybe something like ...
2
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6answers
93 views

Misusing 'hone' to express subtly different idea that combines 'hone' and 'home in' [duplicate]

This question is similar, but I'm looking for something subtly different. Suppose you have a philosophy describing a way of thinking and acting. Acting on this philosophy requires work: your mind ...
3
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4answers
79 views

Regions and reasons for the usage of “sleep” as “go to sleep”

This question is very closely linked to this english.SE question, which discusses the usage of "sleep" as a verb meaning "go to sleep" and inspired by this ell.SE question, in which the accepted ...
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14answers
4k views

Is there a verb for remaining silent?

Dutch has the verb zwijgen, which means remaining silent. Ik zwijg means I remain silent or I say nothing. It is also often used as an imperative, similar to shut up. I have been discussing this ...
2
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2answers
57 views

Deal in vs deal with

I wrote this sentence: "The scientists dealing in complex systems have proposed...." But then I thought 'dealing with' would be correct. Are they interchangeable?
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2answers
93 views

Do we “resolve a doubt” or “dispel a doubt”?

When writing in a academic setting (think of a letter to your professor), what is the most appropriate way of saying this? I will be grateful if you could resolve this doubt in your paper. I ...
0
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3answers
67 views

What is the antonym of the verb “to depend”? [closed]

I've found in this community this question and this other question mentioning the antonym of the adjective dependent, which is independent. What I wanted to know is how to use a proper antonym verb ...
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2answers
82 views

Omission of a verb?

This is from George Orwell's Down and Out in Paris and London: "Thereupon a whole variegated chorus of yells, as windows were flung open on every side and half the street joined in the quarrel." ...
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3answers
71 views

“Let A be a set, [let] B [be] a group”

Math proves often start with "let". For example: Let A be a set. This is easy. But what about introducing several things in that manner? Let A be a set, B be a group, and C be a number. ...
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7answers
135 views

Non-negative opposite of “to prefer”

What is the antonym of "to prefer" that does not sound too negative? Merriam-Webster lists several antonyms for "to prefer", but all of them sound a bit too negative to me. In a situation with many ...
2
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4answers
80 views

“love to be with” or “love being with” [duplicate]

My sons have a good friend called Ben. I thought I could say, " My sons love to be with Ben". But when I said it to his mother, she replied to me by saying, "Ben also loves being with them as well." ...
2
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6answers
180 views

To make a lengthy process instantaneous

What is a word that describes the process of speeding up a lengthy process, so that it can be described as instantaneous? In a sense of to remove any delay. Instantiate comes to mind, but it is also ...
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7answers
571 views

What is the verb to use?

I am looking for the verb or expression to use to describe when you type quickly and nervously on your computer keyboard to find something (on a search engine for instance).
2
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1answer
67 views

Connexion pronunciation & verb

Connexion is the original and variant spelling of "connection", common until at least the 19th century, and still occasionally used in British English (it was the house style of The Times of London ...
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3answers
79 views

Verb of probability

I need to express my idea that I need to generate probabilistic data from raw data. Is there a verb that can express this meaning ? For example, computing probabilities for sensor data => ...
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5answers
55 views

An expression for undercharging

Is there an expression in English for what someone does if he/she charges well below the market rate for a product or a service? Here in Israel we call it "breaking the market" - a practiced shunned ...
0
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1answer
61 views

Is it ever correct to say “turn down the building”?

I'm a non-native speaker of English, and so is my wife. We were talking to a native speaker when at one point, my wife commented, "They should turn down the building." I've never heard of the phrase ...
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2answers
65 views

Say I wrote down 25 instead of 52 by accident. What is the right verb I can use here to specify what I did to these two digits? [closed]

I'm looking for a verb/some verbs here so I can say: I (verb) those two digits and that's why you read 25 here (instead of 52). I don't want to use "mix up" because I'd like to specify this "action" ...
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3answers
108 views

Words like “do/does/did” to emphasize, but for “am/is/are”

So X said to Y: I did tell you yesterday! As far as I know, the word did there is to emphasize my point or tell him that I'm so sure I've told him the story yesterday. What I want to ask is, ...