Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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1answer
59 views

'is' or 'are' in lists of counted nouns [duplicate]

Which of the following is correct? Does the is/are depend on the total number of things in the list, or only on the thing immediately following the is/are? There is 1 apple and 1 orange available. ...
0
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1answer
67 views

“I'm not going to have…” vs. “I'm going not to have…” vs. “I'm going to not have”

Is there a rule that governs when you change around the placement of "not" in a sentence relative to the verb? For example: I'm NOT going to Spain to have fun. or I'm going, NOT to have fun, ...
2
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5answers
157 views

Is there another word for 'listening' to an answer?

We 'listen' when we're being told something. Is there another verb for 'listening' to an answer to a question we asked? Is 'receiving' an appropriate word for it? It sounds reasonable in the context ...
0
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3answers
109 views

How to say that event is happening now? [closed]

Imagine if I sit in the classroom and I want to say that some lecture is going in another classroom. I what to express that meaning using active voice, like Lecture is happening now But for me, ...
0
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1answer
37 views

The process creates the prize? [closed]

I would like to know which one of the sentences is correct and why? The process create the prize. or The process creates the prize.
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2answers
117 views

Can I use the word “promise” with gerund?

Is it possible to use gerund after the verb "promise"? For example, in the sentence "He promised cleaning the window. I'd prefer to say: He promised to clean the window. But today I was told that this ...
1
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3answers
138 views

Is “cry” an intransitive verb, or can it be transitive? - as in “Cry me a river”

When I look up the word, it should be an intransitive verb (no object). However, I'm still curious about the title "Cry me a river". Can I say that "I cried a bucket"?
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3answers
41 views

Alternate word for impersonate in terms of Items or things

Well actually I'm searching for the right word for a particular scenario or maybe behavior. Suppose I go to a shop and ask for an item but they don't have it. Now the sales person's priority is to ...
0
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3answers
64 views

Using Crippled as a verb [closed]

Is it right to use the word crippled as a verb with the sense disabled/unable to do things? An example sentence: I am crippled to complete my tasks as I didn't receive the credentials.
0
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1answer
76 views

Usage of “to find out” [closed]

Your father climbed to some rough rocks near the coast to find out that under the rocks, our friend Lake lies severely wounded. Is this usage of "to find something by chance (as a result of ...
0
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2answers
110 views

“Could not have been” vs. “must not have been”

What's the difference between "could not have been" and "must not have been"? For example, That could not have been an easy task. That must not have been an easy task. I've seen both ...
0
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2answers
50 views

Using “heretofore” in the past perfect

Is it grammatically correct to use "heretofore" in the past perfect? ...the king's power, which had heretofore been absolute. The meaning of "heretofore" is "before now", but would it still work ...
0
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3answers
56 views

How are multiple, alternative direct objects governed by multiple, alternative verbs?

Title 18 USC Sec. 1519 begins: Whoever knowingly alters, destroys, mutilates, conceals, covers up, falsifies, or makes a false entry in any record, document, or tangible object . . . Question: ...
0
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2answers
80 views

“The problem is he is stingy”

I have this sentence: The problem is he is very stingy with his money. But I feel it sounds weird or even wrong with the two ises so close. Is the sentence structure grammatical? If it isn't, ...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

Use of 'swag' as a verb

I came across this post on swag (the slang word): Attempt to swag should ideally be accompanied by apt spellings. I have seen swag being used only as a noun. I know swagger is a verb, but is ...
0
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2answers
54 views

Using 'ride' vs. 'drive' when it comes to a motorcycle

Suppose I am offering someone a ride home. I know "I'll give you a ride home" would be correct. But can I also use ride as a transitive verb, as follows? Come, I'll ride you home. I'm asking ...
1
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1answer
53 views

Usage of “coruscating”

Can coruscating be used as a one word adjective to describe "interesting and exciting"? Basically the usage is "his interesting and exciting research work" which will end up as "his coruscating ...
0
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2answers
58 views

Which verb is used to tell: check and pass it

I'm looking for a verb that when I'm saying: XXX it, then I would mean: Check it and if it was valid, pass it What should be the XXX? Or any verb that have a similar meaning as the mentioned sentence. ...
2
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5answers
145 views

“Share me” or “Share with me”?

I heard people saying: Can you please share me the slides? or Can you share me the note, etc.? I think it should be: Can you please share the slides with me? or Can you share ...
1
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2answers
103 views

Can I use 'drenching' to mean 'being drenched'?

I understand 'drench' means to soak or get wet. Can I say 'I'm drenching in the rain' to mean that I'm standing in the rain and getting soaked by it? I mostly see 'drenching' being used only as a ...
1
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1answer
79 views

Past simple vs present perfect

I have read many online articles. I've read questions and answers on this site. I still can't get my head wrapped around the difference between past simple and present perfect I know the difference ...
0
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0answers
35 views

Is it wrong to say “I enjoy to see the butterflies around the flowers.”? [duplicate]

Do I have to say always "I enjoy seeing"?
1
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1answer
49 views

“To refuse oneself” vs “to refuse”

In which cases can we use "to refuse oneself" instead of "to refuse"? Can you use "oneself" to give more emphasis to the sentence, or are you only allow to use it when you refuse something done to ...
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3answers
120 views

What is the difference between “Drop in” and “pop in”

In British English do "drop in to see someone" and "pop in to see someone" have different meanings?
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3answers
75 views

Omission of the ''to be'' verb from this sentence

My instructor asked me to omit the ''to be'' verb in this sentence: Her house was across the street, an enormous neoclassical edifice with a formal garden. I tried: Situated across the street, her ...
50
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12answers
7k views

You “show” someone a picture. You “---” someone a song?

In Maltese, we have a verb meaning "to show" corresponding to "to see/to look", and we have a different verb corresponding to "to hear/to listen": inti tara stampa (you look at a picture.) ---- ...
0
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2answers
77 views

Classification - There is/are

What is the official 'name' for the 'there is' / 'there are' construction? Is it a verb phrase or a lexical verb? I'd say possibly a verb but it must be the most difficult term to Google.
22
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7answers
4k views

“Take a photo” — why “take”?

I don't understand why it's "take a photo". Why take? Is there any rule for this?
0
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2answers
82 views

A Preceded By B, so which comes first?

I was reading a technical requirement documentation and it says: A Save Event preceded by the user un-checking the "Active" check box... So does it mean: they un-check the "Active" check box and ...
0
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1answer
83 views

“A book to be read” vs “a book to read”

Which is grammatically correct: "a book to be read" or "a book to read"? And what is the difference?
5
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2answers
1k views

Dust vs. Undust?

The entry for "dust" from LDOCE says: dust1 (n.) [uncountable] → HOUSEHOLD dry powder consisting of extremely small bits of dirt that is in buildings on furniture, floors, etc. if they ...
0
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2answers
64 views

“is thought to have been” verb tense

What tense is the phrase "is thought to have been" in the sentence "Bruce Lee is thought to have been the first actor to do his own stunts"? Also, why is it correct to say "to do his own stunts" ...
13
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4answers
1k views

Word that corresponds to “flew” or “drove” when riding a train

My daughter recently journeyed several hundred miles by rail. Had she taken a bus, I could say: "She was bussed from San Francisco to Houston" Had she flown in an airplane, I could say: ...
2
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3answers
229 views

Can a human “bless” anything?

Does the word "bless" apply only to God? For example, can a human bless anything (such as "bless the day")? Or can only God bless? Note, I am asking about the usage of the word "bless", and not about ...
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3answers
62 views

is “imperative” correct here

I am writing a piece of software related to meetings. Participants are invited to a meeting using a button which the command "invite" is written to be pressed by the person who wished to do the ...
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0answers
60 views

Why present simple not continuous

I have a few sentences here: A) The instructor explains the diagram to students who ask questions during the lecture. Why are "explain" and "ask" used here in present simple, and not in the ...
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0answers
26 views

Verb to be before pronoun in declarative sentences [duplicate]

I saw this sentence in a newspaper cartoon: Not only are you dysfunctional — you appear to be completely spineless as well. Is the verb are in the right position?
8
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5answers
897 views

What does it mean: “… was three days dying”?

Not being a native English speaker, I still like to read in English from time to time. In my current book was written that someone "... was three days dying." Does this mean that the person died three ...
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0answers
15 views

Nouns in a series with singular or plural verb? [duplicate]

Which is correct? Cultivation, possession, and distribution of corn is ... Or Cultivation, possession, and distribution of corn are ...
1
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1answer
106 views

“Dream, dreamt” and “learn, learnt” irregular verbs: correct or not? [duplicate]

Often when I am writing emails or any other documents, I would like to use the irregular forms of dream (dreamt) or learn (learnt). But the computer spellcheckers always underline these words as being ...
0
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1answer
62 views

Crib: to Complain [closed]

People in India use crib as a word for complain as in 'Don't crib about it'. I always thought this was wrong usage, but I recently checked in OED online and found that sense 9b says b. To ...
3
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1answer
66 views

Can more options use “is”

So I've been learning German on Duolingo (great app by the way if you want to learn a language). I know you guys don't want translations here, but this is more about the English. Of course, not all ...
0
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2answers
85 views

Can the word, “art” be used as a verb to mean “create” art?

In the Washington Post (July 27 issue) article titled, “Figuring out what matters in a midlife ‘Is this all there is?’ crisis” the columnist, Carolyn Hax writes as follows: “Tweak as you need to, ...
1
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1answer
64 views

When using “Used To” in a sentence with two clauses, do you change the verb tense in the second clause?

I was helping a friend proofread one of her essays on the short story The Lottery. She had written this sentence: I think the lottery used to have a specific reason and represent something in the ...
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2answers
71 views

A simple question about syntax [closed]

I guess this would be a pretty simple question to answer. Is this sentence correct: The player appears to have not connected. I am having my doubts about the appears to have not part. P.S.: Not ...
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0answers
33 views

Verb form of suds - is “sudses” permissible? [closed]

If I want to say, for example, that a cleanser produces suds, could I say "This shampoo sudses"? I think the answer to this question depends on whether the verb is considered to be "sud" or "suds." ...
0
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1answer
70 views

Difference between “queue” and “enqueue” [closed]

What is the difference between queue and enqueue given that both are verbs?
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3answers
57 views

Can “backup” be used as a verb in the context of data management? [duplicate]

I have heard backup being used as a verb in the sense of I have to backup my hard disk by non-native English speakers (the English noun backup is also used in other languages, for example in ...
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6answers
325 views

Connotation of “appease” [closed]

Is "Bob did what he could in his capability to appease them" a positive or negative comment about Bob?
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9answers
169 views

Word/phrase for importance being reduced

For example when you stop doing one thing before it's finished, and start something else because you, or someone else, considers it more important than the thing you were doing. The thing you was ...