Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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Usage of “back” as a verb. Can we use “We will back soon”?

Can we use "We will back soon"? Or is the correct form "We will be back soon"? What about "We'll be back soon"?
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3answers
62 views

Is there a viable synonym for the verb “nod”?

Reading through my manuscript, I realize I have overused the verb "nod" - as in "This sounds great", she agreed nodding. It seems to me there is a slight problem in that there aren't any great, ...
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20 views

Is there a word that means “doing the same with”?

Yesterday my teacher gave me an assignment. Everything was good until I saw this question: Find the word form of "like" to fit in the gap: "Just water these plants twice a week, and ___ the ones in ...
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2answers
46 views

Word for the act of databasing

Database has found its way into the English vernacular as a verb as well as a noun. I can have a database, but I can also database information. I have heard used the other verb tenses 'databased' ...
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1answer
22 views

Steps to help design the system v.s. Steps to help the system design? [closed]

Are both correct? There is a difference between them? Cheers!
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2answers
57 views

Does it seem vs. does it seems [duplicate]

Which form is correct? Does it seems OK to you? Does it seem OK to you? The second one is more intuitive to me, but the first one renders more search results in Google.
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1answer
49 views

Why would “to center around” be illogical? [duplicate]

I have seen the discussions of "to center on" vs "to center around", and usually the argument is that "to center X around Y" is illogical. The counter-argument is generally that it is an idiom and ...
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2answers
93 views

Why exactly is this sentence the way it is?

I couldn't explain it in the title, my apologies. Now the sentence, in indirect-speech: Anne asked me who my favourite actor was I know this sentence is correct, but WHY isn't it the following? ...
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2answers
57 views

The word for the tipping point. Point of change

Looking for the word that displays the point of change, the apex, that point or event that changed something it was the "" of the day, her thoughts, the game, etc.
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1answer
44 views

Forms of the verb “to be” followed by “graduated from”

I know the old fashioned way of saying that someone has been graduated from somewhere is to say that "someone was graduated from school". Does this mean that you can say "He is graduated from that ...
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1answer
59 views

Proper use of “be”

He required that the essay be both brief and cogent. Is there an issue with the verb "be" in this sentence?
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4answers
80 views

Grammatical rule for using has vs. does

Last week a young adult from Haiti, enrolled in our ESL class, asked the following question when presented with the following: Tea has caffeine, and so does coffee. His question was: "Why can't you ...
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5answers
83 views

Verb of “a factory” [closed]

Speaking of programing design patterns, there is "a factory". What would be the correct verb? To factorize / factorise is the mathmatical term not related to "a factory". To factor [in ...] is a ...
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22 views

Right form verb

What is the correct form of following sentence: We helped him finsh/finishing/to finish/in finishing the work. Please help me giving right answere.
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0answers
41 views

What is the opposite of “borked”?

What would be the opposite word when something was borked, but it is not borked anymore? For example in the context when the traffic was borked, but it's not anymore (like unclogged).
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1answer
42 views

Which one is correct: “are (the) buses” vs “is (the) buses”?

This was a question from a test given to our students. The question was "What do you think the best form of transportation is for your city" Most of the students answer in this manner: "I think the ...
4
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1answer
59 views

What is the English equivalent of gatasan?

It literally means to milk. It also means a dairy cow. It could be both a noun or verb. v. To use someone for the money he/she can give you. n. Someone (a girlfriend, husband) that you ...
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1answer
46 views

Singular or plural verb after a list containing three items?

I'm trying to clear this up for a client. He's using the slogan "When Time, Quality and Value Matters – Count on TEAM." "Matters" sounds completely wrong to me so I changed it to "matter" on his ...
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0answers
19 views

Scientists found VS Scientists Find [duplicate]

I am not a native English speaker and today I came across that article title: "Scientists Find A “Weak Spot” In HIV That May Pave the Way to a Vaccine" So, is "Find" used in the correct tense? ...
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2answers
59 views

Simple past tense vs. perfect past tense [duplicate]

What are the difference between the following sentence? I ate apples. I have eaten apples. When should we use simple past tense? When should we use perfect past tense?
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2answers
61 views

Noun and verb without an auxiliary verb?

I have zero idea what this construction is called. Here are a few examples that I've just whipped up: He was fired, and his friend punished. He was robbed, and his brother kidnapped. The idea is ...
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3answers
695 views

“There is to be no drinking beer today” What is the status of “no” and “beer” here?

There's no doubting her sincerity. There's no telling what she's done. There's no guessing which way they'll bolt. There's to be no drinking beer today. There's no telling her. The word no is ...
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3answers
53 views

Infinitive verses present participle

I often come across this type of thing and wondered if anyone could tell me the correct usage. I have a sentence that reads "As you go through various settings, you will have the option to allow ...
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1answer
42 views

Parsing verb objects

Two questions: 1) Can there be a prepositional phrase between the verb and its objetcts as in this example: "They see in front of their eyes the two towers." or is that grammatically incorrect?...
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While all states face similar industrial waste problems

While all states face similar industrial waste problems, the predominating industries and the regulatory environment of the states obviously determines the types and amounts of waste produced, as well ...
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1answer
21 views

The date was advanced / The date has been advanced

What would be the difference between "The date of the meeting has been advanced by one week" versus "The date of the meeting was advanced by one week" The latter I've found in a dictionary. The ...
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3answers
75 views

Is there a word for identifying oneself with a brand?

The title seems clear to me but I'll add an example: There are several different apps for Telegram (Android, iOS, PC, etc) that all have the name Telegram and use similar Logos, designs and have a ...
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40 views

Have vs Have been

If Jim had taken Sandra to a romantic film, she wouldn't have been so frightened. If I hadn't missed the train, I wouldn't have been late. If she had known the address, she would have been able to ...
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24 views

Antonym for “infix” (“outfix”?)

infix: implant or insert firmly in something, as in the particles of mercury will infix themselves in the structure of the other metal How about the opposite? Is there something called outfix? I.e. ...
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1answer
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73 views

Is 'not' a modal verb?

In the following sentence, 'has' is an auxiliary verb and 'seen' is the main verb. What is the role of 'not'? Is it a verb? She has not seen the movie. Can you give some evidence about why not is or ...
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4answers
57 views

hiccup-like noise made while trying to speak when stabbed?

Say someone was stabbed and he bleeds but he remains conscious. Axiomatically if he were to speak he would speak with extreme difficulty. What do you call the hiccup-like noise/sound he makes while ...
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2answers
71 views

had vs. had had [duplicate]

What are the different meanings of the following sentences? I had had too many chocolates, so I was too full to eat dinner yesterday. I had too many chocolates, so I was too full to eat dinner ...
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0answers
15 views

“had” use in past perfect tense [duplicate]

I called her, but she had already left for the day. I was taught that past perfect tense is used to describe an action before another action in the past. However, look at the following setntece: ...
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1answer
32 views

They have been vs. they will have been [duplicate]

What are the different meaning int the following sentences? They have been dating for a year now. They will have been dating for a year now.
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2answers
54 views

Can't answer a question in arguments [closed]

If two people are debating, and one of them asked the other person a question and he got confused and couldn't answer this question. But he is impressed with this question. Is there any verb ...
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2answers
139 views

I sent … vs. I have sent … vs. I had sent you an email already [closed]

Which of the following sentences are correct? If all of them are correct, what are their different meanings? I sent you an email already. I have sent you an email already. I had sent you an email ...
2
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1answer
46 views

clad as an active verb?

I've been spending some time on a home repair forum and I keep coming across the word clad used in the imperative or present tense active form. E.g. Clad your home in brick. He clads his home in ...
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27 views

Tricky Subject Verb Agreement Examples [duplicate]

One of the people has or One of the people have gone? I would use 'One of the people has gone', but I am not really sure if it's redundant to use that these days. Please help.
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30 views

What's the proper verb to describe quantitative research?

What would be the proper verb for an action that measures with numbers something that used to be measured qualitatively? I mean the verb for converting quality to quantity. For example: Fornel (...
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1answer
20 views

Descriptions of frequency versus present tense

Is there ever a difference between descriptions of frequency and the present tense? For example, is there a difference between "I speak English." (referring to frequent speaking of English) and "I ...
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2answers
50 views

Widow, Widowed; Widower, What? [closed]

A woman who loses her husband is a widow; she is widowed. A man who loses his wife is a widower. Is there an equivalent male term for widowed?
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1answer
38 views

Is it was or were? [closed]

Which one is here correct? "...the employment rate of women were/was always higher.... I think it is was but women is plural so it has to be were, or?! Thanks
0
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1answer
37 views

'represented for' wrong usage?

Can someone please confirm that the grammar in this video is off. It's supposedly a teaser video for a new product from a Chinese company. https://youtube.com/watch?v=CfgviCjtvg0 Shouldn't ...
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3answers
63 views

“The prevalence of both X & Y increased with age, and * especially high in subgroup.” Was/were?

The prevalence of both diabetes and obesity increased with age, and * especially high in ≥65-year-olds. Should * be was/were? A professional language checker left my usage of "were" in one ...
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1answer
31 views

A word that describes the act of running a company [closed]

Is there a word that describes the act of running a company? Preferably a single word.
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0answers
24 views

parallelism in linking verbs and verbs

Is the following sentence parallel? "He was young, wore expensive clothing, and had good facial features." Isn't "was" in this sentence a linking verb and thus a verb making the whole sentence ...
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4answers
74 views

verb - Is there a word for 'de-acknowledging'?

Is there a singular word for the act of 'de-acknowledging' or 'removing an acknowledgement'. For context: I am creating a computer program with a list of issues. Issues can be acknowledged. But these ...
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0answers
30 views

is there a name for adjectives that end in -ive formed from verbs?

Examples include 'declarative', 'manipulative', 'accusative'. Is there a name for these adjectives that describe something of or related to their base verb?
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2answers
46 views

Using “to start” as a ditransitive verb

In the Song I Started a Joke by The Bee Gees (I recommend watching this cover – it's amazing), the lyrics contain phrases like […] which started the whole world crying […] This seems to be non-...