Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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44 views

Common verbs with high description power [closed]

I'm looking for a list of the most common verbs that have the highest descriptive power. By descriptive power I mean that using only a subset of the verbs in the list one should be able to describe ...
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3answers
114 views

Are modal verbs and auxiliary verbs actually verbs?

A friend recently told me that "can" is a rare verb without an infinitive. I have since looked it up and discovered it is an auxiliary verb. In my mind it modifies a "proper" verb in much the same way ...
46
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14answers
2k views

Central Pennsylvanian English speakers: what are the limitations on the “needs washed” construction?

In the Central Pennsylvania dialect of English (and possibly elsewhere), the following construction is possible: This car needs washed. (=needs to be washed) The room needs cleaned. (=needs ...
5
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2answers
200 views

Dialectal and historical usage of “not care” in the meaning of “not mind”

In standard Present-day English, "I don't care to be there" means the same as "I don't wish to be there." Apparently, this is not the case in some present and historical dialects. Wylene P. Dial ...
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6answers
1k views

“Do a shop” for “go shopping”

This has puzzled me for a few years now. When preceded by 'a', shop becomes a noun. Does "do a shop" even make sense then? The correct phrase for me was always "go shopping", or similar. Can ...
2
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1answer
89 views

“Need not be” vs. “Need not to be” [duplicate]

As a native English speaker, I find the phrase "The hammer need not to be large for..." sounds strange to my ears. Instead, I prefer "The hammer need not be large for...". But what is the rule that ...
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3answers
9k views

“Pay attention” vs. “give attention”

Between 'pay' and 'give' I guess you are most likely to choose 'give' for the blank below. However, 'pay' sounds more suited for the second 'attention.' I wonder why. Is it because the second sentence ...
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1answer
32 views

Missing article?

Should there be an article before the word cruelty in the sentence below? Nevertheless, Gandhi knew that cruelty was not the answer and stated, “An eye for an eye will only make the whole world ...
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8answers
316 views

Difference between “buy” and “purchase”

Referencing this answer. Are buy and purchase synonyms in every aspect/context of paying money? What I thought that these terms were unit-based: if you pay for a single unit (1 cigarette or 1 ...
5
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3answers
17k views

“Seem”, “appear”, “look” — how to differentiate?

Are there any significant structural or semantic differences between seem, appear and look in the sense of "to give the impression of being or doing something"? She looks unhappy. He seems ...
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1answer
6k views

Looking forward to “ see” or “seeing”?

Which of the 2 sentences is correct? Sam is looking forward to see the Rocky mountains. Sam is looking forward to seeing the Rocky mountains.
2
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1answer
2k views

The difference between “look at” and “see”

What is the difference between look at and see? For example: Can I look at it? Can I see it? Let's go to look at him. Let's go to see him.
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6answers
5k views

Why is “listen” always followed by “to” in the command voice?

When I say, read it or drink it or take me, there is no to in-between. Why is it that when I use the verb listen, I have to say listen to me or listen to it?
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3answers
3k views

Which of these is the correct usage of the words “listen”, “hear”?

Which of these sentences is correct? Why? You must hear to this song. You must listen to this song. Have you heard to this song? Have you listened to this song?
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6answers
20k views

Do you “watch” a movie or “see” a movie?

Which of the following verbs is most commonly used with movie? Or are they both used, but the connotations are different? I watched a good movie yesterday. I saw a good movie yesterday.
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3answers
556 views

Correct usage of “see” vs. “watch”

I have seen them grow up. I have watched them grow up. Though the intended meaning is conveyed in both sentences, I want to know which in this case is a better fit, see or watch.
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7answers
8k views

Is “architect” a verb and a noun?

I hear the word architect used as a verb in the technical field and now more often in other industries and groups, for example: We need to architect a better solution to the problem. I am ...
4
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0answers
67 views

Why do you write “receive” with “ei” but “retrieve” with “ie”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is it true that “I before E, except after C”? Both words are similar in pronunciation but different in spelling. Why is it that receive is written with ei but ...
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2answers
1k views

The pronunciation of “ate”

I was talking to some friends and I said "I ate (/et/) chocolate yesterday...". Then my friend corrected me: "you ate (/eit/) chocolate...". I repeated my sentence with the /eit/ pronunciation and we ...
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3answers
12k views

Why is the spelling of “pronounce” and “pronunciation” different?

Why is the spelling of pronounce and pronunciation different? If one originally did not know the spelling of pronunciation, one would when hearing it verbally deduce its spelling to be pronounciation, ...
2
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1answer
92 views

Connexion pronunciation & verb

Connexion is the original and variant spelling of "connection", common until at least the 19th century, and still occasionally used in British English (it was the house style of The Times of London ...
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4answers
26k views

When would one use “burnt” and when would “burned” be more appropriate?

More out of curiosity than anything, when would one use "burnt" and when would "burned" be appropriate? For example, This coffee tastes burnt. This coffee tastes burned. or They burnt ...
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2answers
43 views

Being a representative for someone to/against (?) others

I'm currently writing a job applications for customer-centric jobs and I would like to say that "I'm looking forward to being a representative for the wishes and needs of a community of customers to / ...
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2answers
178 views

Distributive adjectives in sentences with non-count nouns

In the following sentence: "Wall and roof thickness are always considered when repairing a chimney." The sentence refers to the thickness of both the wall and the roof. Is the sentence above correct ...
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1answer
94 views

Tricky Past Perfect sentences

I'm having trouble establishing a sequence of events in the following sentences (italicized) and understanding why the past perfect is needed. "Once upon a time, when I was a child reading fairy ...
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2answers
44 views

What is the verb for the action of creating a suggestion?

What is the verb for the action of creating a suggestion? e.g. you have "raise a concern" I don't like to go with "suggest a suggestion", but ok if thats the way to go. Also, what is the correct ...
3
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2answers
355 views

Why are checks cancelled when approved?

A friend of mine just asked if I had paid him back for some money he lent me. I told him the check was cancelled on the 9th. Concerned, he asked, "why'd you cancel the check?" I replied, "I didn't ...
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15 views

When to use -ed or not as part of objective portion of sentence

Which one of the following usage is correct and why? I would like to have the content changed to the following: ... OR I would like to have the content change to the following: ... The ...
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2answers
723 views

Identifying verb types, nouns, adjectives and adverbs in a sentence - 5th grade

While helping my son, who happens to be in the 5th grade, with his English grammar, I have realized that I am confused. The following sentence, that I gave him as an exercise, he has identified the ...
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2answers
51 views

“More than necessary” vs. “more than are necessary”

Don't buy more books than are necessary. Don't buy more books than necessary. We have three more doctors than are necessary. We have three more doctors than necessary. ...
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2answers
146 views

What does 'sanding a doorstep' mean?

What does "sanding a doorstep" mean? Does it mean polishing the doorstep? Or filling it in with sand? I read this expression in Charles Dickens' book, The Haunted House where it says, I found ...
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0answers
22 views

Is a value something to “indicate” the valued thing?

Sorry for the confusing title. I came across the below sentence, and am wondering if the word "indicate" collocates with the word "value" as in this case: The PCS (Print Contrast Signal) is a ...
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3answers
100 views

I recommend vs. I would recommend

I just realized that throughout my life I have interchanged "I recommend that you do X" and "I would recommend that you do X". Is there a difference in their meanings in modern-day usage, or are they ...
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2answers
11k views

“Forgotten” or “forgot” as past participle of “forget”

In US and in UK respectively, which is more popular as the past participle of forget: forgotten or forgot? Which is more formal/informal? Examples: I haven't forgot(ten) you. You will not ...
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2answers
37 views

Best verb to use for formation in strategy formation

I am writing an article about strategy formation and have trouble finding the right verbs. For instance, I would like to say something about the process of forming a strategy but have some serious ...
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0answers
6 views

how to use be and become [migrated]

One day, I'll be a rich person. One day, I'll become a rich person I've have been a rich person. I've become a rich person Can I use become instead of be here.
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1answer
42 views

Which is the most appropriate verb tense and mood for this text?

Access or use of this system without authorization or in excess of authorization either express or implied may subject violators to criminal and civil action. On top of that we would probably ...
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1answer
40 views

Any specific word for refferring and fetching back old data

I am looking for a specific word for referring and fetching some data from old document. e.g "I pull out some points from my documents from last project." I am trying to write something like ...
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2answers
3k views

Does “help” take the preposition “to”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb “help”: with or without “to”? “Help rule out” vs. “help to rule out” ...
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1answer
27 views

In this case, should I use the present progressive as a noun or infinitive as a noun?

"the only internal change McMurphy undergoes is becoming inwardly defeated", or "...to become inwardly defeated"?
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66 views

What are reasons for using Present Continuous instead of Present Simple?

AFAIK, the word "see" cannot appear in Continuous Tenses. But today I have met it in that tense in some text that is obviously not too informal. "Somewhat like the shields created by force fields ...
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2answers
81 views

“The more, the merrier!” — Is this a sentence? If not… what?

Is The more, the merrier! a sentence? It doesn't seem to have a main verb, so I'm inclined to say no, but it certainly functions as a sentence in everyday speech. I can think of three ways of ...
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1answer
47 views

Can a linking verb be transitive?

I found the following example on oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com. This is from the first entry of the verb feel. A pattern 'feel something' is given under this entry, while the verb 'feel' is listed as ...
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1answer
73 views

Meaning of “repay” in “the book repays close study”

What does the word "repay" in essence mean in the phrase "the book repays close study"? My OED defines "repay" as to make return for; requite [a service, action, etc.]... must repay their ...
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2answers
495 views

What is the meaning of the italicized “do” in this sentence?

A child meets this kind of discipline every time he tries to do something, which is why it is so important in school to give children more chances to do things, instead of just reading or ...
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1answer
32 views

Can “tamper” be used transitively?

Consider the following two statements: The file has been tampered with. The file has been tampered. Does the second version make sense, or should it always be "tampered with"?
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5answers
5k views

Would anyone use “ramp down” as the opposite to “ramp up”

In the context, for example, of factory production I often read the phrase "ramp up production" or "a ramp-up in production". To me "ramp down" sounds a strange phrase to use as the opposite - does ...
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0answers
23 views

“Prefer” usage - If the emphasis is on the habit --ing form or to-infinitive? [duplicate]

-ing form : Most people prefer watching a film at the cinema rather than on TV. -to-infinitive form: We prefer to drive during the day whenever we can. Which of the above two sentences ...
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2answers
283 views

Can I use the word “promise” with gerund?

Is it possible to use gerund after the verb "promise"? For example, in the sentence "He promised cleaning the window. I'd prefer to say: He promised to clean the window. But today I was told that this ...
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3answers
64 views

Does “bankroll” mean “cash” if used as a verb?

I was watching the TV show "White Collar" (episode: Forging Bonds). Neal Caffrey is a bond forger. Neal is planning to steal money from a rich man named Adler. Neal needs some money to meet Adler, so ...