Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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Correct Word Usage: “upversion” [closed]

Are "upversion" or "upversioning" "reupversion" "reupversioning" valid words to use? I checked out several dictionaries (MW, OED) but could not find any of them.
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24 views

How to use benefit

I want to make a sentence with benefit. Which form is correct? A gives benefit to B by C A benefit B from C A benefit B with C here: A is what giving benefit B is who receives the benefit C is the ...
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1answer
40 views

Is “rape incidents befell American campuses” alright?

Befall is usually used as a synonym for happen or occur but with a negative connotation. In this sentence, is the use of befell semantically correct? As a matter of fact, the majority of rape ...
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What are valid usages of suggest?

Could anyone clarify once and for all the usage of suggest? All the grammars I have consulted allow for only four possibilities: Suggest + ing form Suggest that + direct object + should + bare ...
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How to refer to something “demanding” which doesn't happen all of a sudden?

Looking for a verb to express something that requires some time and effort to evolve, like collecting. I want to express that collecting requires some time and the collection doesn't just come out ...
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6answers
10k views

Can or should “ask” ever be used as a noun?

"The ask is that you provide me with..." I started hearing "ask" being used as a noun a few years ago. Is this a recent trend? Is it an East Coast thing, unique to North America, or just unique to ...
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11answers
3k views

Sabotaging through purposeful procrastination

In Polish there's a word Kunktatorstwo - trying to achieve own goals through delaying action, e.g. by making the opponent run out of time, making them tire out from keeping their defenses up, or ...
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4answers
578 views

Is it ever correct to use “to English” as a verb?

I've run into this usage several times, in the comments of sites like YouTube, usually as a joke in response to having one's grammar or spelling corrected. To paraphrase: I'll try to English ...
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2answers
278 views

Use of 'swag' as a verb

I came across this post on swag (the slang word): Attempt to swag should ideally be accompanied by apt spellings. I have seen swag being used only as a noun. I know swagger is a verb, but is ...
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11k views

“Awoken” vs. “awaked”

I understand that the verb awake has two different past participle forms, awoken and awaked. Checking Google Ngram I saw that the former has become more popular than the latter in the last century. I ...
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3answers
2k views

Past tense of wake: is there a difference between “waked”, and “woke”?

I just stumbled over the verb "to wake", which according to various sources has two valid forms for the past tense: "woke" and "waked". Some further research stated, that there seem to be two (Old / ...
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2answers
890 views

Company Name as Verb [duplicate]

I am looking for interesting classroom material. Google is both the name of a company and also a verb. Is there a name for this type of verb? Are there any other examples of this type of verb?
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Use of neither with a list of tensed verbs

There are some related tips, but I did not find any one as this. The sentence: 1) he considers himself a healthy person because he does some sport and neither smokes, drinks nor takes drugs ...
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1answer
48 views

To go fade out?

Those sweet memories never seem to go fade out. In trying to find a short synonym for "to become to fade out," I've come up with "to go fade out." Is this idiomatic and grammatically correct? The ...
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4answers
757 views

Seconds has/have passed

Which is proper? The method will be fired after the specified duration of seconds has passed. OR The method will be fired after the specified duration of seconds have passed.
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4answers
126 views

“Ask help/permission/forgiveness” or “Ask FOR help/permission/forgiveness”?

I found some illustrative sentences as below in online-dictionaries (Cambridge and Learner's Dictionary). If you need any help, please don't hesitate to ask. She asked their forgiveness. Why they ...
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2answers
59 views

Explanation of a scene in Shakespeare's Hamlet

It is clear from my question that English is not my first language. I apologize if it sounds dumb. I am trying to understand the structure of the sentences in the following scene of Hamlet: But ...
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5answers
65 views

Correct verb to describe relationships between processes in technical writing

I am writing a thesis, and the tone of my writing is technical. At a few places, I need a specific verb to describe how a particular process/method/technique relates to another ...
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3answers
2k views

“Trawling through” or “trolling through”

There are quite a few discussions online about whether one can "trawl through" or "troll through", looking for something. From what I can see, both are fishing terms so both are legitimate in ...
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3answers
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Are adverbs frowned upon in proper English (academic writing)?

I understand that "proper English" is vague, but what I mean is, are adverbs to be avoided in scholarly writing? For example, let's say that I am wanting to publish an article in scholarly magazine ...
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1answer
172 views

want + object + to-infinitive / v-ing. Subject + want + v-ing

I'm a bit hesitant when using these sentences : I don't want you talking about her. I don't want you to talk about her. This wall wants painting. The students want teaching. As we know the verb ...
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5answers
2k views

Is verbing in “I medalled in volleyball” correct?

Is “I medalled in volleyball” a grammatically correct sentence? According to OED, medal is a verb and a noun. I haven't seen any usage of the word as a verb, but I am assuming the above sentence is ...
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3answers
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“Lifting a ban” — why does “lifting” mean “removing”?

In all other cases "moving something up" means creating or increasing something, like in "rising concern" or "erecting obstacles". At the same time "lifting a ban" means effectively removing the ban. ...
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1answer
66 views

Can I say “listen for it” and “smell for it”?

I often hear the term to look for it: "I have studied symbolism in fine arts for years, and now I see symbolism in everything. I just can't stop myself after I learned how to look for it." Feel ...
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1answer
52 views

Default position of a switch

Which version is correct? Move all switches into their default positions. Put all switches into their default positions. Switch all switches into their default positions. Bring all switches into ...
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3answers
389 views

Is it grammatically sound to group nouns/verbs sharing a preposition that governs the same object using an “and” multiple times in one sentence?

For example, does the following sentence violate any grammar rules? "Global Connections" will be showcasing internship opportunities, job openings and training programs at, challenges and issues ...
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32 views

Is a value something to “indicate” the valued thing?

Sorry for the confusing title. I came across the following sentence and am wondering if the word "indicate" collocates with the word "value" as in this case: The PCS (Print Contrast Signal) is a ...
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1answer
300 views

Verb agreement in the sentence

I suspect my verbs do NOT agree =) In the following sentence, I'm trying to say that I've asked this girl out for drinks in the past. However, every time I'd ask, she would agree at first and later ...
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1answer
125 views

“Flatly denied that he had copied” vs. “flatly denied the charges that he had copied”

The student flatly denied that he had copied in the examination hall. That sentence is not correct, I found that it must be "flatly denied the charges that". Am I thinking in the right ...
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2answers
578 views

Is “nothing but birds and a few insects” singular or plural?

Nothing but birds and a few insects [was/were] to be seen. In that sentence, should the verb agree with "nothing" or with "birds and a few insects"?
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6answers
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“Take a rest” or “have some rest”?

Which one of the these is the correct, or can I use both? take a rest have some rest Or is there any better way to say that?
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2answers
1k views

“They knew what mercy is” vs. “they knew what mercy was”

They knew what mercy is. They knew what mercy was. Mercy is something that always exists so can I say is as in the quoted example?
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55 views

Devoid and Lack

I often found it hard to use "devoid" naturally and correctly. And most of the times it seems to me that replacing "devoid" by "lacking" sounds more natural. The question is lacking meaning The ...
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11answers
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Is there a word for lowering the importance of something by summarizing it?

Often times someone will tell a long winded story, and then someone will reply with something like "So basically you just had a bad day." Another, I think better example is when someone will talk a ...
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3answers
102 views

Word that indicates that you played an important role, but were not the leader

Is there a word that is somewhere between "participated in" and "led?" For example, last year my company created a new team and assigned me to lead it. I contributed significantly to the formation of ...
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80 views

What Do You Call It when a Noun is Used as a Verb?

Like "Petition": I signed a 'petition,' and carried it onward to 'petition' for support of lower wages & more suffering etc.
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37 views

use “establish” or “establishing”? and why? [closed]

The struggle for women's rights—the rights that establish the same social, economic, political status for women as for men—began with 18th century during a period known as the Age of ...
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3answers
67 views

Meaning of the phrasal verb “divert from”

In this sentence here, do you think diverted from means distracted from or change of course? The second option doesn't seem to make much sense, though. “When the imperial mantle finally falls on ...
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2answers
63 views

Intransitive or transitive

As the common definition runs, an intransitive verb doesn't need an object as in "I run in the street." But my question is why some verbs are labeled intransitive, and at the same time,they take a ...
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2answers
87 views

Why don't we say: “The shop is opened”? [duplicate]

Why do we write "The shop is open" and not "The shop is opened"? The passive voice is formed this way: verb + ed. On the other hand, we write "The shop is closed".
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Past tense of 'to output': output or outputted?

According to Wikipedia, the past tense (and past participle) of the verb to output is either output or outputted. Are these two forms entirely interchangeable? Or do they have certain nuance in ...
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1answer
31 views

“Enact” (verb) - Phrase used

I just joined the english.stackexchange.com and I am thrilled to meet you all! I have a question to pose concerning the use of the verb "enact". I would like to know how do we use this verb to ...
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1answer
34 views

Can “obsess over” have a positive connotation?

I would like to use the verb "obsess over" in this sentence: "Being interested in classical architecture I have always obsessed over Italy." Does this verb have a positive connotation or does it ...
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1answer
52 views

Verb for “make [object] available”

I have a feeling that I am overlooking a common word, but which word should I use to say that "I will make myself available for you tomorrow" or convey similar thoughts? The word is not "avail" ...
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1answer
43 views

Which verb describes the most hate for something/someone? [closed]

I'm curious to know which word describes the most (maximum or most extreme) hate for something. For example let's say I really hate the educational system or american politics. I can say: I hate ...
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2answers
53 views

Intransitive use of the verb “reduce”

I know that the verb “reduce”, which is often followed by an object, can also be used intransitively, as dictionaries show very clearly. What I am unsure of, however, is whether “reduce” could ...
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0answers
102 views

Early Modern English second person present tense when verb ends with st

In EModE you normally would add -st or -est to verbs to conjugate them to the second person singular indicative tense (past and present), but what do you do for verbs that already end in -st or -est? ...
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Should I use past tense when I'm asked to describe a picture?

If you are being asked to describe a picture, what tense would you use?
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55 views

I demand they do… / I demand them to…

According to practically every grammar I've encountered, "I demanded them to leave" is incorrect English. I've quite literally spoken like this all my life; I don't know if it's a dialectal thing (I'm ...
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“so close to doing” vs “about to do” [duplicate]

In the phrase "I was about to do", the verb "do" is used in the infinitive. In the phrase "I was so close to doing", the verb "do" is used in the present participle. Why the difference?