Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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If someone is electrocuted, do they have to die or can they just be injured?

Is it correct to say I electrocuted my friend if he was only injured by electricity?
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0answers
34 views

Have vs Have been

If Jim had taken Sandra to a romantic film, she wouldn't have been so frightened. If I hadn't missed the train, I wouldn't have been late. If she had known the address, she would have been able to ...
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0answers
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Antonym for “infix” (“outfix”?)

infix: implant or insert firmly in something, as in the particles of mercury will infix themselves in the structure of the other metal How about the opposite? Is there something called outfix? I.e. ...
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2answers
77 views

I sent … vs. I have sent … vs. I had sent you an email already [closed]

Which of the following sentences are correct? If all of them are correct, what are their different meanings? I sent you an email already. I have sent you an email already. I had sent you an email ...
2
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4answers
44 views

hiccup-like noise made while trying to speak when stabbed?

Say someone was stabbed and he bleeds but he remains conscious. Axiomatically if he were to speak he would speak with extreme difficulty. What do you call the hiccup-like noise/sound he makes while ...
2
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1answer
57 views

Dropping the 'ing'

I always remember many verbs ending in .....ing Swimming club/cap and shaving foam for example. I now see increased use of swim club and shave foam. Why has this happened, is it correct use of English ...
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2answers
53 views

Can't answer a question in arguments [closed]

If two people are debating, and one of them asked the other person a question and he got confused and couldn't answer this question. But he is impressed with this question. Is there any verb ...
0
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2answers
50 views

had vs. had had [duplicate]

What are the different meanings of the following sentences? I had had too many chocolates, so I was too full to eat dinner yesterday. I had too many chocolates, so I was too full to eat dinner ...
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1answer
21 views

They have been vs. they will have been

What are the different meaning int the following sentences? They have been dating for a year now. They will have been dating for a year now.
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0answers
14 views

“had” use in past perfect tense [duplicate]

I called her, but she had already left for the day. I was taught that past perfect tense is used to describe an action before another action in the past. However, look at the following setntece: ...
8
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2answers
11k views

What's the practical difference between “allot” and “allocate”?

I've noticed allot is usually used as an adjective (as in, "your allotted amount"), and allocate is more often used as a verb (as in, "I will allocate some resources"). Any other notable differences?
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0answers
48 views

Should we always use a prepositional object after an intransitive verb?

I arrived at home. vs. I arrived home. "Arrive" is an intransitive verb and it needs a prepositional object, but 'home' is an adverb of place and I don't think any preposition can be used ...
2
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1answer
39 views

clad as an active verb?

I've been spending some time on a home repair forum and I keep coming across the word clad used in the imperative or present tense active form. E.g. Clad your home in brick. He clads his home in ...
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1answer
47 views

Using (be) as a main verb in this form (be) without using auxiliary verbs, is it possible?

There's no doubt that "Be happy." and "Don't be sad." are correct. But "They be happy" is incorrect. "They are happy" "Are they happy?" "They aren't happy" "Aren't they happy?" "Why aren't they ...
0
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2answers
670 views

Two past perfect verbs in the same sentence

Both these sentences contain two verbs (correct me if I'm wrong) that are in the past perfect tense. I'd like to ask how do they occur in chronological order. Though my question is related to the one ...
2
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1answer
227 views

“Increase 10%” or “increase by 10%”

I was taught at the university that the correct usage of this verb is increase by, for example, like in the sentences stated below: The company's income increased by 10%. By 2015 the ...
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0answers
27 views

Tricky Subject Verb Agreement Examples [duplicate]

One of the people has or One of the people have gone? I would use 'One of the people has gone', but I am not really sure if it's redundant to use that these days. Please help.
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2answers
79 views

Does the verb 'to provide' collocate with the word 'feature'?

In a computer science report, is it correct to say the following sentence: A certain package provides multiple features. In other words, does the verb to provide collocate with the word feature? ...
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0answers
29 views

What's the proper verb to describe quantitative research?

What would be the proper verb for an action that measures with numbers something that used to be measured qualitatively? I mean the verb for converting quality to quantity. For example: Fornel ...
0
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2answers
7k views

As well as + verb-ing

I am a bit unsure about putting a verb in the "ing" form when it follows "as well as". Can somebody please explain which one (A or B) is grammatically correct and which one sounds more natural? A. ...
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1answer
20 views

Descriptions of frequency versus present tense

Is there ever a difference between descriptions of frequency and the present tense? For example, is there a difference between "I speak English." (referring to frequent speaking of English) and "I ...
0
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2answers
50 views

Widow, Widowed; Widower, What? [closed]

A woman who loses her husband is a widow; she is widowed. A man who loses his wife is a widower. Is there an equivalent male term for widowed?
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1answer
37 views

Is it was or were? [closed]

Which one is here correct? "...the employment rate of women were/was always higher.... I think it is was but women is plural so it has to be were, or?! Thanks
2
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3answers
56 views

“The prevalence of both X & Y increased with age, and * especially high in subgroup.” Was/were?

The prevalence of both diabetes and obesity increased with age, and * especially high in ≥65-year-olds. Should * be was/were? A professional language checker left my usage of "were" in one ...
0
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1answer
36 views

'represented for' wrong usage?

Can someone please confirm that the grammar in this video is off. It's supposedly a teaser video for a new product from a Chinese company. https://youtube.com/watch?v=CfgviCjtvg0 Shouldn't ...
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1answer
149 views

Tense of verb after conjunction

Jumping straight into my question, consider these two sentences: He had finished the recitation and closed the book. He had finished the recitation and had closed the book. Which of the above two ...
3
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1answer
61 views

Deadlines as instants or periods with various verbs and tenses

I was wondering whether a deadline is more of an instant or more of a period. It seems to have some of both aspects, but with more of an emphasis on the instant. I thought that this should be ...
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1answer
147 views

Do I have to repeat a verb before and after “and”?

I am writing an essay and I am stuck with this sentence The citizens cast their votes choosing Mark as president and choosing me as vice-president. is this correct or should it be The ...
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1answer
29 views

A word that describes the act of running a company [closed]

Is there a word that describes the act of running a company? Preferably a single word.
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2answers
2k views

“In the case of” or “In case of”

I am wondering whether "in the case of" is a correct expression. I know "in case of" can be used, for example "In case of an emergency" but when would be appropriate to use "in the case of" as long as ...
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1answer
131 views

Usage of “coruscating”

Can coruscating be used as a one word adjective to describe "interesting and exciting"? Basically the usage is "his interesting and exciting research work" which will end up as "his coruscating ...
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2answers
63 views

comma between subject and verb

'Apples, oranges, kiwis, etc., are possible fruits to eat in this country.' 'Apples, oranges, kiwis, etc., all are possible fruits to eat in this country.' 'Apples, oranges, kiwis, etc. are possible ...
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0answers
28 views

The Correct Version of a Sentence

Is this sentence correct - "In his entire life, Gerald has given more emphasis to money than does John." or We need - "In his entire life, Gerald has given more emphasis to money than has John."
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0answers
21 views

parallelism in linking verbs and verbs

Is the following sentence parallel? "He was young, wore expensive clothing, and had good facial features." Isn't "was" in this sentence a linking verb and thus a verb making the whole sentence ...
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8answers
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“To science the sh*t out of something”

In The Martian movie, Matt Damon (Watney), when left stranded on Mars with very limited resources to survive, says: Mark Watney: In the face of overwhelming odds, I'm left with only one option, ...
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2answers
131 views

Does the “she was found in violation of…” <-> “she was violated” equivalence have a name?

This is a follow-up to this question: Why is "violated" being used as future perfect with a person as the object? At that question, it was established that there is a jargon/slang usage of ...
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3answers
7k views

Verb for “to make bold”

Consider the following: Imagine that you are sitting at your word processor and you need to make a word bold. Imagine that you are sitting at your word processor and you need to bold a word. ...
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4answers
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verb - Is there a word for 'de-acknowledging'?

Is there a singular word for the act of 'de-acknowledging' or 'removing an acknowledgement'. For context: I am creating a computer program with a list of issues. Issues can be acknowledged. But these ...
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1answer
66 views

verb + direction/location - is there a name for this common combination?

Apologies if this is off topic or has been answered before, but I can't find the answer to my question. We commonly encounter verbs that have a direction/location added to them to change the meaning, ...
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2answers
61 views

“results” vs “is resultant from”

So there I am, reading, when I hit this sentence: Repeated studies have shown that having excess body fat, type 2 diabetes and weight gain are resultant from eating and storing more calories than ...
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0answers
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is there a name for adjectives that end in -ive formed from verbs?

Examples include 'declarative', 'manipulative', 'accusative'. Is there a name for these adjectives that describe something of or related to their base verb?
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1answer
2k views

Why not “skydove”?

In having a conversation with some friends, I noted that I decided at one point to forgo an option that I had at hand. Since I was speaking in the past, I had to put it in the correct tense. I knew ...
0
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1answer
110 views

Present Simple vs Present Continuous

I was doing some exercises and I stumbled upon something that isn't very clear to me. I have to fill in the gaps and explain why I use Simple Present or Present Continuous. I (to be) furious with ...
2
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3answers
4k views

“Regress” vs. “retrogress”

What do each of them mean exactly? Is either (or both) the opposite of "progress"? Could someone please explain the difference? To add some context: When I look up the definitions I see the ...
2
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2answers
44 views

Using “to start” as a ditransitive verb

In the Song I Started a Joke by The Bee Gees (I recommend watching this cover – it's amazing), the lyrics contain phrases like […] which started the whole world crying […] This seems to be ...
2
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2answers
71 views

Is there a word for salivating in response to negative stimuli, as opposed to positive stimuli?

Like when you smell a dead rat your mouth produces saliva and makes you spit a lot. Or when you see something gross, doesn't make you vomit, but your mouth waters you spit a lot.
3
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1answer
291 views

Early Modern English second person present tense when verb ends with ‑st

In Early Modern English you normally would add ‑st or ‑est to verbs to conjugate them to the second person singular indicative tense (past and present), but what do you do for verbs that already end ...
0
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1answer
37 views

“Trivially translate” vs. “translate trivally” — which is corrent?

Which one is correct? Do both sentences have the same meaning? The table definition does not trivially translate to the underlying data structures. The table definition does not translate ...
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0answers
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'lead to someone doing something' OR 'lead to someone's doing something'

Under the entry lead (v.), Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English (5th edition) lists: lead to someone doing something example: His actions could lead to him losing his job. However, ...