Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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3
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4answers
831 views

Do you “hit” or “press” a button?

I am currently writing an user manual for a software tool, providing step-by-step usage instructions. I am aware that pressing a button is a perfectly fine expression. However, I'm trying to find ...
1
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1answer
76 views

Do we plan a strategy?

Is it grammatically correct to say : "He planned a strategy".
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2answers
144 views

When must a gerund be preceded by a possessive pronoun as opposed to an accusative one?

I was recently reading this very interesting post here: When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun? In this thread, it is argued persuasively that we could use either his or ...
6
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5answers
4k views

Why do we “roll” the car windows down, instead of “slide”

Rolling implies rotation and translation. Cranking implies the motion people used to do before power windows and Sliding is what actually happens to the window. When and why did people start using ...
0
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1answer
40 views

Proper usage of “engendered”

"His actions engendered a revolution in the Capitol." This sounds a bit off to me. But going by the dictionary meaning, this is legal and correct. Is this correct in terms of readability and ...
4
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2answers
43k views

Which is correct: “confirm with somebody” or “confirm to somebody”?

I want to talk to someone and make sure something is done. How to express this meaning using the word confirm? I'm not sure whether it should be confirm to sb or confirm with sb. Is there another way ...
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0answers
32 views

Help finding the verb

This may be easy for you but I wanted to poll the experts. In the following sentence, is 'loved' a verb? 'Something loved by all gods is pious.'
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1answer
49 views

The previous text (has not | does not | not) written correctly [closed]

I have a simple sentence, but I have some confusion on it. What is the correct choice and why ? The previous text (has not | does not | not | something else) written correctly. I choose "has ...
0
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2answers
280 views

Two past perfect verbs in the same sentence

Both these sentences contain two verbs (correct me if I'm wrong) that are in the past perfect tense. I'd like to ask how do they occur in chronological order. Though my question is related to the one ...
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2answers
37 views

adding -er to a verb

Can you add -er to any verb to make a real and accepted word? ...word in question is Yelper. I realize that it is a hunting tool- but the questioning party insists that it's proper to add -er to the ...
0
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1answer
41 views

a number of children has gone to school or have gone to school [duplicate]

Please help, in this sentence is "a number" an attribute or the subject of the sentence?
24
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3answers
4k views

What is the difference between “lay” and “lie”?

How do I know when to use lay and when to use lie, and what are the different forms of each verb? I'm always getting them confused.
1
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2answers
113 views

Past Simple and Progressive; depending on the sentence?

My question is based on Past Simple and Past Progressive. I had a test a couple weeks ago, and there was this sentence with 2 verbs that you had to choose one to make the sentence true grammatically: ...
0
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1answer
48 views

Lie or lay dead? [duplicate]

The context is "The mercenaries lie/lay dead." "The animal lies/lays dead." It's present tense and there's a corpse involved. I've looked it up elsewhere and I just don't understand the ...
0
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1answer
25 views

“negotiating a retirement” what is the meaning of “negotiating” here [closed]

Full sentence => "Not only did Chin Shih plunder boats, she defeated the British, Chinese and Portuguese natives, before negotiating a long and wealthy retirement for herself"
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5answers
7k views

What is the difference between “anticipate” and “expect”?

My understanding is the following: I anticipate everyone will come here by 10. = "I hope it's gonna happen, but I'm not so sure about the result". I expect everyone will come here by 10. = ...
0
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2answers
6k views

Grammaticality of “I am worrying” and how it compares to “I am worried” and “I worry”

This question is about worried about vs. worrying about. I think "being worried about someone/something" is more usual than "worry about", isn't it? Can I use the progressive aspect for ongoing ...
1
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0answers
23 views

Not much has/have changed [duplicate]

Which of the above is correct? I am in a dilemma which one is correct. I have an inkling that has is right.
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2answers
91 views

verb tense in reported speech

I told Cindy we would not be able to eat American Chinese food again for a couple of years, once we moved to Shanghai. I told Cindy we would not be able to eat American Chinese food again for ...
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8answers
127 views

What is the verb for earning money though bad ways or illegal? [duplicate]

How to say if a person earns lot of money especially in a bad ways or through illegal business. I want to know the verb of earning money through illegally and how can we call such a person.
2
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1answer
80 views

What's the proper and formal way of asking “Didn't we used to do …”? [duplicate]

I saw it used in an article online, and it doesn't seem proper to me because of the two past tenses used together. But since "use to" can't be used here, I don't know what would be the proper way. ...
0
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2answers
31 views

“that enables vs. enabling”

I'm describing an app. The sentence is X is an app that enables you to do Y I think it doesn't sound really well. Would X is an app enabling you to do Y be better? Is this form OK at ...
3
votes
4answers
558 views

“Practice amp” or “practise amp”? [closed]

I'm rather confused as to whether you say I have a practise amp or I have a practice amp when referring to an amplifier that you use to practise your guitar playing. I understand that the verb form ...
2
votes
7answers
114 views

what word means to hint at something bad or negative

I need to know the word that has the meaning "to hint at something bad or negative" because my friend said to find the word for it. I've tried to go on Google but it hasn't worked, so I need your help ...
0
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1answer
99 views

Is food “spitted” or “sprinkled”?

Be careful. Don't bump the waiter holding the food. Otherwise hot food will be spitted/sprinkled over you. Which is the most appropriate and common verb? What is the difference in meaning between ...
2
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1answer
64 views

What's the difference between these two sentences?

Health facilities reported 1000 people killed and 3000 wounded since March 19. Health facilities reported that 1000 people were killed and 3000 were wounded since March 19. Isn't 'killed' ...
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2answers
2k views

Use of “manifest” as an active verb

Recently I completed an English creative writing exam in which I used the phrase files and papers manifest, as if by some unholy magic at the tray on his desk. My teacher stated that my use of ...
5
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3answers
3k views

Infinitive without to: The first thing I do is open my eyes

I have not been able to find an explanation for this use of an infinitive without to: The first thing I do in the morning is go to the bathroom. The first thing I do in the morning is open my ...
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7answers
627 views

OED Appeals: Origin of “bimble”

The OED has made a public appeal for help in tracing the history of some English words, including: bimble verb earlier than 1983 The word bimble, meaning ‘to move at a leisurely pace’, ...
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9answers
11k views

Is “architect” a verb and a noun?

I hear the word architect used as a verb in the technical field and now more often in other industries and groups, for example: We need to architect a better solution to the problem. I am ...
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1answer
46 views

Use of Present Participle

I am trying to understand how to interpret the meaning of the following sentence, John arrived late to the airport, causing him to miss his flight I know that the present participle modifies the ...
0
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1answer
56 views

How to refer to something “demanding” which doesn't happen all of a sudden?

Looking for a verb to express something that requires some time and effort to evolve, like collecting. I want to express that collecting requires some time and the collection doesn't just come out ...
10
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3answers
1k views

Correct usage of the verb “to hock”

Sometimes I read/hear the verb "to hock" used as a synonym of "peddle/hawk", as in "The street vendor hocked his wares." Is that correct? I always thought that "to hock" meant "to pawn". Perhaps it's ...
0
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4answers
67 views

Teaching vs Training

I think training mostly refers to the physical related process as it used frequently in sport context, however I found instances in which verb teaching is used in such situations. Am I right? and is ...
3
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7answers
1k views

What word describes the process of a ship being slowly “swallowed” in the sea?

Trying to find a word which will describe the slow process of the absorption of a ship by the sea. Metaphysical words are also welcome. Sea water swallowed the ship.
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3answers
12k views

Is 'quantitate' a synonym for 'quantify' or just a misnomer?

I have always used quantify, but have been encountering quantitate more and more in scientific literature. Is quantitate a "valid" verb and a synonym for quantify? Otherwise is there a subtle ...
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2answers
55 views

May and might: which one to use

I found many information online on "might" and "may" and it sounds like most of the time we can use both of them, interchangeably. However in this quiz, it seems like if only one of the two is ...
14
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12answers
3k views

A verb meaning “to look around making sure no one sees you”

Imagine a group of people trying to rob a safe, or two people having sex where they should not. Afraid of being caught, they look around every few seconds to make sure no one sees them. Is there one ...
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1answer
89 views

What’s the difference between determine something and determine on something?

I am uncertain about the terms "determine [something]" and "determine on [something]." These words seem to have similar meanings, but possibly with different connotations. Consider this example: ...
2
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3answers
91 views

Difference between “attempt” and “try”

As far as I understand, both "attempt" and "try" describe active measures towards achieving a goal. Words like "aim", "seek" are listed as synonyms, but seem not to indicate active measures. What is ...
84
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11answers
49k views

How many tenses are there in English?

Do we have 16 tenses in English? With future present past future in the past in these forms simple continuous perfect perfect continuous Can we manipulate these together to create English ...
48
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9answers
4k views

Is “rather” shifting to become a verb?

In colloquial English, I constantly run across sentences of the form: I rather my [noun] [verb] A quick Google search returns tons of examples: I rather my opponents don't find out. I ...
3
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2answers
53 views

Felicitated- pragmatics and connotations

This sentence from a major Indian daily amused me: The mother of a Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) constable, who died in the line of duty in Jammu and Kashmir, was felicitated at the 65th ...
4
votes
9answers
361 views

Is there a verb for making a statement/sentence milder or “dumbing it down”?

Is there a verb which means the same as "to dumb down" or "to make milder", in relation to an account of something I had witnessed? More specifically, a verb which describes telling your account of ...
7
votes
6answers
284 views

Is “door” the direct object of “The cat ran out the door”?

My friend and I got into a heated discussion about direct objects. While we both understand what they are and how they work, we got stuck on a random sentence that I blurted out. Now, if I say: ...
10
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1answer
9k views

“Broadcast” or “broadcasted”

I'm not a native English speaker, so sorry if this is a very basic question. Is broadcast a verb? If it is, what is the simple past and past participle: broadcasted?
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2answers
2k views

Present perfect tense with the verb 'is'

I would like to know how to use the verb to be and its past participle. For example: The rain is gone. Is is present perfect tense here?
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2answers
108 views

Make it quick or quickly? [closed]

Do I say make it quickly or quick when referring to doing something fast?
0
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2answers
73 views

There was a rumor + is/was

Could anyone tell me that if the sentence "There was a rumor that Citibank is in debt." is grammatically correct ? Please advise me. Some say it is correct while others say it is ungrammatical. I'm ...
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1answer
67 views

There is 80 years or there are 80 years? [closed]

Which one should I use? Do I use plural form of are since there is more than one year?