Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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Two past perfect verbs in the same sentence

Both these sentences contain two verbs (correct me if I'm wrong) that are in the past perfect tense. I'd like to ask how do they occur in chronological order. Though my question is related to the one ...
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2answers
61 views

Direct object before indirect object

In this article on the changes in English grammar the author says: How untrammelled the English passive is, may be seen in the fact that, not content with a construction like “A book was given ...
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When should I use “to do” and “to doing”

folks Here are two sentences that I find difficult to understand the grammar during my reading. Last year, two of her ministers suggested that convicted tycoons be pardoned if they could contribute ...
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49 views

What verb akin to “refine” more clearly describes improving a skill that somebody is already good at?

What other verbs can be used to say "refine analytical skills"? I found "polished" and "sharpen," but I am interested in something better if there are any. The verb shouldn't indicate weak skills, but ...
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4answers
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The opposite of archive

A colleague and I are writing some software and we're looking for some advice on the usage of the word "archive". Currently, we're using archive as a marker to state that the entry in our database has ...
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2answers
72 views

Is there a way to noun a prepositional verb phrase?

I'm not precisely sure how to ask this. I can turn certain verb phrases into nouns, and they sound good. The major reason to do this would be facetiousness but the grammatical aspect intrigues me. ...
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2answers
123 views

Past Simple and Progressive; depending on the sentence?

My question is based on Past Simple and Past Progressive. I had a test a couple weeks ago, and there was this sentence with 2 verbs that you had to choose one to make the sentence true grammatically: ...
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2answers
150 views

Is “a group” singular or plural?

I was wondering what number the verb 'to snowboard' should take in the following sentence: A group of men, led by Olympic athlete John Rider, snowboard(s) down the gently sloping hills. Because ...
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1answer
37 views

Using “Get” with another verb [duplicate]

Are there any special rules for using "get/got" with another verb? Sometimes i feel, i overuse the word "Get/Got". e.g do the following sentences mean the same thing? (1) Internet "get ...
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4answers
67 views

Word(s) that emphasize or magnify the separator rather than the separated

One can say, “Trees separated by fences”, or “Posts split by comments”; or use the active, “Fences separate the trees” and “Comments split the posts”. The mind's eye may see posts with the first ...
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verb tense in reported speech

I told Cindy we would not be able to eat American Chinese food again for a couple of years, once we moved to Shanghai. I told Cindy we would not be able to eat American Chinese food again for ...
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Negative Questions:

You have a large house. Negative question= Don't you have a large house? Saying ''Haven't you a large house?'' is wrong am i correct? But is ''Haven't you got a large house?'' correct or wrong?
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“what are the intentions of this girl” or “what the intentions of this girl are”

I am writing an essay. Can you help me with the order of words. "Even though it is not clear what are the intentions of this girl with respect to this boy, he is totally deluded and wants to buy ...
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1answer
61 views

Is “There was a herd of cattle eating grass” a valid sentence?

This is just a simple question, but I was wondering about this. I would think "herd" is the subject here, and since a herd can't eat (only an individual cow can), would I need to rearrange this ...
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1answer
49 views

Is it grammatical to indicate possession to objects using the verb “to have”?

I was taught that "objects don't own anything", so I couldn't say that "the city has many great pubs". Instead, I had to use "there are many great pubs in the city". Was I taught right, ...
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9answers
683 views

Verb for doing something unknowingly

I cannot think of an effective verb that would suggest someone is doing something unknowingly yet doing it nonetheless - almost like acquiescing. I have thought of 'sleepwalking' however there must be ...
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0answers
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Verb Categories

What is the term for verbs whose action is to take the shape of a particular object? Example: 'arch' The cat arched its back. The action of the verb is to reshape the cat's back into the form of an ...
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3answers
322 views

A verb that gives a very close meaning to stubborn?

You're arguing with someone and they just refuse to give in to the truth, even though you just have this inkling that they're aware of the truth. They're just so opinionated and unyielding. I usually ...
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2answers
76 views

Does it make sense to say “plummets upward”?

According to Google, the word "plummet" means "fall or drop straight down at high speed." So, if I want to say that something quickly shoots upward, would "plummet upward" make sense, or sound normal ...
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Antonym of “to telescope”

The verb "to telescope" conveys in a picturesque way the meaning that an elongated object slides into itself, so that it becomes smaller. I'm looking for an equally attractive verb to convey the ...
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1answer
57 views

Use of Present Participle

I am trying to understand how to interpret the meaning of the following sentence, John arrived late to the airport, causing him to miss his flight I know that the present participle modifies the ...
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2answers
2k views

When to use “use” and when to use “utilize” in a sentence?

Sometimes I go through articles and find the expression utilize, I've always been wondering if there are special cases in which it should be used instead of used. Also because google ngram clearly ...
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1answer
64 views

How to refer to something “demanding” which doesn't happen all of a sudden?

Looking for a verb to express something that requires some time and effort to evolve, like collecting. I want to express that collecting requires some time and the collection doesn't just come out ...
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1answer
72 views

US English use of 'motivate'

In US English, is it acceptable to use the word 'motivate' in the following context? We motivated the decisions regarding... I believe that it is OK in South Africa but not in the UK.
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1answer
44 views

comma to set off two verbs/phrases with different prepositions

If I write a sentence that makes use of two verbs each relying on a different preposition, is it advisable to add commas to structure the sentence and to guide the reader, or is it not necessary (or ...
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Synonym with positive connotation for “peeping through the door”

She peeped through the door asking for permission to enter. Does peeped through have a negative connotation? If so, is there a better word or phrase to be used in such context?
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Unusual example of past and present combination [closed]

I understand past and present can often appear in the same sentence, but I have one example that's bothering me. In a past tense work of fiction, should the line be: That's when I noticed what ...
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1answer
42 views

Verbal compounds such as come-to-be, come-to-know, come-to-X

Reading about intellectual history and the history of natural science, I have very often come across the expression to come-to-be as a synonym for to come into being, to start to exist, to originate, ...
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2answers
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plain form of seem or past participle? [closed]

I was wondering, can you say ''You could have seemed [...]'', like... you didn't seem too intelligent but you could have seemed so had you quoted... Cioran, for example. I'm yet to encounter this form ...
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Central Pennsylvanian English speakers: what are the limitations on the “needs washed” construction?

In the Central Pennsylvania dialect of English (and possibly elsewhere), the following construction is possible: This car needs washed. (=needs to be washed) The room needs cleaned. (=needs ...
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2answers
55 views

What is the difference between explicate and expound?

I googled it and got the following answer: As verbs the difference between explicate and expound is that explicate is to explain meticulously or in great detail; to elucidate; to analyze while ...
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1answer
17k views

'There seem' or 'there seems' + usage of the word 'seem'

First, I have a question "How words 'seem' and 'there' are used together?" Which is correct: There seem ... or There seems ... Then, I'm am interested in general constructions with the word ...
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2answers
126 views

Is there a verb that means to write in calligraphy?

There are several different verbs that deal with handwriting. Write, Handwrite, sketch, draw... then there is Type, key-in... etc. Is there a verb that means to write in calligraphy? I have thought ...
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4answers
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To make something become rare

Is there a (formal register) verb meaning "to make something become rare"? In context, I would like to say "The new software will make instances/situations where you have to manually update database ...
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4answers
26k views

Difference between “get” and “take”

What is the difference between "get" and "take"? Both are used to describe receiving something. By intuition I mostly guess which one to use, but would like to know some rule which will stick in my ...
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2answers
111 views

Use of neither with a list of tensed verbs

There are some related tips, but I did not find any one as this. The sentence: 1) he considers himself a healthy person because he does some sport and neither smokes, drinks nor takes drugs ...
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1answer
38 views

problem with tenses [duplicate]

i have problem with the tense of this sentence: i would like to work as doctor when i finish my degree. maybe i should use it like this: i would like to work as doctor when i am finishing ...
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0answers
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Is there a verb for 'to make negative'? [duplicate]

If I am instructing someone to make a number negative, is there a verb I can use? Negitivise? Negify? Negate, for me, does not work as this is to cancel out, rather than turn a number into the ...
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2answers
34 views

Verb in context: singular or plural?

I have this sentence: The thought of her commotion, and the hope that the neighbors heard her, gives her enough strength to push the door open. Is the singular verb gives correct here? I ...
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1answer
36 views

I have confusion in using present and past tenses in writing about history of english literature.please this for me [closed]

American literature is also divided into periods for convenience because of its common traits and characteristics. Naturally, the first phase of American literature is of colonial literature. This ...
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6answers
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Verb or noun for - when I am not short of words but unable to speak lucidly

A situation when I am not short of words but confused by the setting. the situation does not let me speak properly/lucidly. I kind of trip over my words. I don't know what to do. The silence was ...
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optional backshifting confusion [duplicate]

In reported speech tenses are generally back shifted. But if what was said is still true at the time of reporting then back shifting of tenses is optional. My question is if someone doesn't back ...
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0answers
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Using to + gerund and to + invinitive [duplicate]

"I go to school" Because 'to' is a preposition then is it correct to write "I go to watching the movie"? If not, please explain why. Thank you.
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1answer
82 views

a word for 'blbbhlbl'

is there a word for the sound made at 2:19 of this video? An interjection will also do
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1answer
35 views

Can “ were known” be considered as a copular verb?

I have to analyze the valency pattern of this clause "These glorious full colour prints that resulted were known as brocade pictures". Can I consider "were known" as a copular verb followed by the ...
3
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1answer
81 views

“Have you ever been to … when …” versus “Did you ever go to … when … ?”

Here are two sentences patterns: Have you ever been to the opera when you lived in Milan? and Did you ever go to the opera when you lived in Milan? What is the difference between them? ...
4
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1answer
57 views

Do fish smell or taste blood in water?

Which is the right verb to use? Is smelling as a verb strictly connected with air or what fish do is also called smelling? I ruled out "detect" as it sounds too formal, or is it?
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2answers
503 views

”We're looking forward to helping you find X” vs “We look forward to help you find X” etc

I’m trying to link the following items into a single sentence: we look forward to help you find X So for example, here are some ways I was thinking of doing that: We look forward to help you ...
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9answers
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Difference between “buy” and “purchase”

Referencing this answer. Are buy and purchase synonyms in every aspect/context of paying money? What I thought that these terms were unit-based: if you pay for a single unit (1 cigarette or 1 ...