Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being.

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Difference between inculcate and indoctrinate?

I was curious about the difference between to inculcate and to indoctrinate? Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks.
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Why does impugn = oppugn?

Their definitions look the same—impugn vs. oppugn—yet they have different prefixes. Why don't they have opposite meanings? Would someone please explain this discrepancy?
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“vest” as a phrasal verb

Rather than memorising the definitions, how could I intuit and rationalise them: vest in somebody/something = to belong to somebody/something legally. vest something in somebody = to give somebody ...
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98 views

Is it correct to say “John helps you talk with people”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb "help": with or without "to"? Sorry if this is a stupid question, but English is not my first language. For me ...
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Do you “watch” a movie or “see” a movie?

Which of the following verbs is most commonly used with movie? Or are they both used, but the connotations are different? I watched a good movie yesterday. I saw a good movie yesterday.
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I will drive into town… but I can't drive

My girlfriend messaged me earlier to say "I will drive into town with my mother". I thought this was odd, since she doesn't have a licence. Turns out she meant that her mother will be driving, and she ...
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29 views

'Make' vs. 'makes' in “this makes” and “this does make”? [duplicate]

In English grammar, to my understanding, it is incorrect to say "this does makes," but I'm not sure why (and nor does my mother, who is an editor). It is acceptable to say "this makes [sense]," and ...
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“Make sure to” vs. “Be sure to”: Is the first one correct?

These two versions below are used interchangeably where I live now in the United States: Make sure to do something. Be sure to do something. But I always have found the first version clumsy. I ...
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54 views

'decide not to' or 'decide to not' ? [duplicate]

I came up with this question when I received an email from a committee with a sentence 'We have decided not to publish it', which seems really strange to me because the grammar I learned in English ...
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241 views

Is “have” as in “I have to go” a stative verb or a dynamic verb?

You generally have two types of "have": (1) He has two sons. (stative) (2) He has lunch alone. (dynamic) A stative "have" can be followed by "got", whereas a dynamic "have" cannot: (1a) ...
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Is “he plays the piano” stative or dynamic?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stative_verbs: The same verb may act as stative or dynamic. An English phrase like "he plays the piano" may be either stative or dynamic, according to context. ...
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Can an adjective follow dynamic verbs (“leave”, “declare”)?

I know that an adjective can come after some verbs, such as: be, become, feel, get, look, seem, smell, sound. These verbs are "stative" verbs, which express a state or change of state. For example: ...
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Stative and Dynamic Verbs

Please explain how a stative verb and a dynamic verb can have the same subject without breaking parallel construction. How correct and reasonable is this: I travel around the world and enjoy ...
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73 views

Verbs with prepositions in subordinate clauses? [duplicate]

When I use verbs with prepositions like "to know of" in a subordinate clause like Examples (the 1st is wrong [genitive construction], the 2nd doesn't make sense but it's about grammar): "I wonder ...
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38 views

The word “was” to not use in writing, dont use the word was [closed]

My english teacher told me to get rid of all "was"s in my essay and to replace them. I did it even though it seemed a bit difficult to re-write all my sentences. When writing essays is the word "was" ...
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34 views

How does “to entail” develop to mean “involve (something) as an inevitable part”?

What's the logical derivation behind definition 1 of to entail: Involve (something) as a necessary or inevitable part or consequence: How does the etymology (listed in that link and here) ...
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981 views

What does a door do on its hinge?

In general sense of the language we would say that a door "opens" or "closes". But I am looking for a one-word answer (preferably) that would indicate its motion around the hinge. Does it swivel, ...
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How does “to consist in” develop to mean “to have as an essential feature”?

What's the logical derivation behind this definition of consist in [Definition 1.1]: have as an essential feature: How does the etymology (listed in that link and here) lead to the foregoing ...
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132 views

Is “cry” an intransitive verb, or can it be transitive? - as in “Cry me a river”

When I look up the word, it should be an intransitive verb (no object). However, I'm still curious about the title "Cry me a river". Can I say that "I cried a bucket"?
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'is' or 'are' in lists of counted nouns [duplicate]

Which of the following is correct? Does the is/are depend on the total number of things in the list, or only on the thing immediately following the is/are? There is 1 apple and 1 orange available. ...
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93 views

Can I use the word “promise” with gerund?

Is it possible to use gerund after the verb "promise"? For example, in the sentence "He promised cleaning the window. I'd prefer to say: He promised to clean the window. But today I was told that this ...
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1answer
65 views

“I'm not going to have…” vs. “I'm going not to have…” vs. “I'm going to not have”

Is there a rule that governs when you change around the placement of "not" in a sentence relative to the verb? For example: I'm NOT going to Spain to have fun. or I'm going, NOT to have fun, ...
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Is there a word/term for “verbs which indicate the underlying sentiment of a statement”?

Sorry, I'm not sure the best way to describe this, but hopefully you understand what I mean. Something like the result of the verb(to say) and any adverb(insultingly) = verb(to insult). Another way ...
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107 views

How to say that event is happening now? [closed]

Imagine if I sit in the classroom and I want to say that some lecture is going in another classroom. I what to express that meaning using active voice, like Lecture is happening now But for me, ...
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Is there another word for 'listening' to an answer?

We 'listen' when we're being told something. Is there another verb for 'listening' to an answer to a question we asked? Is 'receiving' an appropriate word for it? It sounds reasonable in the context ...
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What does the -st word ending mean and is it used in any modern vocabulary?

I know there are plenty of words that use the -st ending: wouldst, whilst, unbeknownst, etc. but I'm not really sure what it means to add an -st suffix to a word. What does it mean to add the suffix? ...
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Is “inactivate” really a word?

At my business most of the employees use the word inactivate frequently. Is this proper grammar? I've always used deactivate.
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The process creates the prize? [closed]

I would like to know which one of the sentences is correct and why? The process create the prize. or The process creates the prize.
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“I want to come there” or “I want to go there”

When someone is away from you and wants to be where you are, do they tell you I want to come there or I want to go there?
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Can or should “ask” ever be used as a noun?

"The ask is that you provide me with..." I started hearing "ask" being used as a noun a few years ago. Is this a recent trend? Is it an East Coast thing, unique to North America, or just unique to ...
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Using Crippled as a verb [closed]

Is it right to use the word crippled as a verb with the sense disabled/unable to do things? An example sentence: I am crippled to complete my tasks as I didn't receive the credentials.
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Alternate word for impersonate in terms of Items or things

Well actually I'm searching for the right word for a particular scenario or maybe behavior. Suppose I go to a shop and ask for an item but they don't have it. Now the sales person's priority is to ...
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Usage of “to find out” [closed]

Your father climbed to some rough rocks near the coast to find out that under the rocks, our friend Lake lies severely wounded. Is this usage of "to find something by chance (as a result of ...
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86 views

“Could not have been” vs. “must not have been”

What's the difference between "could not have been" and "must not have been"? For example, That could not have been an easy task. That must not have been an easy task. I've seen both ...
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Antonym for the verb “subordinate”

I'm looking for some sort of antonym for the word subordinate, to be used in a sentence such as She [verb] these principles above all others. It's being used in an academic paper, so it ...
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Using “heretofore” in the past perfect

Is it grammatically correct to use "heretofore" in the past perfect? ...the king's power, which had heretofore been absolute. The meaning of "heretofore" is "before now", but would it still work ...
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How are multiple, alternative direct objects governed by multiple, alternative verbs?

Title 18 USC Sec. 1519 begins: Whoever knowingly alters, destroys, mutilates, conceals, covers up, falsifies, or makes a false entry in any record, document, or tangible object . . . Question: ...
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Verbs in a list separated by commas

I'm not talking about the basic items in a list (e.g. X, Y and Z), but a list of clauses (I think). Example: I am interested in things like going to this place, going to that place, eating food, and ...
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“The problem is he is stingy”

I have this sentence: The problem is he is very stingy with his money. But I feel it sounds weird or even wrong with the two ises so close. Is the sentence structure grammatical? If it isn't, ...
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Use of 'swag' as a verb

I came across this post on swag (the slang word): Attempt to swag should ideally be accompanied by apt spellings. I have seen swag being used only as a noun. I know swagger is a verb, but is ...
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“Share me” or “Share with me”?

I heard people saying: Can you please share me the slides? or Can you share me the note, etc.? I think it should be: Can you please share the slides with me? or Can you share ...
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Usage of “coruscating”

Can coruscating be used as a one word adjective to describe "interesting and exciting"? Basically the usage is "his interesting and exciting research work" which will end up as "his coruscating ...
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Which verb is used to tell: check and pass it

I'm looking for a verb that when I'm saying: XXX it, then I would mean: Check it and if it was valid, pass it What should be the XXX? Or any verb that have a similar meaning as the mentioned sentence. ...
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Can I use 'drenching' to mean 'being drenched'?

I understand 'drench' means to soak or get wet. Can I say 'I'm drenching in the rain' to mean that I'm standing in the rain and getting soaked by it? I mostly see 'drenching' being used only as a ...
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72 views

Classification - There is/are

What is the official 'name' for the 'there is' / 'there are' construction? Is it a verb phrase or a lexical verb? I'd say possibly a verb but it must be the most difficult term to Google.
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Past simple vs present perfect

I have read many online articles. I've read questions and answers on this site. I still can't get my head wrapped around the difference between past simple and present perfect I know the difference ...
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You “show” someone a picture. You “---” someone a song?

In Maltese, we have a verb meaning "to show" corresponding to "to see/to look", and we have a different verb corresponding to "to hear/to listen": inti tara stampa (you look at a picture.) ---- ...
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“I was going to be called Kate if I was a girl”

This is an excerpt from a grammar book by Longman. It was discussing tense and time distinctions and the excerpt is about future time. As you can see in the next example, the reference can be to a ...
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“To refuse oneself” vs “to refuse”

In which cases can we use "to refuse oneself" instead of "to refuse"? Can you use "oneself" to give more emphasis to the sentence, or are you only allow to use it when you refuse something done to ...